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Welsh Presbyterianism in Sylhet, Eastern Bengal, 1860–1940
Aled Jones

to the Bengali plains the existing Welsh mission field in the Khasi Hills to the north established by Thomas Jones twenty years earlier. 18 Pryse and those who followed him quickly found that as well as competing against each other, Christian missions were also obliged to address powerful evangelical missionary activity from both Hindu and Islamic movements, and struggled for dominance among an

in Empire, migration and identity in the British world

This book introduces the reader to emerging research in the broad field of 'imperial migration' and shows how this 'new' migration scholarship had developed our understanding of the British World. This is done through an analysis of some of former colonies of British Empire such as Australia, Canada, India and Zambia. The book focuses on the ideas of Reverend Thomas Malthus of how population movements presaged forces within sectors of a pre-industrial economy. The formation of national and imperial identities along racial lines in the mid-nineteenth century is covered by an analysis of the mid-nineteenth century British censuses. The clergy played a pivotal role in the importation and diffusion of a sense of British identity (and morality) to Australian churchgoers. The resistance and accommodation of Welsh Presbyterianism in Eastern Bengal is investigated through the varieties of engagement with Indian Christians and non-Christians. The book argues that Asian migration and the perceived threat it posed to the settler colonies was an issue which could unite these seemingly incongruent elements of the British World. Child migration has become a very sensitive and politically charged issue, and the book examines one of the lesser studied child migration agencies, the Middlemore Children's Emigration Homes. The book also deals with the cultural cross-currents in the construction of an Anglo-Canadian or 'Britannic' national identity. The white settlers' decisions to stay on after independence was granted to Zambia are instructive as it fills an important gap in our understanding of Africa's colonial legacy.

A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

Mission), an international Christian mission that has operated in Liberia since 1952. Bibliography Abramowitz , S. ( 2017 ), ‘ Epidemics (Especially Ebola) ’, Annual Review of Anthropology , 46 , 421 – 45 , doi: 10.1146/annurev-anthro-102116-041616 . Abramowitz , S. , McKune , S. L

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Michael D. Leigh

second, an injunction that no missionary could enter the country if a suitably qualified Burmese citizen (of the same faith) was available to do the work. 44 During the early 1950s the additional criteria were tested in a trio of cases in Kachin State. The first involved the Yunnan Tibetan Christian Mission (YTCM). Two senior YTCM missionaries, Rev. David Rees and Rev. Robert Morse, had inadvertently contravened the 1948 Secret Memorandum. A young couple, both YTCM church members, had committed adultery and eloped. They

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
Kate Bowan and Paul A. Pickering

the Temperance movement more widely, it used popular song, familiar classical music and the hymn as important parts of its repertoire of action in pursuit of its moral and evangelical crusades. After examining the uses of music in the WCTU, thereby taking account of the close interactions that occurred between its New Zealand branches and Māori women, we will look at some Christian missions in detail

in Sounds of liberty
Abstract only
Emily J. Manktelow

history of this cultural, material and spiritual encounter. This book explores both the institutional and the intimate history of the missionary family. This is not a project many historians of Christian mission have pursued, and although there are some notable exceptions, mission historians tend to operate within a system of assumed knowledge: that is, we all think we know about the missionary family (after all, it is a constant background presence in the writings and ruminations of the missionaries themselves), but without a

in Missionary families
Abstract only
Michael D. Leigh

mission stations as ‘essays in colonisation’ and Stephen Neill described missionaries as ‘instruments of Western infiltration’. When Jean and John Comaroff linked Christian missions with European colonisation they were accused of breathing new life into the ‘corpse of the missionary as imperialist’. Susan Thorne discovered the familiar ‘colonial practices’ of wage differentials and discriminatory rules at the very heart of missionary activity. It prompts questions about Wesleyan mission stations in Upper Burma. Were they also

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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Mobilities, networks and the making of colonial medical culture
Markku Hokkanen

Livingstonia highlights key aspects of medicine, mobility and networks in the imperial world. Its establishment as an impressive site for health, healing and medical education was a powerful demonstration of the capacities of Western medicine, Christian mission and the British Empire. Livingstonia was a crucial nexus for a number of networks that criss-crossed Malawi, Southern Africa and the empire. Both in

in Medicine, mobility and the empire
Abstract only
Emily J. Manktelow

what we mustn’t do is let our discomfort with this state of affairs stop us from engaging with the public (on the one hand), and from investigating fruitful avenues of analysis on the other. This is what has happened when it comes to missionary families – discomfort with the past and continuing calls for public heroisation has led us to ignore the role of the intimate, the personal and the emotional in the history of Christian mission. As this book has shown, this has had profound implications for our understanding of the

in Missionary families
Jennifer Lloyd

’s grandson, eventually set up an independent Bible Christian mission. Soon the two men were taking tea with Malpas and Todd every Wednesday, when they sang hymns accompanied by Lois on the harmonium, and Lois and Samuel shared trips to the temples on the nearby lake. By the following year Lois and Samuel were engaged, but almost immediately separated when she and Todd moved north to Chungking (Chongquing), possibly for Todd’s health, and Thorne travelled to Chao Tung (Zhaotong) to open a mission station. After a year’s engagement Lois Malpas married Samuel Thorne and moved

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism