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Clemence’s resistance, Asquith’s betrayal
Jill Liddington

17 After census night: Clemence’s resistance, Asquith’s betrayal On Monday 3 April, enumerators collected in their schedules and reported to their Registrars. So it might seem precipitate for the press to report on the boycott. Yet newspaper readers expected something on the census to read at their breakfast tables and on their tube journeys to work. The press obliged, the tabloids reluctant to waste any exciting photo opportunity. Monday’s Daily Mirror front page was devoted to census night over the headline: ‘Numbering the Nation: Suffragettes suffer great

in Vanishing for the vote
Jill Liddington

7 The Census Bill and the boycott plan By February 1910, Asquith’s government was living hand to mouth: Irish MPs demanded Home Rule, while ministers wanted to get Lloyd George’s Finance Bill passed. Other legislation seemed far less contentious by comparison. John Burns’s LGB needed to get its bill through Parliament in time to plan the April 1911 census. After a lengthy hiatus while the General Election results became clear, the Census Committee could at last resume its deliberations. The four key civil servants got into their stride again: Mallet as

in Vanishing for the vote
Suffrage, citizenship and the battle for the census
Author:

On census night, 2 April 1911, Asquith's Liberal government, which still denied women the vote, ordered every household to comply with its census requirements. So suffragette organizations urged women, all still unenfranchised, to boycott this census. Many did. Some inscribed their census schedules with the words ‘No Vote, No Census’. Others evaded the enumerator by sheltering in darkened houses ~ or, in the case of Emily Wilding Davison, by hiding inside a cupboard within the Houses of Parliament. Yet many decided against boycotting. Even some suffragettes, who might have been expected to rebel, decided to comply with the census ~ and handed over a perfectly accurate schedule. Why? The book investigates the ‘battle for the census’ arguments that raged across Edwardian England in spring 1911. It explores why many committed campaigners decided this act of civil disobedience would be highly effective propaganda; and why many others decided to prioritize providing the government with accurate census data for its health and welfare reforms, rather than ‘Votes for Women’. This book is based upon a wealth of brand new documentary sources, which can be read in the participants’ own hand. Interrogating this dramatic new evidence, the book sheds crucial new light on the turbulent world of Edwardian politics. It includes a substantial Gazetteer of 500 campaigners’ census schedules, compiled jointly with Elizabeth Crawford.

A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

a third and final element making journalists more dependent on humanitarian organisations: the weakness of the data produced by Congolese institutions – mapping and demographic data, in particular. The DRC has not conducted a general population census since 1984. 14 In contrast, the NGOs’ data collection capacities – combined with the rapidly growing number of collaborative mapping tools – has made it possible to produce maps and numbers invaluable to reporters

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Brendan T. Lawson

. Harrell-Bond (1992 : 211–12) provides a two-point explanation as to why this is the case. First, she explains that ‘refugee survival usually depends on mobility, either for employment, households’ dependent on remittances, and for more basic forms of self-sufficiency which involve living off the land – all of which resist census taking’. Second, refugees will manipulate assistance systems. For example, ‘false registration of family members who are temporarily or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan
and
Otto Farkas

-fears-for-safety-of-civilians-during-battle-for-mosul (accessed 20 October 2016) . Amnesty International ( 2016b ), ‘ Horrific Attack on UN Aid Convoy Is a Flagrant Violation of International Law’ , www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2016/09/syria-horrific-attack-on-un-aid-convoy-is-a-flagrant-violation-of-international-law (accessed 20 October 2016) . BBS ( 2014 ), Slum Census 2014 & Health and Morbidity Status

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

This book introduces the reader to emerging research in the broad field of 'imperial migration' and shows how this 'new' migration scholarship had developed our understanding of the British World. This is done through an analysis of some of former colonies of British Empire such as Australia, Canada, India and Zambia. The book focuses on the ideas of Reverend Thomas Malthus of how population movements presaged forces within sectors of a pre-industrial economy. The formation of national and imperial identities along racial lines in the mid-nineteenth century is covered by an analysis of the mid-nineteenth century British censuses. The clergy played a pivotal role in the importation and diffusion of a sense of British identity (and morality) to Australian churchgoers. The resistance and accommodation of Welsh Presbyterianism in Eastern Bengal is investigated through the varieties of engagement with Indian Christians and non-Christians. The book argues that Asian migration and the perceived threat it posed to the settler colonies was an issue which could unite these seemingly incongruent elements of the British World. Child migration has become a very sensitive and politically charged issue, and the book examines one of the lesser studied child migration agencies, the Middlemore Children's Emigration Homes. The book also deals with the cultural cross-currents in the construction of an Anglo-Canadian or 'Britannic' national identity. The white settlers' decisions to stay on after independence was granted to Zambia are instructive as it fills an important gap in our understanding of Africa's colonial legacy.

Census versus women’s citizenship
Jill Liddington

10 Battleground for democracy: census versus women’s citizenship By early March, the main battalions were ranged upon the battleground for democracy. On one side stood the Pankhursts’ WSPU, Charlotte Despard’s WFL, alongside Laurence Housman and pressure groups like the WTRL. On the other, Sadler and Scott lined up behind John Burns’s Census Act. Both sides of this ‘census versus citizenship’ fight would hone their arguments during March, with other groups and individuals, occupations and regions each forming their own views. By now, the Census Committee was so

in Vanishing for the vote
Jill Liddington

14 Annie Kenney’s Bristol and Mary Blathwayt’s Bath To help peer into boycotters’ domestic spaces behind their formal census schedules, Henry Nevinson’s diary, Clemence Housman’s letters and Laurence’s own autobiography provide revealing personal testimony. For the large west of England region, the autobiography of chief WSPU organizer Annie Kenney, Memories of a Militant (1924), can be consulted. However, Annie, while the central actor-­observer of Bristol’s census boycott, wrote her faux naïf recollections selectively, telling us more about travelling to

in Vanishing for the vote
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Sweeping back down from Teesside to Thames
Jill Liddington

16 English journey: sweeping back down from Teesside to Thames The diaries of Henry Nevinson and the Blathwayts, the Housmans’ correspondence, plus Jessie Stephenson’s autobiographical typescript and Hannah Mitchell’s published memoir – such evidence is as precious as it is rare. For most local communities, there is sadly little personal testimony to supplement the census schedules themselves, and only limited press coverage. Yet we need to look more widely across England than these four case studies, to visit a more representative range of local communities

in Vanishing for the vote