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Society, allegory and gender
Author: S. H. Rigby

This book on Geoffrey Chaucer explores the relationship between Chaucer's poetry and the change and conflict characteristic of his day and the sorts of literary and non-literary conventions that were at his disposal for making sense of the society around him. Critics who consider the social meaning of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales fall into two main schools: those who present his social thought as an expression of the dominant spirit or ideology of his day and those who see Chaucer as possessing a more heterodox voice. Many of the present generation of Chaucer critics have been trained either as 'Robertsonians' or as 'Donaldsonians'. For D. W. Robertson, even those medieval poems which do not explicitly address religious issues were frequently intended to promote the Augustinian doctrine of charity beneath a pleasing surface; for E. Talbot Donaldson, there are 'no such poems in Middle English'. The book sets out the basics of the Augustinian doctrine of charity and of medieval allegorical theory and examines 'patristic' interpretations of Chaucer's work, particularly of the 'Nun's Priest Tale'. It looks at the humanist alternative to the patristic method and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the patristic approach. The book also outlines some of the major medieval discourses about sexual difference which inform Chaucer's depiction of women, in particular, the tendency of medieval writers to polarise their views of women, condemning them to the pit or elevating them to the pedestal.

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The problem of exemplary shame
Mary C. Flannery

's Physician remarks of Virginia that ‘[s]hamefast she was in maydens shamefastnesse’ ( The Physician’s Tale 55), a peculiarly tautological observation that defines Virginia in terms of her emotional practice: her sense of shame is so finely tuned that it directs her virtuous behaviour and renders her secure (‘fast’) against the threat of dishonour. But Chaucer's poetry repeatedly suggests that honourable female shamefastness conflicts with the expectations of hardy masculinity, leaving honourable women no choice other than that of dying to be chaste. As

in Practising shame