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Theory and practice

Considering how to communicate your research or engage others with the latest science, social science or humanities research? This book explores new and emerging approaches to engaging people with research, placing these in the wider context of research communication. Split into three sections, Creative Research Communication explores the historical routes and current drivers for public engagement, before moving on to explore practical approaches and finally discussing ethical issues and the ways in which research communication can contribute to research impact.

Starting from the premise that researchers can and ought to participate in the public sphere, this book provides practical guidance and advice on contributing to political discourse and policymaking, as well as engaging the public where they are (whether that is at the theatre, at a music festival or on social media). By considering the plurality of publics and their diverse needs and interests, it is quite possible to find a communications niche that neither offers up bite-sized chunks of research, nor conceptualises the public as lacking the capacity to consider the myriad of issues raised by research, but explains and considers thoughtfully the value of research endeavours and their potential benefits to society.

It’s time for researchers to move away from one-size fits all, and embrace opportunities for creative approaches to research communication. This book argues for a move away from metrics and tick box approaches and towards approaches that work for you, as an individual researcher, in the context of your own discipline and interests.

Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

Internationally, public engagement and communication has become an important aspect of research and policymaking, allowing research establishments, and their researchers, to explore public perspectives on their work as well as providing access to research findings to wider publics. Alongside this, a considerable research communication and public engagement community has emerged, who are interested not only in the design, techniques and methods for research communication and engagement but also approaches to communicating creatively and evaluating the

in Creative research communication
Tower houses and waterways
Victoria L. McAlister

Tower houses created and sustained diverse economic networks. In particular, this was accomplished through siting on communication routes, especially water based, and interaction with transport networks. A significant proportion of transport and communication occurred via water in later medieval Ireland. Not only was this cheaper than land-based transport, but it helped navigate politically unstable territories, since protection and effort could focus on specific places. It was also a response to Ireland's topography, which in many

in The Irish tower house
James Zborowski

3 Communication, love and death ‘In this world’, wrote Kenneth Burke, ‘communication is never an absolute’, before adding in parentheses that ‘only angels communicate absolutely’.1 ‘Since Augustine at least’, suggests John Durham Peters, ‘angels have been the epitome of perfect communication, a model of how we would talk if we had no obstructions’.2 The most extended topic of discussion in this chapter will be the representation of the often-troubled communication of two heterosexual romantic pairs from two classical Hollywood films: Only Angels Have Wings and

in Classical Hollywood cinema
Andreas Antoniades

3396 Producing globalisation 29/9/09 11:15 Page 9 1 Hegemonic discourse communication The aim of this chapter is to offer a theoretical framework for studying and understanding hegemonic discourses and their function and effects. It is suggested that the domination of a hegemonic discourse signifies a complex communication process that directly involves national discursive realities, domestic institutional arrangements and agents/subjects. Therefore what is under scrutiny in this chapter is this communication process itself, in order to illustrate what this

in Producing globalisation
Antonia Lucia Dawes

encountering an ever-increasing complexity of human movement, global heterogeneity and attendant racist responses. In order to examine this more closely, the chapter connects histories of culture and communication in the city to the contemporary, multilingual dynamics of the ever-evolving street markets where I did my fieldwork. This is, of necessity, a selective account that considers social and political histories of the city as they relate to the question of talk and language use. Unification and colonialism: forging an Italian language and people Antonio Gramsci

in Race talk
Mel Bunce

basic concepts about critical thinking vastly outperformed the control group at a series of scenario-based tests. They were more likely to reject arguments based on anecdote and raise doubts about health cures that had not been scientifically tested. Finally, news outlets and NGOs need to commit to accurate reporting and campaigning. There can be a strong temptation for journalists and communication teams to provide exaggerated or sensationalist accounts. This content can come from a good place – it reflects a utilitarian ethic in which

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Chris A. Williams

5 Real-time communication 1848–1945 Electronic communications could greatly speed up the various processes of feedback and of control in police organisations. Their use therein was just one aspect of the way that in the nineteenth century they (in Dandeker’s words) ‘unified national populations across time-space’.1 This chapter will examine the ways that telegraph and telephone technology were adopted by police in the nineteenth century, noting how these technologies both fitted into existing practice and re-shaped it. These will also be shown in the context of

in Police control systems in Britain, 1775–1975
Working-class male leisure and ‘good’ citizenship between the wars
Brad Beaven

6 The era of mass communication: workingclass male leisure and ‘good’ citizenship between the wars M ass commercial leisure came of age between the wars. A visit to at least one mass commercial leisure venue, be it a football match, music hall or cinema, had by 1939 become an important weekend ritual for many working men.1 Since professional sport and the music hall had their foundations in Victorian society, contemporary observers tended to divert their critical gaze towards the new technological developments that could dispense ‘popular’ leisure to an

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Bringing lessons from the past
Laura Fernández de Mosteyrín

(PEN-LCRV) 1 was approved in 2015. It is currently in early implementation stages with most activity falling within the field of rhetoric and communication. Exploring the reasons behind the delay in implementation of this programme in comparison to neighbouring countries, and the strategy’s focus on ‘communicating’ as a priority, sheds light on specificities present in Spain and on global diffusion of CVE. Therein lie the reasons for policy paradigm transfer ( Rose, 2004 ) combined with policy learning, too ( Hall, 1993 ). In fact, changes in Spanish CT dating from

in Encountering extremism