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Elizaveta Gaufman

, recovered and managed to fulfill his lifelong dream of becoming a pilot and (spoiler alert) finding a lost Arctic expedition. Others were not as lucky: Spanish flu claimed approximately 2.7 million people in the new Soviet state ( Supotnitsky 2006 , Egorov 2019 ). The death toll during the COVID-19 pandemic in Russia hovers at the moment of writing around 500,000 ( Meduza 2022 ), but the Russian population

in Everyday foreign policy
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo
,
Elena Estrada Cocina
,
Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert
,
Raquel González Juarez
, and
Ana Garcia Mingo

extensive experience in situations of human distress such as armed conflicts, epidemics and natural disasters in lower income countries – were completely unprepared to face a crisis of this magnitude. From the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the few certainties was that the risk of serious disease increased with age and comorbidities, therefore older residents in care homes would be particularly vulnerable. In these centres, many residents live together in closed spaces

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Governing COVID dead in southern Arizona
Robin C. Reineke

Research into the governance of dead bodies, primarily focused on post-conflict contexts, has often focused on the aspects of the management of dead bodies that involve routinisation, bureaucratisation and order. Less attention has been paid to the governance of the dead in times of relative peace and, in particular, to the aspects of such work that are less bureaucratised and controlled. This article explores the governance of dead bodies in pandemic times – times which although extraordinary, put stress on ordinary systems in ways that are revealing of power and politics. Observations for this article come from over fifteen years of ethnographic research at a medical examiner’s office in Arizona, along with ten focused interviews in 2020 with medico-legal authorities and funeral directors specifically about the COVID-19 pandemic. The author argues that the pandemic revealed the ways in which the deathcare industry in the United States is an unregulated, decentralised and ambiguous space.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Abstract only
Falling standards (and masonry)
John Bowers

vitriol in our political discourse, injected by the divisiveness of having gone since 2010 through four general elections and three referendums, as well as the long-running deadlock over Brexit and the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was a time of rising populism. But there were also deeper structural issues, including a feeling that the best and brightest no longer go into politics and that there are few ‘big beasts’ in the Cabinet. Johnson was not interested in surrounding himself with major figures. The

in Downward spiral
Open Access (free)
Burying the dead in times of pandemic
Diane O’Donoghue

Both historical and contemporary records of mass contagion provide occasions for visibility to persons who otherwise remain little recognised and even less studied: those who bury the dead. While global reports attest to self-advocacy among cemetery workers in the current COVID-19 pandemic, the psychological complexities of their labour go virtually unseen. Findings on the experiences of those doing such work reveal a striking contrast. While societal disavowal often renders their task as abject and forgettable, those who inter the remains frequently report affective connections to the dead that powerfully, and poignantly, undermine this erasure. Acknowledging such empathic relationality allows us to look at this profession in areas where it has never been considered, such as psychoanalytic work on ‘mentalisation’ or in contemporary ethics. The article concludes with an example from the accounts of those who have buried the dead in the massed graves on New York’s Hart Island.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
What the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Shown Us about the Humanitarian Sphere’s Approach to Local Faith Engagement
Ellen Goodwin

Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic has been primarily a health emergency – a potentially fatal infectious disease, causing respiratory illnesses that can vary in severity. However, as witnessed during previous epidemics and pandemics ( Evans, 1988 ; Kleinnman and Watson, 2006 ; Qui et al. , 2018 ), COVID-19 proved to be much more than a health emergency, with serious social, political and economic consequences. While the COVID-19 pandemic

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lachlan McIver
,
Maria Guevara
, and
Gabriel Alcoba

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed multiple fault lines in the performances of health services at every level – from community to national to global – in ensuring universal, equitable access to preventive and curative care. Tragically, this has been to the detriment of those who have suffered and died not only from COVID-19, but also from the myriad other ailments affecting people around the world. Of those, we wish to highlight here some key categories of diseases that have caused a greater

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A Belated but Welcome Theory of Change on Mental Health and Development
Laura Davidson

disability and vice versa. 7 Neglect of underlying social and economic determinants reduces all healthcare service impact. The interconnection has become painfully apparent during the current COVID-19 pandemic, with the novel coronavirus compounding and complicating the disease burden among the poor. For example, UK research revealed that people with hypertension, diabetes and obesity are at higher risk of poor virus outcomes ( The Health Foundation, 2020 ; Public Health England, 2020

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
The COVID-19 pandemic
Martin Yuille
and
Bill Ollier

In this postscript, we want first to comment on the global character of COVID-19. Then we shall follow the four sections of Saving sick Britain so as to draw some parallels between this pandemic and what we have been calling the modern plagues. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the global character of viral diseases, while this book has largely focussed on the common long-term conditions in an insular, even Anglo-centric, fashion. The reasons for our focus were not only because we felt we had to recognise the reality of rising parochialism in Britain but

in Saving sick Britain
Lessons from the MSF Listen Experience
Jake Leyland
,
Sandrine Tiller
, and
Budhaditya Bhattacharya

Background In June 2020, a few months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) initiated a project to better understand and respond to health misinformation in humanitarian settings. Along with the global surge in morbidity and mortality, COVID-19 brought a deluge of health misinformation – including in the communities that our teams work in across the world. To

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs