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Practice and policy lessons from Northern Ireland and the Border Counties
Author: Sandra Buchanan

Transforming Conflict examines lessons learned from the Northern Ireland and Border Counties conflict transformation process through social and economic development and their consequent impacts and implications for practice and policymaking, with a range of functional recommendations produced for other regions emerging from and seeking to transform violent conflict. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the region’s transformation activity, largely amongst grassroots actors, enabled by a number of specific funding programmes, namely the International Fund for Ireland, Peace I and II and INTERREG I, II and IIIA. These programmes have facilitated conflict transformation over more than two decades, presenting a case ripe for lesson sharing. In focusing on the politics of the socioeconomic activities that underpinned the elite negotiations of the peace process, key theoretical transformation concepts are firstly explored, followed by an examination of the social and economic context of Northern Ireland and the Border Counties. The three programmes and their impacts are then assessed before considering what policy lessons can be learned and what recommendations can be made for practice. This is underpinned by a range of semi-structured interviews and the author’s own experience as a project promoter through these programmes in the Border Counties for more than a decade.

Sandra Buchanan

Of the three conflict transformation programmes which Northern Ireland and the Border Counties have benefited from, two, the IFI and the Peace programmes, were specifically tailored for the region. Together with the INTERREG I, II and III(A) programmes, they have directly contributed over €3.25 billion to the region since 1986. While intricate

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Sandra Buchanan

have made any difference? At its most basic, it certainly did not help matters. Northern Ireland’s relationship with the Republic of Ireland is of primary importance here, as the effects of the conflict on social and economic development in the Border Counties have been devastating, thus inextricably linking them to the transformation process. Despite remarkably little analysis of

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Communities and collaboration along the Irish border
Caroline Creamer and Brendan O’Keeffe

their implementation. These, together with exchequer and other monies, enabled national policies to adapt to reflect the changing European agenda and, increasingly, local cum regional realities. In the case of cross-border and transnational cooperation, the International Fund for Ireland4 (IFI) and the Programme for Peace and Reconciliation (or PEACE programme), both dedicated to Northern Ireland and the southern border counties, aimed to stimulate socio-economic revival and growth. More recently, the EU-wide community initiative, INTERREG, has emphasised

in Spacing Ireland
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

A number of long-term conflict transformation funding programmes or tools have been operating in Northern Ireland and the Border Counties since 1986 under the guise of the International Fund for Ireland (IFI), the EU Special Support Programme for Peace and Reconciliation and the EU Programme for Peace and Reconciliation (Peace I, Peace II and Peace III), since 1994 and the

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Sandra Buchanan

AND NORTHERN IRELAND provided €500 million, along with €167 million from both governments, to create the EU Special Support Programme for Peace and Reconciliation (Peace I, 1995–99). Its funding was divided between Northern Ireland and the Border Counties (80/20%).19 The programme’s strategic aim was ‘to reinforce progress towards a peaceful and stable society and to promote reconciliation by increasing economic development and employment, promoting urban and rural regeneration, developing cross-border cooperation and extending social inclusion’.20 The Programme

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland
Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

exclusive measure of the meditative capacity of a conflict-ridden society to promote the broader change processes that must take place. Sustained change, this approach posits, lies with the capacity to mobilize the web.’ 3 While the middle range is certainly critical, in Northern Ireland and the Border Counties the nature of the three tools ensured that valuable grassroots capacity has

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
The case of cross-border commerce
Eoin Magennis

‘mental distance’ is also reflected in tourism patterns, where people from Munster rarely travel to the border counties, let alone Northern Ireland. There is, of course, the more rational cost-benefit issue: to compensate for the time and cost of travelling to the North from Munster, the expenditure must be high. Third, households in the Southern Border counties are

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
Irish republican media activism since the Good Friday Agreement
Author: Paddy Hoey

Newspapers, magazines and pamphlets have always been central, almost sacred, forms of communication within Irish republican political culture. While social media is becoming the primary ideological battleground in many democracies, Irish republicanism steadfastly expresses itself in the traditional forms of activist journalism.

Shinners, Dissos and Dissenters is a long-term analysis of the development of Irish republican activist media since 1998 and the tumultuous years following the end of the Troubles. It is the first in-depth analysis of the newspapers, magazines and online spaces in which the differing strands of Irish republicanism developed and were articulated during a period where schism and dissent defined a return to violence.

Based on an analysis of Irish republican media outlets as well as interviews with the key activists that produced them, this book provides a compelling long-term snapshot of a political ideology in transition. It reveals how Irish Republicanism was moulded by the twin forces of the Northern Ireland Peace Process and the violent internal ideological schism that threatened a return to the ‘bad old days’ of the Troubles.

This book is vital for those studying Irish politics and those interestedin activism as it provides new insights into the role that modern activist media forms have played in the ideological development of a 200-year-old political tradition.

Sandra Buchanan

social impact of the process. 2 Although this criticism by Pugh refers to Bosnia, it is equally applicable to Northern Ireland and the Border Counties. A further criticism is that ‘the rationale for, and modus operandi of, the donor regime are projects. They offer a formalised process for allocating generally

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development