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Mervyn Busteed

3 • The Catholic Church It is generally agreed that the Catholic Church played a highly significant role in almost every dimension of the life of Irish migrants in nineteenthcentury Britain.1 Nonetheless, two caveats should be borne in mind. First, whilst a good deal of attention will be focused on the social, cultural and political impact of the church, its prime self-defined function was spiritual, namely to preach its version of the Christian message and provide the faithful with opportunities for worship, spiritual solace, instruction and guidance.2 Second

in The Irish in Manchester c. 1750–1921
R. Scott Spurlock

Chapter 12 . The laity and the structure of the Catholic Church in early modern Scotland R. Scott Spurlock S tructurally the Catholic Church in Scotland had been more or less undone by the 1570s, although during the 1580s and into the 1590s the possibility of a violent Catholic Counter-Reformation seemed plausible to some clerics.1 While leading nobility and gentry, including Maxwell, Huntly and Errol, were implicated (most frequently by political rivals) in Jesuit encouraged plots to overthrow the Scottish government with Spanish help, as the probability of

in Insular Christianity
Author:

This book provides a review and consideration of the role of the Catholic Church in Ireland in the intense political and social changes after 1879 through a major figure in Irish history, Michael Logue. Despite being a figure of pivotal historical importance in Ireland, no substantial study of Michael Logue (1840–1924) has previously been undertaken. Exploring previously under-researched areas, such as the clash between science and faith, university education and state-building, the book contributes to our understanding of the relationship between the Church and the state in modern Ireland. It also sets out to redress any historical misunderstanding of Michael Logue and provides a fresh perspective on existing interpretations of the role of the Church and on areas of historical debate in this period.

David Geiringer

historical setting, but a composite part of a ‘liberationist’ climate. Investigating Catholic women’s sexual experience Throughout the history of the Catholic Church, the meaning and function of sex had been considered to be trans-historical, prescribed by the strictures of natural law. That the Church’s definition of sexuality could be shaped by human intervention represented a

in The Pope and the pill
Breda Gray

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 55 3 Migrant integration and the ‘network-making power’ of the Irish Catholic Church Breda Gray Introduction In this chapter I discuss the Irish Catholic Church as both a bureaucratic hierarchal institution and transnational network that promotes migrant integration and welfare via ‘network-making power’ (Castells, 2009, 2011). The Catholic Church has always channelled flows of religious values, information and people. However, my focus here is on the network-making power of the Irish Catholic Church in shaping the

in Migrations
Marie Keenan

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 99 10 Sexual abuse and the Catholic Church Marie Keenan The revelations of the Cloyne report have brought the Government, Irish Catholics and the Vatican to an unprecedented juncture. It’s fair to say that after the Ryan and Murphy Reports Ireland is, perhaps, unshockable when it comes to the abuse of children. But Cloyne has proved to be of a different order. Because for the first time in Ireland, a report into child sexual-abuse exposes an attempt by the Holy See, to frustrate an Inquiry in

in Are the Irish different?
S. Karly Kehoe

1 Scotland’s Catholic Church before emancipation For much of the period between the Reformation and the nineteenth century, Catholicism existed on the periphery of Scottish society, its survival fraught with uncertainty in an atmosphere of institutionalised anti-Catholicism and extreme poverty. The Scottish Mission, a term used to describe the Catholic Church in Scotland between 1603 and 1878, when it had no formal governing hierarchy, had been thrown into complete disarray by the Reformation. Those who remained Catholics went underground, keeping their

in Creating a Scottish Church
Brian Mac Cuarta

parts of Gaelic Scotland – provided that preachers were sent to convert them. Yet by the outbreak of the rising in 1641–42, the Roman Catholic Church was so strong that its prelates and clergy soon replaced the Church of Ireland personnel as the de facto ecclesiastical establishment in those large areas of mid- and west Ulster under Irish military control. This transformation demands exploration, for Catholic life has been a neglected corner in the field of recent plantation scholarship. 2 It is well known that the lack of any serious Protestant engagement with

in The plantation of Ulster
Brian DeGrazia

This chapter focuses on two distinguishing features of HIV/AIDS in Italy, and their intersection: the prevalence of HIV transmission via intravenous drug use in Italy, and the interventions of the Catholic Church. It uses as a case study the controversial founding by Caritas of an AIDS care centre in Rome in 1988, to serve young current or former heroin users who lacked a stable home. There is also an important international context in that the controversy that delayed the opening of the centre coincided with the passing of stricter drug legislation in the USA and the visit of Italian Socialist Party Secretary Bettino Craxi to New York and Washington to discuss related matters. Craxi soon introduced similar legislation into Italian parliament. The confluence of these events and their conflation in government and media discourse alike, this chapter argues, affected attitudes towards the care centre, and led to the effective criminalisation of HIV/AIDS in Italy.

The sources cited and analysed to reconstruct this history include print and audio-visual media from both Italy and the USA. These sources highlight Italy’s concern for its image on the international stage; the ‘activism’ of Caritas and the counter-activism of neighbourhood residents; the fears of these residents of social contagion and drug use in their wealthy area; and how all of these factors contributed to the construction of an aetiology that posited intravenous drug users as the ur-sources of HIV, outside the bounds of ‘normal’ society and the traditional Italian family.

in Histories of HIV/AIDS in Western Europe
Andrew Unsworth

5 The Vatican, Islam and Muslim–Christian relations Andrew Unsworth The encounter between the Catholic church and Islam has a long history and has given rise to a well developed tradition of theological reƪection.1 Since the Second Vatican Council (1962–65)2 relations between the two traditions have grown and intensiƤed as the global encounter between Christianity and Islam has expanded. The Catholic church has engaged in a wide range of dialogical encounters with Islam on a number of signiƤcant issues, and at many diơerent levels of engagement, such as

in Christian responses to Islam