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Steven Sheil’s Mum & Dad
Johannes Schlegel

Chapter 12 examines evaluations of the nuclear family in a contextual analysis of the recent Gothic film Mum & Dad (2008, dir. Steven Sheil). This film, as medium of a discursive transformation of familial semantics, reflects and negotiates a paradoxical notion of order and cultural discontent in a way that can no longer be described adequately with the Gothic topoi of transgression and the monstrous. According to Schlegel, Steven Sheil’s film aims at a radical revaluation of familial values, which results in a notion of the family as an entity that is intrinsically perverted, yet the ineluctable condition of being and of subjectivity. Mum & Dad circumvents the inherent dialectics of transgression, by shifting towards something rather ‘ceremonial’, reflecting and negotiating a paradoxical notion of order and uneasiness in contemporary culture.

in Gothic kinship
The Awakening (2011) and Development Practices in the British Film Industry
Alison Peirse

This article reveals how screenwriter Stephen Volk‘s idea for a sequel to The Innocents (1961, Jack Clayton) became, over the course of fifteen years, the British horror film The Awakening (2011, Nick Murphy). It examines practitioner interviews to reflect on creative labour in the British film industry, while also reorientating the analysis of British horror film to the practices of pre-production, specifically development. The research reveals that female protagonist Florence Cathcart was a major problem for the project and demonstrates how the Florence character changed throughout the development process. Repeatedly rewritten and ultimately restrained by successive male personnel, her character reveals persistent, problematic perceptions of gender in British horror filmmaking.

Film Studies
Exclusions and Exchanges in the History of European Horror Cinema
Peter Hutchings

British horror cinema is often excluded from critical work dealing with European horror cinema or, as it is frequently referred to, Eurohorror. This article argues that such exclusion is unwarranted. From the 1950s onwards there have been many exchanges between British and continental European-based horror production. These have involved not just international co-production deals but also creative per- sonnel moving from country to country. In addition, British horror films have exerted influence on European horror cinema and vice versa. At the same time, the exclusion of British horror from the Eurohorror category reveals limitations in that category, particularly its idealisation of continental European horror production.

Film Studies
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The British horror film
Editor: Johnny Walker
Author: Peter Hutchings

The introductory chapter is written to help position the reader regarding the academic climate that saw the first edition of Hammer and Beyond materialise, to consider some of the book’s omissions, and to assess the state of British horror in the years immediately leading up to, and following, its publication.

Exclusions and exchanges in the history of European horror
Peter Hutchings

a certain extent, while British horror is excluded, with no wholly British horror film featuring anywhere in 100 European Horror Films . The main reason why this particular exclusion might seem unwarranted is that the histories of British and continental European horror movements have often been seen by genre critics and historians as being entwined, especially in the late 1950s and early 1960s when an international cycle of gothic horror films both dominated the horror market and helped to launch, in

in Hammer and beyond
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From Dead of Night to The Quatermass Experiment
Peter Hutchings

which perverse sexuality – in the form of the Glueman, an apparently deranged magistrate who pours glue into the hair of various women – was seen as an integral part of rural life. 6 It is clear then that, while not without its precursors, Ealing Studios’ Dead of Night (Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden, Robert Hamer, 1945) is the first important recognisably British horror film. However, to view Dead of Night as marking the ‘birth’ of British horror cinema is rather problematic

in Hammer and beyond
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Horror production
Peter Hutchings

1964–66 By the mid-1960s the British horror film, largely because of Hammer’s unprecedented success, had become firmly associated in the public’s mind with period settings. What one finds between 1964 (the year of The Gorgon ) and 1966 is a cluster of films which seek, presumably in the commercial interests of product differentiation, to relocate horror in a recognisable present-day world while at the same time appealing to the already established market for that period horror

in Hammer and beyond
Abstract only
Editors: Agnes Andeweg and Sue Zlosnik

Although the preoccupation of Gothic storytelling with the family has often been observed, it invites a more systematic exploration. Gothic Kinship brings together case studies of Gothic kinship ties in film and literature and offers a synthesis and theoretical exploration of the different appearances of the Gothic family. The volume explores the cultural mediation of the shifting relations of kinship and power in gothic fictionfrom the eighteenth century up to the present day. Writers discussed include early British Gothic writers such as Eleanor Sleath and Louisa Sidney Stanhope as well as a range of later authors writing in English, including Elizabeth Gaskell, William March, Stephen King, Poppy Z. Brite, Patricia Duncker, J. K. Rowling and Audrey Niffenegger. There are also essays on Dutch authors (Louis Couperus and Renate Dorrestein) and on the film directors Wes Craven and Steven Sheil.

Arranged chronologically, the various contributions show that both early and contemporary Gothic display very diverse kinship ties, ranging from metaphorical to triangular, from queer to nuclear-patriarchal. Gothic proves to be a rich source of expressing both subversive and conservative notions of the family.

Introduction to the new edition
Johnny Walker

‘Hutch has gone!’ –Luke, The Ritual (David Bruckner, 2017) In 1989 Peter Ward Hutchings, a doctoral candidate at the University of East Anglia in the UK, earned his PhD for a thesis entitled ‘The British Horror Film: An Investigation of British Horror Production in its National Context’. Four years later, Manchester University Press published a revised version of the dissertation as Hammer and Beyond: The British Horror Film ( Figure 0.1 ). 1 Both

in Hammer and beyond
Peter Hutchings

as expected, the reviews of British horror films become shorter in length as time passes. Linked with this, they also begin to use a recognisable shorthand based on the name of ‘Hammer’. For example, only two of the available reviews of The Curse of Frankenstein (Terence Fisher, 1957) mention Hammer at all ( Sunday Express , 5/5/57, Evening News , 2/5/57). The reviews for Dracula (Fisher, 1958), released one year later, contain a few scattered references to the studio. A year after that we can

in Hammer and beyond