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Catholicism, gender and ethnicity in nineteenth-century Scotland
Author: S. Karly Kehoe

This book examines the changing nature of Catholicism in modern Scotland by placing a significant emphasis on women religious. It highlights the defining role they played in the transformation and modernisation of the Catholic Church as it struggled to cope with unprecedented levels of Irish migration. The institutions and care-networks that these women established represented a new age in social welfare that served to connect the church with Scotland's emerging civil society. The book examines how the church reacted to liberalism, legislative reform, the rise of evangelicalism and the continued growth of Irish migration between the late 1820s and the late 1850s. A mutual aversion to the Irish and a loyalty to nation and state inspired a recusant and ultramontane laity to invest heavily in a programme of church transformation and development. The recruitment of the Ursulines of Jesus, the first community of nuns to return to Scotland since the Reformation, is highlighted as a significant step towards legitimising Catholic respectability. The book focuses on the recruitment and influence of women religious. It also focuses on the issue of identity by considering how gender and ethnicity influenced the development of these religious communities and how this was connected with the broader campaign to transform Catholic culture in Scotland. The book also examines the development of Catholic education in Scotland between the late 1840s and 1900 and prioritises the role played by women religious in this process.

S. Karly Kehoe

kept growing and the state was becoming increasingly concerned with expanding its authority over education.2 The publication of Pope Pius IX’s Quanta Cura in 1864 represented an official attack on liberalism and one of its key points was the necessity of providing a religious-run Catholic education system.3 It denounced the concept of ‘liberty of conscience and worship [as] each man’s personal right’ and argued against ‘absolute liberty . . . restrained by no authority whether ecclesiastical or civil’.4 It was an attempt to thwart the secularising effect that liberal

in Creating a Scottish Church
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S. Karly Kehoe

attacking liberalism, and in it he declared the idea of legally proclaiming ‘liberty of conscience and worship [as] each man’s personal right’ to be as erroneous as the notion of giving people ‘absolute liberty . . . restrained by no authority whether ecclesiastical or civil’.24 Thus the 1853 Catholic-Liberal coalition that had succeeded in restoring the Catholic hierarchy in the Netherlands had broken down by 1870 and, influenced by Quanta Cura, the break had been led by clerics who focused on the autonomy of Catholic education.25 The reason why liberalism and

in Creating a Scottish Church
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Carmen M. Mangion

temporarily for a chapel’.21 Teaching congregations from the continent and Ireland were entreated by Catholic bishops and clergy to initiate foundations in England. Approximately seventy per cent of the women’s religious institutes located in England and Wales had education as a primary focus in the nineteenth century.22 Although religious education was certainly an important aspect of Catholic education, the English bishops convened at that First Provincial Synod were adamant that secular education should be ‘modern’ and competitive with that in non-Catholic schools.23 The

in Contested identities
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Irish nationalism, the rise of Labour and the Catholic Herald, 1888–1918
Joan Allen

instructed the migrant Irish to prioritise the nationalist cause over the struggle for Catholic education, employment and wages, and welfare provision.1 These political shifts are difficult to disentangle from the eventual breakdown of the ‘progressive alliance’, as trade unionists and a diverse group of socialists sought to express their newfound confidence in an independent political party. As electoral ties with the Liberal Party began to lose purchase, the onset of the First World War accelerated a range of social and political pressures that proved to be particularly

in The British Labour Party and twentieth-century Ireland
Willem Frijhoff

:53 EDUCATIONAL STRATEGY OF DUTCH CATHOLICS 61 declared itself to be the Old Catholic Church, in true apostolic succession, and continued on an autonomous track. Soon two other bishops were elected for the restored dioceses of Haarlem and Deventer, in order to safeguard the traditional rules of episcopal consecration and ensure continuity.14 The creation of a semi-national church conflicted, of course, with the prevailing option of Catholic education abroad, because the foreign educational institutions attended by Dutch Catholics were always under the final supervision of the

in College communities abroad
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Author: Steve Blandford

This is the first book-length study of one of the most significant of all British television writers, Jimmy McGovern. The book provides comprehensive coverage of all his work for television including early writing on Brookside, major documentary dramas such as Hillsborough and Sunday and more recent series such as The Street and Accused.

Whilst the book is firmly focused on McGovern’s own work, the range of his output over the period in which he has been working also provides something of an overview of the radical changes in television drama commissioning that have taken place during this time. Without compromising his deeply-held convictions McGovern has managed to adapt to an ever changing environment, often using his position as a sought-after writer to defy industry trends.

The book also challenges the notion of McGovern as an uncomplicated social realist in stylistic terms. Looking particularly at his later work, a case is made for McGovern employing a greater range of narrative approaches, albeit subtly and within boundaries that allow him to continue to write for large popular audiences.

Finally it is worth pointing to the book’s examination of McGovern’s role in recent years as a mentor to new voices, frequently acting as a creative producer on series that he part-writes and part brings through different less-experienced names.

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S. Karly Kehoe

in this process and in the active mission of the church as a cultural and religious institution. In Scotland, as in Ireland, religion was an instrument of imperialism and Britain’s imagined identity was grounded in a Protestant union, with Scotland’s identity being anchored to Presbyterianism. Given this context, the fact that Catholicism was used as an imperialist tool might be surprising, but it was the only way for church and state authorities to incorporate the Irish. The development of a Catholic education system was a partnership between the Catholic Church

in Creating a Scottish Church
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Karin Fischer

the wider political and public debate, although he devotes a significant part of the book to Catholic education and church views.8 Its international focus is limited to a descriptive overview of existing practice in other European countries, with the implication that Ireland should find its own path in this diversity of practices, rather than to a critical analysis of these situations from an international, rights-based perspective. The author seems 6 6 S chools and the politics of religion and diversity to distance himself from the concept of democracy by

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
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D. A. J. MacPherson

Orangewomen of England, Scotland and Canada were adept, then, at performing seemingly conventional gender roles in their Orange activism, caring for and nurturing future generations, while playing a significant, and public, role in the life of their community. This performance of gender norms also characterised Orangewomen’s activism outside of the Order. Orangewomen’s intervention in education authority elections in 1920s Scotland, or in raising money for an ‘Orange Hut’ for wounded servicemen during the First World War, or campaigning against Catholic education in

in Women and the Orange Order