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This book combines mainly chronological coverage of all major stages of Carol Reed's career with special attention not only to the acknowledged masterpieces but also to films that deserve re-appraisal (e .g. Outcast of the Islands, Trapeze, Oliver!) . Reed's interest in the parent-child relationship, an interminable inquest across all the films into the origins of the self, is remarkable from the outset. Reed's characteristic fondness for low angle shots intensifies the atmosphere of doom from which none of the characters ever ultimately finds relief. Followed by The Third Man, Outcast of the Islands, The Man Between and A Kid for Two Farthings, The Fallen Idol was the first of five films made for Alexander Korda's London Films. Looking back at the film now it is clear that Outcast belongs to that group of 1950s films that challenge the conformist reputation of British films made during the decade. Reed's eye for detail and for creating atmosphere through photography or editing is unsurpassed in the British cinema. While the preponderance of father/son narratives may indeed be partly attributable, as some have argued, to feelings prompted by his illegitimacy, Reed's closeness to his mother is an equally significant contributory factor to the films' representation of personal and family relationships.

Peter William Evans

Outcast of the Islands (1951) Any film directed by Carol Reed after The Third Man was bound to attract attention. Reviewers expecting another masterpiece found themselves almost unanimously expressing disappointment at Outcast of the Islands . The Daily Mail ’s comments are representative: The difficulty of poor Carol Reed is

in Carol Reed
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Peter William Evans

, largely to allow greater room for discussion of two undeservedly neglected films; and second, in the section devoted to Graham Greene, whose work with Carol Reed led to one of the most significant partnerships in the history of film and literature, by grouping together Our Man in Havana (1959) with The Fallen Idol and The Third Man . I have relied on a variety of theoretical and critical models

in Carol Reed
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Girls in the news
Peter William Evans

As Carol Reed began to make his way in films the British cinema in the 1930s was already characterised, on the one hand, by the rise of the documentary tradition epitomised by Grierson and Cavalcanti and, on the other, by popular genre-based, star-studded films and studio production headed by moghuls like Alexander Korda. Reed’s films, like those directed by Victor Saville, Alfred Hitchcock, Michael

in Carol Reed
Peter William Evans

be replaced by Lewis Milestone. Even so, Columbia thought highly enough of Reed to offer him The Running Man . Based on Shelly Smith’s novel Ballad of the Running Man (1962), Reed’s The Running Man , scripted by John Mortimer, was a moderate box office success, and a critical failure. The Times headline declared ‘Sir Carol Reed underrates his audience’ (Anon 1963h ). Richard Roud (1963

in Carol Reed
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Peter William Evans

attitude of glum hostility, Oliver Reed, Carol Reed’s nephew, perfectly captures the character’s uncontrollable violence, born of inner turmoil and a damaged psyche that feeds off the unappeased aggression all around. In an East End underworld culture of machismo and fear of feminisation, Sikes acts in accordance with the demands of a perverse social law, perfectly illustrated by the lyrics of Nancy’s ‘As Long as He Needs Me

in Carol Reed
The Graham Greene films
Peter William Evans

, obviously attracted Korda. Partly financed by David Selznick, The Fallen Idol , of all Carol Reed’s child-centred films, dedicates, along with A Kid for Two Farthings , greatest amount of screen time to a child actor – Bobby Henrey – and provides an opportunity for more leisurely treatment of a child’s response to a crisis in which he, his friend, the butler Baines (Ralph Richardson), Mrs Baines (Sonia Dresdel) and Julie

in Carol Reed
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Love and death
Peter William Evans

mining community – Wales in the case of How Green Was My Valley , Northumberland in The Stars Look Down – these films reveal key divergences between Hollywood and Britain, as well as between John Ford and Carol Reed. While Stars , for instance, has been read by Graham Greene ( 1980 : 265) as a film about the class struggle between miners and mine-owners, it also surveys, not always to Greene’s liking (though he finds much

in Carol Reed
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Peter William Evans

By any standards, Reed's achievements are considerable, but his often self-deprecating remarks have not helped his reputation. Reed liberates his films from raw material provided not by divine inspiration, but by a host of collaborators. In producing the finished article from inchoate form, he nevertheless managed to stamp on it his unmistakable personality. Reed's eye for detail and for creating atmosphere through photography or editing is unsurpassed in the British cinema. Although many films concentrate on the shadow of the father over the son, they also include scrutiny of the son's quest for the mother. In addressing issues like these, sometimes through brilliant handling of film form, Reed stakes a legitimate claim to be considered one of the truly outstanding figures of the British cinema.

in Carol Reed
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Author: Steve Chibnall

Since his first directorial commission at Welwyn Studios in 1950, Lee Thompson has directed forty-five pictures for theatrical release, covering almost every genre of the cinema. His remarkable ability to adapt his style to suit the material has made him perhaps the most versatile director ever produced by Britain. This book intends to plot the trajectory of a unique film-maker through the typical constraints and opportunities offered by British cinema as a dominant studio system gave way to independent production in the two decades after the Second World War. Thompson was born in Bristol just before the First World War. By the time Thompson left school his ambition was to be an actor, and he joined Nottingham Repertory, making his debut in Young Woodley in 1931. Thompson's opportunity to direct a play came when he received an offer from Hollywood for the film rights to his play Murder Without Crime. His debut box (or ottoman) of tricks went out on the ABC circuit as a double bill with an American film about a GI finding romance in Europe, Four Days Leave. Although the cutting room remained sacrosanct, directors of Thompson's generation had more influence over the final cut of a picture than their predecessors. The Yellow Balloon may be frustratingly limited in its social critique, but as a piece of film making, it was rightly praised for its performances and technical proficiency.