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Author: Brian Baker

This book is a comprehensive critical introduction to one of the most original contemporary British writers, providing an overview of all of Iain Sinclair's major works and an analysis of his vision of modern London. It places Sinclair in a range of contexts, including: the late 1960s counter-culture and the British Poetry Revival; London's underground histories; the rise and fall of Thatcherism; and Sinclair's writing about Britain under New Labour and Sinclair's connection to other writers and artists, such as J.G. Ballard, Michael Moorcock and Marc Atkins. The book contributes to the growing scholarship surrounding Sinclair's work, covering in detail his poetry, fiction, non-fiction (including his book on John Clare, Edge of the Orison), and his film work. Using a generally chronological structure, it traces the on-going themes in Sinclair's writing, such as the uncovering of lost histories of London, the influence of visionary writings, and the importance of walking in the city, and more recent developments in his texts, such as the focus on spaces outside of London and his filmic collaborations with Chris Petit. The book provides a critically informed discussion of Sinclair's work using a variety of approaches.

Phil Wickham

Jarman, with whom he worked on four occasions: The Tempest (1979), The Last of England (1985 co-produced with James Mackay), War Requiem (1989) and a segment of the opera portmanteau film Aria (1987). Secondly, I will look in detail at his work as executive producer on Chris Petit’s film An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1982). I will be using resources from Don Boyd’s archive at The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum at the University of Exeter, where I am the curator. Lastly, I will look at some of Boyd’s recent work running the web platform HiBROW, which produces

in British art cinema
Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state
Author: Shivdeep Grewal

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

Creativity, experimentation and innovation
Paul Newland and Brian Hoyle

, Fassbinder, Schroeter and a host of others, but here it is quite likely you may not have heard of Peter Watkins, Bill Douglas, Robina Rose, Terence Davies, Chris Petit, Ron Peck – and forgive me if I include myself – who are their counterparts. 29 British art cinema: Creativity, experimentation and innovation largely agrees with the sentiments expressed by Anderson and Jarman. This book seeks to help redress the critical neglect of British art cinema by arguing that it is a highly significant strand of the nation’s film culture. But this has not

in British art cinema
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British journeys
Paul Newland

travels from London to Newcastle in order to investigate events surrounding his brother’s death. He discovers that his niece, Doreen (Petra Markham), has been forced into appearing in a pornographic film. Chris Petit’s film Radio On (1979) is also obliquely concerned with a pornography racket, this time in Bristol. And Lindsay Anderson’s O Lucky Man! (1973) makes it clear that a love of porn exists beneath the veneer of contemporary British respectability. It is Radio On and O Lucky Man! I shall be exploring primarily in this chapter. But here I am interested more

in British films of the 1970s
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Brian Baker

, including Slow Chocolate Autopsy (which contains ‘graphic stories’ in collaboration with Dave McKean), and also Sinclair’s films with Chris Petit. In The Verbals , Sinclair indicates that he has always been interested in cinema, and particularly filmmaking, having attended a film school in London and then taught film in an art college in Walthamstow (where Brian Catling was one of his students). In Chapter 2 I noted the importance of Stan Brakhage’s films to the idea of autopsy (‘seeing with one’s own eyes’) in Lud Heat and White Chappell , and in this chapter I

in Iain Sinclair
Brian Baker

characterises it as a deliberate evacuation of space (place) and time (history) in order to replace it with a malign and artificial consumerist experience. The spatial memories of place are overlaid by a blank ‘caul’; cultural memories and practices of everyday life are overwritten and countermanded by contemporary configurations of power, manifested in microcosmic form in the Dome. Blood and oil In the film London Orbital (co-directed with Chris Petit), Sinclair states explicitly of the M25 project: ‘we were walking to

in Iain Sinclair
Interview with Patrick Keiller
Paul Newland

, although in this the chapters are listed more conventionally. The map also appears in the book The Possibility of Life’s Survival on the Planet [London: Tate Publishing, 2012], which accompanied the Tate Britain exhibition.’ 7 Iain Sinclair and Chris Petit, London Orbital (London: Granta, 2002). 8 Doreen Massey, ‘Landscape, space, politics:  an essay’ (n.d.), https://​thefutureoflandscape.wordpress.com/​landscapespacepolitics-​an-​essay (accessed 14 April 2015).

in British rural landscapes on film
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A Channel 4 experiment 1982–85
John Ellis

, and refused to appear on any Channel 4 talk show. The series tried to address the present moment, but at the same time remain resolutely different. As the series developed, this difference became more marked in the aesthetic of the items in the programmes. The predominantly documentary or direct address format of these early programmes began to give way to a more idiosyncratic approach: a moody essay on Wenders by Chris Petit; an item on Syberberg’s film of Wagner’s Parsifal that managed to include marionettes; a screening of Jean-Luc Godard’s mediation on his own

in Experimental British television
Shivdeep Grewal

were frowned on by Machiavelli (1970: 77). Dandyism is often associated with decadent strains of Anglo-American and French literature. Though a detailed treatment is beyond the scope of the present study, the following writers – a far from comprehensive survey, to be sure – offer insights into the topic, whether as practitioners, theoreticians or observers: Lord Byron, Oscar Wilde, William Burroughs, J.G. Ballard, Chris Petit (specifically, the eponymous character from his novel Robinson , 1993), William Gibson (Peter

in Habermas and European integration