Search results

No more ‘Australia for the White Man’
David Olds and Robert Phiddian

When Sir Frank Packer took over the Sydney-based Bulletin magazine in late 1960, he handed editorship to Donald Horne. The first thing Horne did was to take the slogan ‘Australia for the White Man’ off the banner. This removal was not merely cosmetic, because Horne was determined to refashion the symbolic organ of White Australian cultural nationalism in a new internationalist way. While Horne's politics at the time were Cold War libertarian, he was already a maverick, and showed this by hiring Les Tanner as chief cartoonist and art director

in Comic empires
Roger Sabin

Duval's female characters present a puzzle. If we ask whether she was a women's cartoonist, this points to several supplementary questions. Was her work aimed at a female readership, and did she emphasise ‘female issues’ and female characters? (After all, must not there be a difference between strips and cartoons that happen to have been drawn by a woman, and ‘women's cartooning’, which purposefully concerns itself with the expression of women's experience?) And was she ‘for women’ in the sense of being pro-women's rights? In other words, was

in Marie Duval
Performing popular culture at the Crystal Palace c.1900
Ann Roberts

4 The armless artist and the lightning cartoonist: performing popular culture at the Crystal Palace c.1900 Ann Roberts Discussions of art at the Crystal Palace have largely focused on historic sculpture and architecture contained in its Fine Arts Courts. Exemplified by the series of official guides produced by the Crystal Palace Company from 1854, its commitment to ‘preserve the high moral and educational tone’ of the original Hyde Park enterprise is clear.1 The Palace’s General Manager, Henry Gillman, for example, writing in the 1899 General Guide to the

in After 1851
Abstract only
Imperialism in cartoons, caricature, and satirical art

Comic empires is a unique collection of new research exploring the relationship between imperialism and cartoons, caricature, and satirical art. Edited by leading scholars across both fields, the volume provides new perspectives on well-known events, and also illuminates little-known players in the ‘great game’ of empire. It contains contributions from noted as well as emerging experts. Keren Zdafee and Stefanie Wichhart both examine Egypt (in the turbulent 1930s and during the Suez Crisis, respectively); David Olds and Robert Phiddian explore the decolonisation of cartooning in Australia from the 1960s. Fiona Halloran, the foremost expert on Thomas Nast (1840–1902), examines his engagement with US westward expansion. The overseas imperialism of the United States is analysed by Albert D. Pionke and Frederick Whiting, as well as Stephen Tuffnell. Shaoqian Zhang takes a close look at Chinese and Japanese propagandising during the conflict of 1937–1945; and David Lockwood interrogates the attitudes of David Low (1891–1963) towards British India. Some of the finest comic art of the period is deployed as evidence, and examined seriously – in its own right – for the first time. Readers will find cartoons on subjects as diverse as the Pacific, Cuba, and Cyprus, from Punch, Judge, and Puck. Egyptian, German, French, and Australian comic art also enriches this innovative collection. Accessible to students of history at all levels, Comic empires is a major addition to the world-leading ‘Studies in imperialism’ series, while standing alone as an innovative and significant contribution to the ever-growing field of comics studies.

Abstract only
Maverick Victorian Cartoonist

Marie Duval: Maverick Victorian cartoonist offers the first critical appraisal of the work of Marie Duval (Isabelle Émilie de Tessier [1847–90]), one of the most unusual, pioneering and visionary cartoonists of the later nineteenth century.

Taking a critical theory approach, the book discusses key themes and practices of Duval’s vision and production, relative to the wider historic social, cultural and economic environments in which her work was made, distributed and read. It identifies Duval as an exemplary radical practitioner in an urban media environment, in which new professional definitions were being created, and in which new congruence between performance, illustration, narrative drawing and novels emerged. The book divides into two sections: Work and Depicting and Performing, interrogating the relationships between the developing practices and the developing forms of the visual cultures of print, story-telling, drawing and stage performance. On one hand, the book focuses on the creation of new types of work by women and gendered questions of authorship in the attribution of work, and on the other, the book highlights the style of Duval’s drawings relative to both the visual conventions of theatre production and the significance of the visualisation of amateurism and vulgarity. The book pays critical attention to Duval the practitioner and to her work, establishing her as a unique but exemplary figure in the foundational development of a culture of print, visualisation and narrative drawing in English, in a transformational period of the nineteenth century.

Abstract only
Ilan Danjoux

POLITICAL CARTOONS are cultural products inseparable from their production environment. Few dispute that the political, economic and organizational structures imprint themselves on their content and style. As Darby (1983: 114) explains: ‘The context in which [a cartoonist] operates, whether defined as his nation or the newspaper for which he works, provides him with both themes and

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Thomas Nast and the colonisation of the American West
Fiona Halloran

legal concept requiring an ‘other’, cartoons, too, participate in the process of creating and policing identity. In their drawings cartoonists assert a reality intended both to comment on and shape national discourse. Their perspectives can illuminate dominant ideas about colonisation and ancillary, oppositional voices. Indeed, the cartoonists’ tendency to subvert the conventional wisdom makes them ideal commentators on national efforts like colonisation. Portraying native people as hunters, carefully delineating their clothing and bearing from

in Comic empires
Ilan Danjoux

took place outside of Denmark and only months after the cartoons first appeared. Compared to the boycotts of Danish products, attacks on Danish embassies and consulates in Syria, Beirut and Iran, and the million dollar bounties for the murder of cartoonists and editors by Pakistani cleric Maulana Yousef Oureshi, the protests and petitions of the Danish Muslim community appear muted. In an interview

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Chris Williams

4 Cartooning the rise of Labour, 1900–21 Chris Williams Sir David Low (1891–1963) has a claim to be considered the most original and influential political cartoonist of the twentieth century. In his autobiography he explains that, as a teenager, he met the Labour politician Keir Hardie when Hardie visited New Zealand in 1907.1 After a spell working in Australia, Low migrated to Britain in 1919. Instinctively radical in his politics, the young cartoonist was dismayed by what he found in the mother country: In the Parliament of 1920, Labour was only the fag-end of

in The art of the possible
Roger Sabin

to think of as ‘real’. It was a weekly publication, with twelve pages, in black and white, and sold for twopence, which was a penny less than Punch . Over time, it would generate cheap spin-off almanacs, annuals and a line of book-format volumes, which sold for one shilling (Adcock 2010a ). The magazine lasted until 1907, and in the period that Duval was there (1869–85) boasted a more-than-solid array of contributors, including cartoonists like William Boucher, Archibald Chasemore, Adelaide Claxton, Percy Cruikshank (nephew of George, who

in Marie Duval