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Ilan Danjoux

OVER THE COURSE of this research, people with whom I have discussed this project have sent me links and news of cartoons, comics, graphic novels, children books and even animated movies. This flood of support made me realize how difficult it can be to distinguish political cartoons from caricatures, paintings or doodles. Caricature is a quintessential feature of the editorial

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

FEW PEOPLE appreciate the skill required to read political cartoons. Unlike the background information that accompanies newspaper articles or the captions that frame newspaper photographs, editorial cartoons provide readers few identifiers or descriptors needed to identify new actors or concepts. Instead, cartoons use a combination of physical distortion, cultural references and visual

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Abstract only
Ilan Danjoux

A QUINTESSENTIAL FEATURE of political cartoons is their ability to reduce a complex situation into a binary clash of interests. Politics become a battle of opposites, where good fights evil, outsiders threaten insiders and victims resist oppressors. The most articulate and detailed newspaper report cannot match the clarity of political cartoons, simply because real life is

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
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Ilan Danjoux

POLITICAL CARTOONS are cultural products inseparable from their production environment. Few dispute that the political, economic and organizational structures imprint themselves on their content and style. As Darby (1983: 114) explains: ‘The context in which [a cartoonist] operates, whether defined as his nation or the newspaper for which he works, provides him with both themes and

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Author: Ilan Danjoux

Cartoon analysis is the study of a non-elite communication. Ilan Danjoux examined over 1200 Israeli and Palestinian editorial cartoons to explore whether changes in their content anticipated the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada in October of 2000. Political Cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict provide readers an engaging introduction to cartoon analysis and a novel insight into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Conflict researchers benefit from paying attention to popular fears because they influence the policies of career-minded politicians and autocratic leaders seeking to placate domestic dissent. The book begins by outlining the rationale for this research project, while explaining the choice of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a case study. It identifies the challenges of cartoon research and outlines the methodological approaches available to researchers. After laying the framework for this study, the book details the collapse of the Israel-Palestinian Peace Process into full-scale violence by October 2000. A description of Israeli and Palestinian media production follows. The book demonstrates the cartoon's ability to chronicle changes in conflict. Not only did both Israeli and Palestinian cartoons change their focus with the outbreak of violence, the mood of cartoons also shifted. It also shows that Israeli and Palestinian cartoons also changed the way that each portrayed the other. Changes in both Israeli and Palestinian cartoons corresponded with, but did not precede, the outbreak of the Al-Aqsa Intifada.

Ilan Danjoux

from members of the Islamic community were cited as the reason for an emergent self-censorship among potential illustrators. For Rose, this was an unacceptable erosion of free speech that should not go unchallenged. 1 Illustrators were given few guidelines upon being invited to submit images of Mohammed. This was evident in the eclectic mix of messages and styles of the twelve cartoons that were

in Political cartoons and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Word and image in Chicago Surrealism
Joanna Pawlik

Cartooning the marvelous: word and image in Chicago Surrealism Joanna Pawlik In December 1965 Franklin Rosemont and his wife Penelope travelled to Paris to meet André Breton and the Parisian group of Surrealists. The young Americans from the mid-West stayed for five months, participating in the daily meetings of the circle, which were held between six and eight at the café on Promenade de Vénus.1 The visit testified to the Rosemonts’ burgeoning interest in Surrealism and they returned to Chicago with Breton’s blessing to start the first organised group of

in Mixed messages
Chris Williams

4 Cartooning the rise of Labour, 1900–21 Chris Williams Sir David Low (1891–1963) has a claim to be considered the most original and influential political cartoonist of the twentieth century. In his autobiography he explains that, as a teenager, he met the Labour politician Keir Hardie when Hardie visited New Zealand in 1907.1 After a spell working in Australia, Low migrated to Britain in 1919. Instinctively radical in his politics, the young cartoonist was dismayed by what he found in the mother country: In the Parliament of 1920, Labour was only the fag-end of

in The art of the possible
Shaoqian Zhang

This chapter examines the media war unleashed on the Chinese population by the forces of Japan and China during the Second Sino-Japanese War of 1937–1945; comprising one of the essential steps in Japan's military expansion and imperialist strategy. It opens with the Marco Polo Bridge Incident in 1937, which precipitated the official outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War, and ends with the surrender of Japan at the end of the Pacific War (1941–1945). Precisely, this chapter compares and contrasts mass-produced wartime cartoon posters

in Comic empires
Stefanie Wichhart

In the midst of the Suez Crisis, cartoonist Pol Ferjac created a series of cartoons for the French humour weekly Le Canard enchaîné with the caption ‘Nil novi’, or ‘Nothing new under the sun’. The message was clear: to western observers, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser's nationalisation of the Suez Canal was another instance of aggressive expansionism that conjured up memories of Hitler in the 1930s. This slogan would have resonated with Egyptian observers as well, for a very different reason: they saw the western response to the

in Comic empires