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Editor: Saul Dubow

The history and sociology of science has not been well developed in southern Africa as compared to India, Australia or Latin America. This book deals with case studies drawn from South Africa, Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia), Mozambique and Mauritius, and examines the relationship between scientific claims and practices, and the exercise of colonial power. European intellectuals saw in Africa images of their own prehistory and societal development. The book reveals the work of the Swiss naturalist and anthropologist Henri Junod. The relative status of Franco-Mauritian, Creoles and Indo-Mauritian peasants was an important factor in gaining knowledge of and access to canes. After the Boer War, science was one of the regenerating forces, and the British Association found it appropriate to hold its 1905 meetings in the Southern African subcontinent. White farmers in the Cape Colony in the late nineteenth century often greeted with suspicion the enumeration of livestock and crop. The book focuses on the connections between the apartheid state's capacity to count and to control. Apartheid statecraft included aspirations of totalising modes of racialised knowledge. Included in the theme of state rationality and techniques of domination is the specialized use of dogs by police in apprehending black alleged criminals. The book discusses the Race Welfare Society, which turned to eugenics for a blueprint on how to cultivate a healthy and productive white population. However, George Gale and Sidney and Emily Kark advocated socialised medicine, and had a genuine desire to promote the broad health needs of Africans.

Biblical literacy and Khoesan national renewal in the Cape Colony
Jared McDonald

In London, on 27 June 1836, Andries Stoffels, a Gonaqua Khoekhoe from the Cape Colony, appeared before the House of Commons Select Committee on Aborigines in British Settlements. Convened at the behest of humanitarian MP, Thomas Fowell Buxton, the Committee investigated the impact of colonial settlement on indigenous peoples in Britain's expanding empire. Born in the Zuurveld near the Bushman's River some time between 1776 and 1786, Stoffels witnessed the Dutch conquest of his people's land in the eastern Cape. As a boy, he served on Boer

in Chosen peoples
Abstract only
Tactics and networks
Zoë Laidlaw

utilised over a number of campaigns and maintained by permanent representatives in the metropole. This chapter considers lobbyists campaigning on the Cape Colony or New South Wales, demonstrating that lobbyists who dealt with quite different issues nevertheless shared an understanding of colonial power and how it might be manipulated. Colonial pressure groups faced many of the same

in Colonial connections, 1815–45
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Zoë Laidlaw

nineteenth-century Britain. It investigates imperial power, asking where such power lay, and how it was exercised, influenced and perceived, and suggests that the study of networks of personal communication adds new depth to the question of colonial governance. Although this book draws on evidence from across the British Empire, three sites – Britain, the Cape Colony and New South Wales – are of particular

in Colonial connections, 1815–45
Abstract only
John McAleer

the Cape of Good Hope came into British hands via a circuitous route, almost 150 years after the first European settlers had arrived. 3 In broader terms, however, the history of the Cape Colony, and its relationship with the increasing numbers of European vessels that passed it, powerfully demonstrates its place in the world of the Indian Ocean where it acted as the gateway to Asia. It also

in Representing Africa
Time and the Sabbath beyond the Cape frontiers
Giordano Nanni

and civilisation in places as far apart as the Kat River Settlement, in the Cape Colony, and New Zealand. 3 Likewise, missionary societies regularly published reports of the number of peoples who had been newly inducted into the seven-day regime as a means of providing their metropolitan supporters and patrons with a measure of their progress. For instance, shortly after the establishment of a new mission among the

in The colonisation of time
Open Access (free)
Saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

British and colonial push into the interior. When, in 1871, Lieutenant-Governor Keate of Natal awarded political sovereignty over the area of the diamond diggings to the Griqua Chiefdom of Nicholas Waterboer, Waterboer promptly asked for British protection. Britain annexed the area in 1871; and in 1880, under the name of Griqualand West, Kimberley and the diamond fields became part of the Cape Colony

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Livestock statistics and expertise in the late nineteenth-century Cape Colony, 1850-1900
Dawn Nell

could evoke strong sentiments in the Cape Colony in the late nineteenth century. While certain sectors of the colony’s inhabitants viewed statistics as an indispensable aspect of ‘modern’ life and put pressure on the civil service to provide more reliable statistics, other sectors of the population viewed enumeration with suspicion. This chapter looks at the tensions surrounding agricultural statistics

in Science and society in southern Africa
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From colonisation to globalisation
Giordano Nanni

Greenwich at 1.00 p.m. GMT came to be echoed by colonial timeballs and time signals in the harbours of Madras, Calcutta, Hong Kong, Mauritius, St Helena, Fremantle, Sydney, Melbourne, Wellington and elsewhere. Soon, railway timetables and public clocks in the colonies would also be adjusted to GMT, bringing these outposts in line with the dominant temporal standard of the metropolis. The Cape Colony adopted

in The colonisation of time
The Colonial Office, 1815–36
Zoë Laidlaw

guided by rough concepts of utility’. 3 This chapter examines the response of the metropolitan government to the challenges posed by the British Empire, and specifically to New South Wales and the Cape Colony, between 1815 and 1836. In this discussion, the networks of personal connection which emanated from the Colonial Office emerge as critical for imperial governance. Tracing the

in Colonial connections, 1815–45