Search results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • "Community sport" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All

Drawing on nearly a decade of wide-ranging, multidisciplinary research undertaken with young people and adults living and working in urban communities in Zambia, this jointly-authored book extends existing understandings of the use of sport to contribute to global development agendas has burgeoned over the last two decades. The book’s locally-centred and contextualized analysis represents an important departure from both the internationalist and evaluation-orientated research that has predominated in global sport for development. Offering wide-ranging historical, political, economic and social contextualization, it examines how a key period in the expansion of the sport for development sector unfolded in Zambia; considers the significance of varying degrees of integration and partnership practices between sport for development and development agencies at different levels; and outlines approaches to the provision of sport for development activities in various communities. Detailed examination of the lives, experiences and responses of young people involved in these activities, drawn from their own accounts, is a key feature of the book. Concluding reflections identify possibilities for enhancing understanding and improving research and evidence through methodologies which ‘localise global sport for development’. The book’s unique approach and content will be highly relevant to academic researchers and students studying sport and development across many different contexts.

Iain Lindsey
,
Tess Kay
,
Ruth Jeanes
, and
Davies Banda

take part in competitions and leagues, some of which are organized on an inter-community or city-wide basis by these same SfD NGOs. In addition to extending community sport provision by instigating these activities, SfD organizations also initiate or contribute to developing performance pathways for participants to compete at higher levels. During the time of our research, EduSport and Sport in Action were able to offer particularly talented

in Localizing global sport for development
Vanessa Heggie

introduction pointed out, this is problematic in a very practical sense, as even designing infrastructure which will suit both elite and community sport is extremely challenging. And the British sports medicine community admits that there is very little evidence that major sporting events have any long-term positive impact on community health. 43 But it is also problematic in an ideological sense, where we are still trying to map the elite athletic body not only onto the body public, but also onto the ‘healthy body’ from which it is concurrently being disassociated (at

in A history of British sports medicine
Martin Atherton

deaf community’, Sport in History 27, 2: 276–292 Atherton et al., Deaf United BDN, 1985, p. 45 Atherton et al., Deaf United Atherton et al., Deaf United Wilson, T.C., ‘The paradox of social class and sports involvement: the roles of cultural and economic capital’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport 37, 1 (2002), pp. 5–16 See Wilson, J., ‘Leisure in the welfare state’ in C. Critcher P. Brahman and A. Tomlinson (eds), Sociology of leisure (London: E & FN Spon, 1995), pp. 216–221; G. Whannel, ‘Sport and the state’ in Critcher et al., Sociology of leisure

in Deafness, community and culture in Britain
Vanessa Heggie

equipment, physiological adaptations in the body, and so on. Yet in the 1970s and 1980s the focus (at least in terms of finance and political support) seemed to be shifting away from the elite performer, and back towards community sport, physical education, and the general body of the public. This was probably the first time that the government in Britain had taken such a close interest in the physical activity of its electorate in peace time, or at least without direct connections to the fitness of a population upon which military strength depended. It is not the

in A history of British sports medicine
Olympics and legacies
Maurice Roche

Mega-events and urban development 157 Table 5.1  Summer Olympic Games’ impacts on host cities Primary modernisation phase: nineteenth century to 1970 Secondary modernisation phase: 1970 to present Urban development catalyst: sport facilities complexes; transport and communication infrastructures;new communities Sport facilities impacts Urban development catalyst 1900 Paris 1896 Athens 1960 Rome 1972 Munich – 1904 St Louis 1908 London 1964 Tokyo 1976 Montreal Cost problem 1948 London 1912 Stockholm 1920 Antwerp 1980 Moscow – 1984 Los Angeles

in Mega-events and social change
Iain Lindsey
,
Tess Kay
,
Ruth Jeanes
, and
Davies Banda

help prevent diseases that impede people from working and impose health care costs on individuals and communities Sport can help reduce stigma and increase self-esteem, self-confidence and social skills, leading to increased employability MDG2: Achieve Universal Primary Education School sport programs motivate children to enrol in and attend school and can help improve academic achievement Sport-based community

in Localizing global sport for development
Vanessa Heggie

., 196. 102 For earlier European interventions, see M Atherton, ‘Sport in the British Deaf CommunitySport in History 27 ( 2007 ), 276–92; D Séguillon, ‘The Origins and Consequences of the First World Games for the Deaf: Paris, 1924’ International Journal of the History of Sport 19 ( 2002 ), 119–32. 103 Scruton, Stoke Mandeville , p. 290. 104 S Bailey, Athlete First: A History of the Paralympic Movement (Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2008 ). 105 These reactions were not limited to the UK. See the account of physical training programmes in

in A history of British sports medicine
Abstract only
Peter Davies
and
Robert Light

viewed as being instrumental in maintaining the morale of the troops on the frontline. So cricket did its bit. As a community sport – perhaps the best example of such – it was at the forefront of local, charitable efforts. After the war Wigglesworth has assessed the significance of the Second World War for sport in Britain. He argues that the war, and victory in it, increased the confidence of the ‘public school establishment’, and thus, their ‘Corinthian emphasis on team games’ was enhanced.158 In a different sense, he also claims that the war led to a

in Cricket and community in England