Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

3 Canada Far away across the ocean Is the green land of my birth; There my thoughts are turning ever To the dearest place on earth. Are the fields as green, I wonder, As they were in days of yore When I played in happy childhood By the Blue Atlantic shore?1 This song, penned by Mrs Charles E. Potter from Saskatoon, indicates the complex relationship with the British Isles experienced by many Orangewomen in Canada at the beginning of the twentieth century. As the threat of Home Rule loomed large in 1912, Potter felt the pull of ‘old Ireland’ as she called for

in Women and the Orange Order
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

adoption in Canada is a question which you have better means of determining than I possess.’ 3 By 1840 there were four colonies in mainland British North America, clustered in the south-eastern corner of the vast Canadian land mass, the rest of which remained under the administration of the Hudson’s Bay Company. Representative government had been introduced during the last quarter of the eighteenth century

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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The origins of colonial museums
John M. MacKenzie

Introduction Museums in Canada have a longer, though somewhat chequered, history than elsewhere in the British Empire. It may have been something of a false start, but they initially emerged from Catholic religious and educational contexts in Quebec. By the nineteenth century, the centre of gravity had moved into the Maritime Provinces, into the realms of auto

in Museums and empire
Open Access (free)
‘A vote the same as any other person’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

nations as White. In post-confederation Canada the franchise was seldom an issue for debate. The need to bring together disparate colonies, the financing and construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway and the establishing of systems of governance in the old Hudson’s Bay territories were the issues which preoccupied the government in Ottawa in its early nation-building years

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto and the Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria
John M. MacKenzie

The Royal Ontario Museum In 1834 the population of Toronto had been no more than about 10,000. By the 1880s, it stood at around 86,000. But by 1911 it had reached 375,000 and the city was on its way to being the largest in Canada, overtaking Montreal as the principal commercial and industrial centre, and with international ambitions to go with it. The strikingly rapid growth

in Museums and empire
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

In the late summer of 1928, twenty-five young women aged 17–18 years, representatives of sixteen élite English public schools, 1 assembled with their parents on the departure platform at Euston Station in London, to begin a two-month tour of Canada. From London they took a train to Liverpool, and then went by sea to Canada. Figure 4.1 outlines the Canadian itinerary

in Female imperialism and national identity
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

During the Depression and the Second World War the IODE’s vision for Canada was influenced by Britain’s weakening position in relation to a strengthening Canada. Although the influence of investments and popular culture from the USA was increasing at that time, British immigrants were still valued as superior to those of other races and the IODE promoted its own version of

in Female imperialism and national identity
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Returned migrants and the Canada Club
Kathleen Burke

society 1 but, in an age when the majority of people in the homeland had little knowledge of, or interest in, colonial conditions and affairs, migrants who had achieved social status during their stay in less developed colonies faced additional difficulties on their return to the metropole. Such was the situation that faced Canadians visiting or returning to Britain in the first half of the nineteenth century. Canadians were often dismayed to find that the British knew very little about the colony, nor was there a fitting

in Emigrant homecomings
A dominion responsibility
Kent Fedorowich

the ‘returned man’ is a curious specimen and difficult, he demands attention on every occasion. 1 The sudden ending of hostilities in November 1918 and the need to repatriate Canadian veterans quickly made it imperative that Ottawa formulate a broader soldier

in Unfit for heroes
International socialisation across the pond?
Kelly Kollman

Kollman 06_Tonra 01 03/12/2012 12:45 Page 143 6 Same-sex unions in Canada and the United States: international socialisation across the pond? This chapter examines the extent to which processes of international socialisation have shaped debates about same-sex relationship recognition in Canada and the US despite their greater distance – both geographic and political – from the European polity in which the SSU norm first appeared. Perhaps because of these distances very little of the burgeoning literature on US and Canadian LGBT politics has examined the ways

in The same-sex unions revolution in western democracies