Search results

The Cypriot Mule corps, imperial loyalty and silenced memory

Most Cypriots and British today do not know that Cypriots even served in the Great War. This book contributes to the growing literature on the role of the British non-settler empire in the Great War by exploring the service of the Cypriot Mule Corps on the Salonica Front, and after the war in Constantinople. This book speaks to a number of interlocking historiographies, contributing to various debates especially around enlistment/volunteerism, imperial loyalty and veterans' issues. At the most basic level, it reconstructs the story of Cypriot Mule Corps' contribution, of transporting wounded men and supplies to the front, across steep mountains, with dangerous ravines and in extreme climates. The book argues that Cypriot mules and mule drivers played a pivotal role in British logistics in Salonica and Constantinople, especially the former. It explores the impact of the war on Cypriot socio-economic conditions, particularly of so many men serving abroad on the local economy and society. The issues that arose for the British in relation to the contracts they offered the Cypriots, contracts offered to the muleteers, and problems of implementing the promise of an allotment scheme are also discussed. Behavioural problems one finds with military corps, such as desertion and crime, were not prevalent in the Cypriot Mule Corps. The book also explores the impact of death and incapacity on veterans and dependants, looking at issues that veterans faced after returning and resettling into Cypriot life.

Andrekos Varnava

, but crime was not rife. Most muleteers were well behaved or got away with it. The nature and incidence of criminal behaviour reflected the harsh conditions in Salonica and the different circumstances in Constantinople, as well as the high rate of violence in Cyprus itself. Chapter 1 showed how there is little literature on how and why soldiers misbehaved during their service

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Greeks and Saracens inGuy of Warwick
Rebecca Wilcox

pit Guy against several different Eastern antagonists. Structurally, Guy’s adventures in the East comprise the centre of each half of the romance; in the first half, Guy falls in love with his lord’s daughter, Felice; in order to win her affection he sets off to fight tournaments in Europe and repeatedly emerges the champion. Guy then travels to Constantinople to protect the Christian emperor Ernis from Saracen invaders. He is again victorious, successfully repulsing both the Saracens and Ernis’ attempts to marry Guy to his daughter, Clarice. Guy returns to England

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Humanitarianism and the Victorian diplomat
Michelle Tusan

April 1877 upon hearing of Austen Henry Layard’s appointment as Ambassador to Constantinople. The elevation of the adventurer-turned-politician to top diplomat worried Gladstone. He believed that Layard would do little to promote civil and legal reform in the Ottoman Empire, a cause that the former prime minister argued should comprise a centrepiece of British diplomacy. Gladstone personally had led the

in The cultural construction of the British world
Abstract only
West and east of Suez, 1840–45
Freda Harcourt

the other to act as a feeder to the main line. This was the Constantinople branch, opened in 1845. It was to be an important part of P&O’s trade for the next few years. The Constantinople branch In the summer of 1840, when the MDs were preparing for P&O’s advent in the Mediterranean, they considered how best to make the Alexandria line profitable and to guard the company

in Flagships of imperialism
Abstract only
Andrekos Varnava

the gap’. The reader may ask, Who cares about a group of Cypriot mule drivers and a handful of interpreters in the British army serving in Macedonia and Constantinople during and immediately following the Great War? The importance is not merely in that nobody has written about them. This should be important to Cypriots, who have a highly nationalistic view of their past that excludes ‘the other’ and

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Open Access (free)
A bird’s eye view of intervention with emphasis on Britain, 1875–78
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

of mayhem with some sixty towns and villages in ashes and a staggering number of massacred women and children, which came to be known in Europe as the ‘Bulgarian atrocities’. Reasonable estimates of dead vary from 12,000 to 30,000. The first figure was suggested in the report by the British consul Walter Baring (who had been sent from Constantinople to assess the situation), who, though pro-Ottoman, came out with a scathing indictment of the behaviour of the irregulars

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Andrekos Varnava

, such as Andreas Sava, who later died in Constantinople serving in the 121st Company. 33 Eassie observed that most of the mules were good, but several were poor and a third were unclipped and needed attention. In the last six months 70 mules had been evacuated for debility, a large number because there were 400 mules in this company in April 1917. 34 The other two companies, the 842nd and 843rd had

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Andrekos Varnava

The district commissioner of Paphos, Arthur Charles Tompkins, emphasised her poverty. 26 But the authorities in Constantinople could not trace Yanni as deceased because of ‘all records of muleteers having been destroyed’. 27 But Tompkins had documents showing that Yanni had enlisted at Limassol, left in November 1917, died on 24 February 1918, and his wife had his medal. 28 Stevenson advised the military

in Serving the empire in the Great War
Andrekos Varnava

, to Georgios Adamou (his next of kin on the honour roll), enlisted on 9 May 1918, the month he turned 18, and served until 28 May 1919 in both Salonica and Constantinople. 1 Family history is important. It helps us understand who we are and where we and our ancestors came from, yet it can only go so far in providing meaning to our lives, unless it is understood alongside the experiences of others and

in Serving the empire in the Great War