Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "Black October" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Mourning and melancholia
Guy Austin

Case studies: Youcef (Mohamed Chouikh, 1993), Bab El-Oued City (Merzak Allouache, 1994), Rome plutôt que vous (Tariq Teguia, 2006). The events of October 1988 form a watershed in recent Algerian history. Known as Black October, this was the moment when popular trust in the state, eroded for years

in Algerian national cinema
Author: Guy Austin

In terms of the so-called 'clash of civilisations' after '9/11', Islamic states such as Algeria have too often been perceived in the West as 'other' and hence as threatening. This book, via an analysis of cinema, provides a discussion on some misunderstandings and assumptions about Algeria, which remains to a large extent underrepresented or misrepresented in the UK media. It is about Algerian national cinema and illuminates the ways in which the official mythologising of a national culture at the 'centre' of the postcolonial state has marginalised the diverse identities within the nation. Tahia ya didou occupies a pivotal position between fiction and documentary, capturing the hectic modernization of the Boumediene era while reflecting back on the aftermath of historical trauma. La Citadelle presents gender differences as culturally engrained and patriarchal power as secure. Youcef, Bab El-Oued City and Rome plutôt que vous present differing visions of how a Freudian melancholia in the shadow of a crushed revolt might relate to Algerian experience after Black October. Lettre à ma soeur listens to the voices of the subaltern; the film is a sense of re-emergence that follows the initial insurgency of Nabila's activism, the trauma of her killing and the subsequent years of silence and self-imposed incarceration.

Guy Austin

population, in contrast with the more nostalgically remembered Boumediene era. The disjuncture between the Algerian people and the state reached a nadir in Black October of 1988, ‘the autumn of the six hundred dead’ (Djebar 2000 : 140). For the first time in the history of the independent Algeria the violence of the regime became undeniably explicit as the army fired on the people, with hundreds of protestors killed and many

in Algerian national cinema
Guy Austin

: 123). The Berber Spring was a product of Kabylia, and was not supported by the Chaouia Berbers of the Aurès, for example. As the novelist Boualem Sansal has noted, the Kabyles are the Berber group most actively engaged in identity struggles (Sansal 2006 : 33). The protests of Black October 1988, which were even more brutally suppressed by the state, were in effect national and not Berberist, but were supported by many

in Algerian national cinema
Procedure and bureaucracy in Special Branch (ITV, 1969–74) and The Sandbaggers (ITV, 1978–80)
Joseph Oldham

1973) Arab terrorists identifying themselves as ‘Black October’ (in an obvious reference to the BSO) kidnap a German diplomat’s daughter and hold her to ransom for $¼ million, with which they intend to buy weapons and fight for the liberation of their unnamed country. Aside from an anonymous voice issuing demands over the telephone, they are denied any opportunity to state their moral case, instead only appearing for a dramatic gun-battle at the end in the evocative space of some abandoned warehouses (see Figure 2.3). They do, however, have an advocate in the form of

in Paranoid visions
Abstract only
Algerian national cinemas
Guy Austin

Bella and the events of Black October. Two key exceptions that we have considered are Omar Gatlato (Allouache, 1976) and La Nouba des femmes du Mont Chenoua (Djebar, 1978). In her discussion of La Nouba des femmes , Khanna posits a fourth cinema, ‘a revolutionary cinema of the cocoon, where the metaphor of the birth of a nation is not repressed into a denial of the feminine’ and which thus goes ‘beyond the guerrilla

in Algerian national cinema
Guy Austin

hybrid with influences from traditional forms alongside Western idioms such as disco and rap, lyrically it articulated ‘the language of the Algerian street’; angry, melancholic, at times erotic, by 1988 raï had became the soundrack to the uprising of Black October (Evans and Phillips 2007 : 112). Raï ’s constituency was described by the singer Chab Ahmed as the mrifiziyn or misfits, a group that included youth and

in Algerian national cinema
A crisis of comprehension
Terence Ranger

journal of Medicine , XIX, 1973, pp. 143-8. 4 L. Brider, ‘Lessons of the 1918 influenza epidemic in Auckland’, New Zealand journal of History , 16, 1982, pp. 97-121. 5 H. Phillips, ‘Black October: the impact of the Spanish

in Imperial medicine and indigenous societies
Abstract only
From lost sites to reclaimed images
Guy Austin

characters in the film, and the warm rapport between Papicha and Tiziri, or between Goucem and Fifi, there is not a comprehensive sense of female solidarity in Viva Laldjérie . The concierge’s wife disapproves of Fifi’s trade, while Goucem disapproves of Papicha’s belly-dancing antics. There is a clear distance between mother and daughter, explicable perhaps by the fact that Goucem represents the lost generation of Black October

in Algerian national cinema
Abstract only
Red October and the Black Atlantic
David Featherstone and Christian Høgsbjerg

importance of the Russian Revolution was recognised on its centenary. See, for example, Jennifer Wilson and Jennifer Suchland, ‘Black October: An Introduction’, Black Perspectives website, 30 October 2017: www.aaihs.org/black-october-an-introduction/ [accessed 1 February 2021]. During the Cold War, as Africa became a site of struggle, having some sense of the impact of the Russian Revolution on Africa became important in Western scholarship for ideological purposes, leading to the appearance of works such as Robert

in The Red and the Black