Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 79 items for :

  • "British horror" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Peter Hutchings

what appears to be an inhospitable terrain, with their work taking on an accordingly defensive tone. Nowhere is this unease more evident than in the various critical responses provoked by British horror cinema over the years. From the outraged to the laudatory, these responses are part of the baggage which British horror inevitably brings with it to any critical discussion. If we are to move beyond some of the less helpful long-standing assumptions about horror and towards a more systematic understanding of this

in Hammer and beyond
Exclusions and Exchanges in the History of European Horror Cinema
Peter Hutchings

British horror cinema is often excluded from critical work dealing with European horror cinema or, as it is frequently referred to, Eurohorror. This article argues that such exclusion is unwarranted. From the 1950s onwards there have been many exchanges between British and continental European-based horror production. These have involved not just international co-production deals but also creative per- sonnel moving from country to country. In addition, British horror films have exerted influence on European horror cinema and vice versa. At the same time, the exclusion of British horror from the Eurohorror category reveals limitations in that category, particularly its idealisation of continental European horror production.

Film Studies
Appointment with Fear
Richard J. Hand

Looking at the power of sound and its place in horror culture, including references to sound in classic horror and Gothic fiction. Also features studies of early examples of horror radio.

in Listen in terror
Steven Sheil’s Mum & Dad
Johannes Schlegel

Chapter 12 examines evaluations of the nuclear family in a contextual analysis of the recent Gothic film Mum & Dad (2008, dir. Steven Sheil). This film, as medium of a discursive transformation of familial semantics, reflects and negotiates a paradoxical notion of order and cultural discontent in a way that can no longer be described adequately with the Gothic topoi of transgression and the monstrous. According to Schlegel, Steven Sheil’s film aims at a radical revaluation of familial values, which results in a notion of the family as an entity that is intrinsically perverted, yet the ineluctable condition of being and of subjectivity. Mum & Dad circumvents the inherent dialectics of transgression, by shifting towards something rather ‘ceremonial’, reflecting and negotiating a paradoxical notion of order and uneasiness in contemporary culture.

in Gothic kinship
The Awakening (2011) and Development Practices in the British Film Industry
Alison Peirse

This article reveals how screenwriter Stephen Volk‘s idea for a sequel to The Innocents (1961, Jack Clayton) became, over the course of fifteen years, the British horror film The Awakening (2011, Nick Murphy). It examines practitioner interviews to reflect on creative labour in the British film industry, while also reorientating the analysis of British horror film to the practices of pre-production, specifically development. The research reveals that female protagonist Florence Cathcart was a major problem for the project and demonstrates how the Florence character changed throughout the development process. Repeatedly rewritten and ultimately restrained by successive male personnel, her character reveals persistent, problematic perceptions of gender in British horror filmmaking.

Film Studies
Abstract only
The British horror film
Editor: Johnny Walker
Author: Peter Hutchings

The introductory chapter is written to help position the reader regarding the academic climate that saw the first edition of Hammer and Beyond materialise, to consider some of the book’s omissions, and to assess the state of British horror in the years immediately leading up to, and following, its publication.

Abstract only
Dark imaginer

This book explores the diverse literary, film and visionary creations of the polymathic and influential British artist Clive Barker. It presents groundbreaking essays that critically reevaluate Barker's oeuvre. These include in-depth analyses of his celebrated and lesser known novels, short stories, theme park designs, screen and comic book adaptations, film direction and production, sketches and book illustrations, as well as responses to his material from critics and fan communities. The book examines Barker's earlier fiction and its place within British horror fiction and socio-cultural contexts. Selected tales from the Books of Blood are exemplary in their response to the frustrations and political radicalism of the 1980s British cultural anxieties. Aiming to rally those who stand defiant of Thatcher's polarising vision of neoliberal British conservatism, Weaveworld is revealed to be a savage indictment of 1980s British politics. The book explores Barker's transition from author to filmmaker, and how his vision was translated, captured, and occasionally compromised in its adaptation from page to the screen. Barker's work contains features which can be potentially read as feminine and queer, positioning them within traditions of the Gothic, the melodrama and the fantastic. The book examines Barker's works, especially Hellraiser, Nightbreed, and Lord of Illusions, through the critical lenses of queer culture, desire, and brand recognition. It considers Barker's complex and multi-layered marks in the field, exploring and re-evaluating his works, focusing on Tortured Souls and Mister B. Gone's new myths of the flesh'.

Abstract only
Peter Hutchings

David Pirie concluded his 1973 study of British horror cinema with an optimistic call for a regeneration of the genre: ‘On present reckoning at least (although it is much too early to say with any certainty), the gothic cinematic revival in England looks like having a more lasting popular success than the original literary movement from which it derives.’ 1 Unfortunately, Pirie’s optimism was misplaced. British horror as a distinct category of a national cinema was not to survive the

in Hammer and beyond
Peter Hutchings

through the last part of the 1950s, into the 1960s and then on to the 1970s, British horror was one of the most commercially successful areas of British cinema. 2 As Wyndham indicates, easily the most prolific of horror producers was the relatively small company called Hammer Films, from which there emerged from 1956 onwards a series of gothic horrors, most notably those featuring Peter Cushing as Baron Frankenstein and Christopher Lee as Count Dracula, which were to become famous throughout much of the

in Hammer and beyond
Introduction to the new edition
Johnny Walker

‘Hutch has gone!’ –Luke, The Ritual (David Bruckner, 2017) In 1989 Peter Ward Hutchings, a doctoral candidate at the University of East Anglia in the UK, earned his PhD for a thesis entitled ‘The British Horror Film: An Investigation of British Horror Production in its National Context’. Four years later, Manchester University Press published a revised version of the dissertation as Hammer and Beyond: The British Horror Film ( Figure 0.1 ). 1 Both

in Hammer and beyond