During the Second World War, over 9,000 men from several colonies, protectorates and mandate territories fought for the British Empire. These forces represented a significant shift in naval policy towards the recruitment of colonial manpower at a time of distinct pressures on British imperialism. This book examines the impact of colonial naval forces, by analyzing the 'official' and 'subaltern' sources in the United Kingdom, the Caribbean, East Africa, Southeast Asia and Hong Kong. The Trinidad Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (TRNVR) was formed to defend the island's oil supply to British oil-fired ships. The book also looks at the experience of the Cayman Islanders who volunteered to serve in the TRNVR. An East African case study focuses on Kenya and Zanzibar before and after the Second World War. The Kenya Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (KRNVR) was the first colonial naval force in the British Empire; local naval forces were also formed in Zanzibar and Tanganyika. In the analysis of Southeast Asia and the Malacca Straits, the book discusses, inter alia, origins of Malaya's naval forces, and analyses the issues of force expansion and 'Malaysianisation' during the Malayan Emergency and decolonisation. There was an initial reluctance on the Navy to recruit the Chinese, but with their overwhelming majority in Hong Kong, their enlistment in the Hong Kong Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (HKRNVR) was unavoidable. The post-war evolution of Hong Kong's naval force as it adjusted to the roles of Communist China's emergence and Britain's declining world are also examined.

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reinforcing imperial hierarchies; and debates regarding the post-war imperial mission of the local Navy, centring on issues of Caribbean politics, prestige and prejudice. When the TRNVR extended recruitment across the Caribbean, it raised issues around the status of different West Indian groups, with the British exhibiting particular preference for Cayman Islanders. 52 Chapter Three therefore provides

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
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possibilities such association offered, considering that ‘as a potential source of seamen for the Auxiliary Patrol Service, these ready-made sailors seem to justify every encouragement’. 81 Subsequent visits reaffirmed the opinion that ‘the Cayman Islanders … would make fine material on which to draw in time of war, in the same way as the Newfoundland fishermen were in the last war’. 82

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Race, indigenous naval recruitment and British colonialism, 1934–41

appointment of Allen Wolsey Cardinall, commissioner of the Cayman Islands between 1934 and 1941, which promoted the colony’s sailors in the eyes of the Admiralty.52 An official who ‘takes a great interest in the Native customs and habits’, he recognised and institutionalised the island’s maritime heritage in the aid of economic and social progress. He put the Caymans Islands on the regional map by founding an annual sailing regatta in January 1935, which attracted competitors from across the West Indies and America, as well as the Royal Navy who recognised that ‘Cayman

in A new naval history
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The Empire Marketing Board, 1926–1933

demonstrated the unique position that the Board occupied. Modern business definitions of marketing emphasise the relentless effort to integrate research, production, advertising, selling and distribution in pursuit of a given market sector: the EMB believed that the ‘logic’ of the market could (and on occasion should) be ignored. 84 In this instance, it was unconvinced that the Cayman Islanders’ plan to export turtle soup would prove popular, but believed it had a duty to assist their efforts regardless. Moreover, while the Empire was absent from the press barons’ campaign

in Public relations and the making of modern Britain