Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 207 items for :

  • "Corn Laws" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Popular politicians in the age of reform, 1810–67

Celebrities, heroes and champions explores the role of the popular politician across a range of political movements and wider British and Irish society from the Napoleonic Wars to the Second Reform Act of 1867. Encompassing the parliamentary reform movements of Francis Burdett, Henry Hunt and the Chartists; Daniel O’Connell’s campaigns for Catholic Emancipation and Repeal of the Union; the transatlantic anti-slavery movement; and the Anti-Corn Law League, it offers a rare comparative perspective on the popular politics of the time. It examines the construction and dissemination of public reputations, as well as the impact of fame on those individuals and their dependents. Building on recent developments in the study of historical and contemporary fame, it argues that popular politicians were revered as heroes by their followers and became personally synonymous with both the aims and values of the causes they espoused. However, through the commercialisation of their images and the burgeoning markets for information and entertainment, they also became part of an international culture of celebrity, encapsulated by the rapturous receptions accorded to the romantic continental revolutionaries Lajos Kossuth and Giuseppe Garibaldi.

The Tories after 1997
Editors: and

The Conservative Party's survival as a significant political force was now open to serious question for the first time since the crisis over the Corn Laws. The Labour Party has commanded a fairly consistent level of attention, whether in office or in opposition. But it seems that the Conservatives are fated to be regarded either as unavoidable or irrelevant. This book presents an analysis that suggests that the party leader plays a less important role in Conservative recoveries than a distinctive policy programme and an effective party organization. It examines the Conservative position on a series of key issues, highlighting the difficult dilemmas which confronted the party after 1997, notably on economic policy. New Labour's acceptance of much of the main thrust of Thatcherite economic policy threw the Conservatives off balance. The pragmatism of this new position and the 'In Europe, not run by Europe' platform masked a significant move towards Euro-skepticism. The book also traces how the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Parties adapted to the creation of the Scottish Parliament, exploring the re-organisation of the Scottish party, its electoral fortunes and political prospects in the new Scottish politics. It examines issues of identity and nationhood in Conservative politics in the 1997-2001 period, focusing on the 'English Question' and the politics of 'race'. The predictable results of the Conservatives' failure to develop an attractive, consistent narrative are then analysed. Right-wing populist parties with charismatic leaders enjoyed some electoral success under the proportional representation systems in 2002.

The religion of free trade and the making of modern consumerism
Peter Gurney

7 ‘The Sublime of the Bazaar’: the religion of free trade and the making of modern consumerism Early in 1844, Richard Cobden, accompanied by Robert Moore and Peronnet Thompson, visited Harriet Martineau on her sick bed at Tynemouth. Cobden’s intention was to persuade Martineau to use her considerable propagandist powers to further the cause of the Anti-Corn Law League. He proved persuasive and the first result was Dawn Island, a short novella published in a special edition and sold at the great National Anti-Corn Law League Bazaar held at the Covent Garden

in Wanting and having
The path to renown
Simon James Morgan

Abraham Paulton propelled himself to the forefront of the anti-Corn Law campaign after an impromptu debut at a meeting in Bolton. 50 The formidable oratorical powers of Frederick Douglass, destined to become the most famous fugitive from American slavery, were ‘discovered’ by the white abolitionists of New England when he was encouraged to address an anti-slavery convention at the whaling port of Nantucket in 1841. 51 In a society where the spoken word was valued at least as much as the written, these were important abilities; as radicalism became more and more a

in Celebrities, heroes and champions
The politics of consumption in England during the ‘Hungry Forties’
Peter Gurney

Law League such as Charles Villiers and Richard Cobden poured scorn on Marsham, the latter warning the House of Commons: ‘There are 7,000,000 or 8,000,000 of people without wheaten bread. If the people continue to descend in the scale of physical comfort, and to eat potatoes, the hope of moral improvement which the friends of humanity indulge, must be altogether disappointed.’2 Thomas Carlyle also intervened, hinting ominously that the Corn Law controversy could have far wider repercussions than was generally appreciated: ‘When two millions of one’s brother-men sit

in Wanting and having
Abstract only
Simon James Morgan

system of Chartist lecturing also promoted lesser figures, with several of the more important, such as Vincent, achieving national fame. The Anti-Corn Law League (ACLL) is usually seen as more centralised and bureaucratic than Chartism, and is often referred to as a ‘machine’ or ‘engine’. 12 Activities such as the production and distribution of propaganda, the co-ordination of petitioning, and electoral registration became highly organised and sophisticated. 13 Chartism, on the other hand, is often portrayed more as an expression of material circumstance, a ‘knife

in Celebrities, heroes and champions
Simon James Morgan

counterproductive, allowing its victims to seize the moral high ground and further secure their position within the movement. The chapter concludes with a detailed case study of how the lecturers of the Anti-Corn Law League (ACLL) employed these strategies at the micro level to gain the trust of agricultural labourers in the heartlands of rural protectionism in the early years of the movement. Championing The currency of the ‘people’s friend’ in popular politics dated back at least to the early years of the French Revolution, when Mirabeau emerged as the French corollary of

in Celebrities, heroes and champions
Abstract only
Political group portraiture and history painting
Henry Miller

reform and should be located in the broader context of the time. These early Victorian group portraits commemorated contemporary political events in the style of the grand history paintings of the Hanoverian era. In this vein, there were large group portraits to celebrate the passing of the 1832 Reform Act, the 1840 Anti-Slavery Convention and the repeal of the corn laws in 1846, as well as numerous representations of the cabinets of the time. The most famous example of this genre was Sir George Hayter’s monumental painting of the first meeting of the reformed House of

in Politics personified
Carl J. Griffin

But such a conclusion seems premature given that in the 1840s hunger was ‘rediscovered’ as a political force, the ‘struggle over the representation of scarcity’, as Peter Gurney has put it, being central to the politicking of Anti–Corn Law League (ACLL) and Chartism alike. ‘Hunger’, he continued, ‘had no obvious, straightforward meaning or political effect, but, as in other

in The politics of hunger
Popular radicalism and consumer organising
Peter Gurney

establishment of a self-governing authority based on the broad principle of Equal Rights’.8 After the flight of Thomas Attwood of the Birmingham Political Union and other middle-class radicals, the net widened. Debating with the Anti-Corn Law League lecturer John Finnigan in the autumn of 1840, the Manchester Chartist James ‘Consumers of their own productions’ 147 Leach agreed that the aristocratical Corn Laws were ‘disgraceful’ but also laid the blame for the economic grievances of the labouring poor squarely on the shoulders of groups enfranchised less than a decade

in Wanting and having