No more ‘Australia for the White Man’

When Sir Frank Packer took over the Sydney-based Bulletin magazine in late 1960, he handed editorship to Donald Horne. The first thing Horne did was to take the slogan ‘Australia for the White Man’ off the banner. This removal was not merely cosmetic, because Horne was determined to refashion the symbolic organ of White Australian cultural nationalism in a new internationalist way. While Horne's politics at the time were Cold War libertarian, he was already a maverick, and showed this by hiring Les Tanner as chief cartoonist and art director

in Comic empires
Performing popular culture at the Crystal Palace c.1900

4 The armless artist and the lightning cartoonist: performing popular culture at the Crystal Palace c.1900 Ann Roberts Discussions of art at the Crystal Palace have largely focused on historic sculpture and architecture contained in its Fine Arts Courts. Exemplified by the series of official guides produced by the Crystal Palace Company from 1854, its commitment to ‘preserve the high moral and educational tone’ of the original Hyde Park enterprise is clear.1 The Palace’s General Manager, Henry Gillman, for example, writing in the 1899 General Guide to the

in After 1851
Abstract only
Imperialism in cartoons, caricature, and satirical art

Comic empires is a unique collection of new research exploring the relationship between imperialism and cartoons, caricature, and satirical art. Edited by leading scholars across both fields, the volume provides new perspectives on well-known events, and also illuminates little-known players in the ‘great game’ of empire. It contains contributions from noted as well as emerging experts. Keren Zdafee and Stefanie Wichhart both examine Egypt (in the turbulent 1930s and during the Suez Crisis, respectively); David Olds and Robert Phiddian explore the decolonisation of cartooning in Australia from the 1960s. Fiona Halloran, the foremost expert on Thomas Nast (1840–1902), examines his engagement with US westward expansion. The overseas imperialism of the United States is analysed by Albert D. Pionke and Frederick Whiting, as well as Stephen Tuffnell. Shaoqian Zhang takes a close look at Chinese and Japanese propagandising during the conflict of 1937–1945; and David Lockwood interrogates the attitudes of David Low (1891–1963) towards British India. Some of the finest comic art of the period is deployed as evidence, and examined seriously – in its own right – for the first time. Readers will find cartoons on subjects as diverse as the Pacific, Cuba, and Cyprus, from Punch, Judge, and Puck. Egyptian, German, French, and Australian comic art also enriches this innovative collection. Accessible to students of history at all levels, Comic empires is a major addition to the world-leading ‘Studies in imperialism’ series, while standing alone as an innovative and significant contribution to the ever-growing field of comics studies.

Abstract only

POLITICAL CARTOONS are cultural products inseparable from their production environment. Few dispute that the political, economic and organizational structures imprint themselves on their content and style. As Darby (1983: 114) explains: ‘The context in which [a cartoonist] operates, whether defined as his nation or the newspaper for which he works, provides him with both themes and

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

took place outside of Denmark and only months after the cartoons first appeared. Compared to the boycotts of Danish products, attacks on Danish embassies and consulates in Syria, Beirut and Iran, and the million dollar bounties for the murder of cartoonists and editors by Pakistani cleric Maulana Yousef Oureshi, the protests and petitions of the Danish Muslim community appear muted. In an interview

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Thomas Nast and the colonisation of the American West

legal concept requiring an ‘other’, cartoons, too, participate in the process of creating and policing identity. In their drawings cartoonists assert a reality intended both to comment on and shape national discourse. Their perspectives can illuminate dominant ideas about colonisation and ancillary, oppositional voices. Indeed, the cartoonists’ tendency to subvert the conventional wisdom makes them ideal commentators on national efforts like colonisation. Portraying native people as hunters, carefully delineating their clothing and bearing from

in Comic empires

4 Cartooning the rise of Labour, 1900–21 Chris Williams Sir David Low (1891–1963) has a claim to be considered the most original and influential political cartoonist of the twentieth century. In his autobiography he explains that, as a teenager, he met the Labour politician Keir Hardie when Hardie visited New Zealand in 1907.1 After a spell working in Australia, Low migrated to Britain in 1919. Instinctively radical in his politics, the young cartoonist was dismayed by what he found in the mother country: In the Parliament of 1920, Labour was only the fag-end of

in The art of the possible

In the midst of the Suez Crisis, cartoonist Pol Ferjac created a series of cartoons for the French humour weekly Le Canard enchaîné with the caption ‘Nil novi’, or ‘Nothing new under the sun’. The message was clear: to western observers, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser's nationalisation of the Suez Canal was another instance of aggressive expansionism that conjured up memories of Hitler in the 1930s. This slogan would have resonated with Egyptian observers as well, for a very different reason: they saw the western response to the

in Comic empires

perceived strategic importance to British Middle East defence policy. What views did Punch and its cartoonists, traditionally critical of imperialism, take of this violent episode during the end of empire? Did it support the Conservative government's policies and propaganda efforts, or was it critical of them? This chapter, by focusing on the six Punch cartoons on the Cyprus ‘emergency’, shows that although Punch had not lost its humour it had lost its acerbic radical critical thinking. The historiography of the Cyprus ‘emergency’, from 1955 to

in Comic empires
Linley Sambourne, Punch, and imperial allegory

By the closing decades of the nineteenth century, Punch 's leading topical cartoonists, John Tenniel and Linley Sambourne, were able to select from a well-established lexicon of figurative conventions (to which they had themselves contributed) for picturing global politics. 1 Nation-states, for example, might readily be represented by caricatures of their monarchs or principal statesmen; equally, however, they might be embodied in classicised female personifications like Britannia or Columbia

in Comic empires