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The San Juan Triennial tracking the new century
Mari Carmen Ramírez

Puertorriqueña, 1970). 2 See Ramírez, Mari Carmen, ‘Tactics for Thriving in Adversity: Conceptualism in Latin America, 1960–80’ in Inverted Utopias (Houston/London: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and Yale University Press, 2004), pp. 425

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Monsters of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling

9 ‘What rough beast’? Monsters of post-­Celtic Tiger Ireland Kieran Keohane and Carmen Kuhling What rough beast is coming in the wake of the death of the Celtic Tiger? Our hypothesis, formulated in the spirit of Yeats and Joyce, sees repetition and reiteration: that what will appear to us in the guise of the new is better understood in terms of recurrence.1 For Joyce and for Yeats, recurrence represents a philosophy of history, taken from the Greeks through Vico (1999) and Nietzsche (1995), attuned and oriented to the politics of the present. For Yeats (1920a

in From prosperity to austerity
Carmen Ciller

6 The influence of Argentinian acting schools in Spain from the 1980s Carmen Ciller During the 1970s, the Spanish film and television industry welcomed Argentinian actors and actresses, who were escaping from General Jorge Rafael Videla’s dictatorship, which had started with the coup of 1976 and coincided with the Spanish transition to democracy. The first wave consisted of actors such as Hector Alterio, Hector Colomé, Norma Aleandro and Marilina Ross; the second wave followed soon after, with Ricardo Darín, Daniel Freire and Federico Luppi. Decades afterwards

in Performance and Spanish film
Carmen Mangion

, with an average age of thirty-five, mode of twenty-five, and median of thirty-three. Susan O’Brien’s study of the Daughters of Charity in Britain shows a similar decline, from twenty-six to twenty-one, in average age from the decadal cohorts of the 1920s to the 1950s. Susan O’Brien , Leaving God for God: The Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul in Britain, 1847–2017 ( London : Darton, Longman & Todd , 2017 ), pp. 277 – 8 . 24 For more on the nineteenth-century literature see Carmen M. Mangion , Contested Identities: Catholic Women Religious in

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

Wishart , 1997 ); Carmen M. Mangion , ‘ Religious Suffrage Societies ’, in Krista Cowman (ed.), Women's Suffrage ( Abingdon : Routledge , forthcoming ). 7 Caitríona Beaumont , Housewives and Citizens: Domesticity and the Women’s Movement in England, 1928–64 ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2013 ), p. 3 ; Caitríona Beaumont , ‘ Citizens Not Feminists: The Boundary Negotiated between Citizenship and Feminism by Mainstream Women’s Organisations in England, 1928–39 ’, Women’s History Review , 9 ( 2000 ), 411 – 29 ; Caitríona

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Post-war modernity and religious vocations
Carmen Mangion

–1949, 55.1 per cent of Catholic marriages were classified as mixed marriages. 28 Francesca M. Steele , The Convents of Great Britain ( London : Sands and M. H. Gill , 1902 ). 29 Carmen M. Mangion , Contested Identities: Catholic Women Religious in Nineteenth-Century England and Wales ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2008 ), pp. 190 – 1 . 30 Paul Gerrard interviewed forty Poor Clares in the 1990s and observed that many entrants were motivated by devotion to Franciscan saints. Few of my narrators discussed their attraction to religious

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

-Twentieth-Century England ’, Historical Journal , 50 ( 2007 ), 173 – 96 . 31 There are some parallels with apprenticeship practices, for example those working in the trades, bricklayers, as well as within domestic service. 32 Carmen M. Mangion , ‘ Women Religious and Family Relationships ’, Catholic Ancestor , 16 : 2 ( 2016 ), 60 – 8 . 33 Permissions for exceptions (for examples when someone was ill) were given by the abbess or local leader. 34 Carmen M. Mangion , ‘ Syon Abbey’s “Second Summer”, 1900–1950 ’, in Elin Andersson , Claes Gejrot , E. A

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

( 2015 ), 792 – 811 . 20 Carmen M. Mangion , ‘ “Shades of Difference”: Poor Clares in Britain ’, in Christian Sorrel (ed.), Le Concile Vatican II et le monde des religieux (Europe occidentale et Amérique du Nord, 1950–1980) ( Lyon : LARHRA , 2019 ), pp. 317 – 29 . 21 PDA: CMB 3.2, Letter from abbess to bishop, dated 19 May 1951; Letter from Abbess Magdalen [Nevin] to bishop, dated 13 June 1964. 22 Pope Paul VI, Motu proprio Ecclesiae Sanctae: Establishing Norms for Carrying Out Certain Decrees of the Second Sacred Vatican Council , trans. J

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

published interviews of North American and Australian former and current women religious. The stories they tell are often polarised into ‘strong women’ who worked through repressive pre-conciliar regimes to do great things and ‘angry women’ who left, enraged and unable to countenance what they saw as the hypocrisy of religious life and the Catholic Church. 7 Stories about women religious by those they educated are equally divergent. The feminist press Virago published There’s Something about a Convent Girl in 1991. Its founder, Carmen Callil, a convent girl in 1940s

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-32417296 , accessed 8 November 2018. 70 Carmen M. Mangion , Contested Identities: Catholic Women Religious in Nineteenth-Century England and Wales ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2008 ), pp. 45–6 . 71 Cada et al. , Shaping the Coming Age , pp. 53, 59. Susan O’Brien is rightly sceptical of applying the normative pattern of male religious life to women’s religious life. Susan O’Brien , ‘ A Note on Apostolic Religious Life ’, in Christopher Jamison OSB (ed.), The Disciples’ Call: Theologies of Vocation from Scripture to the Present Day

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age