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Alex J. Bellamy

3 The Croatian historical statehood narrative In his 1998 state of the nation address, the Croatian President Franjo Tuœman noted that with the restoration of the Croatian Danube region including Vukovar ‘to our homeland’, ‘[t]he centuries-old dream of the Croatian people has thereby been completely fulfilled’.1 Similarly, the new constitution promulgated shortly after independence proclaimed ‘the millennial national identity of the Croatian nation and the continuity of its statehood, confirmed by the course of its entire historical experience in various statal

in The formation of Croatian national identity
The Moslem question in Bosnia-Hercegovina
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter8 16/10/02 8:06 am Page 220 8 ‘Greater Serbia’ and ‘Greater Croatia’: the Moslem question in Bosnia-Hercegovina We live in the borderland between two worlds, on the border between nations, within everybody’s reach, always someone’s scapegoat. Against us the waves of history break, as if against a cliff. (Meša Selimoviš : Dervish and Death)1 I can see that the situation is far more complicated and more difficult than other problems I have seen, even Cambodia. It is the peculiar three-sided nature of the struggle here that makes it so difficult

in Balkan holocausts?
A centuries-old dream?
Author: Alex J. Bellamy

This book assesses the formation of Croatian national identity in the 1990s. It develops a novel framework, calling into question both primordial and modernist approaches to nationalism and national identity, before applying that framework to Croatia. In doing so, the book provides a new way of thinking about how national identity is formed and why it is so important. An explanation is given of how Croatian national identity was formed in the abstract, via a historical narrative that traces centuries of yearning for a national state. The book shows how the government, opposition parties, dissident intellectuals and diaspora groups offered alternative accounts of this narrative in order to legitimise contemporary political programmes based on different versions of national identity. It then looks at how these debates were manifested in social activities as diverse as football, religion, economics and language. This book attempts to make an important contribution to both the way we study nationalism and national identity, and our understanding of post-Yugoslav politics and society.

Alex J. Bellamy

4 Contemporary accounts of Croatian national identity According to Benedict Anderson , ‘communities are to be distinguished, not by their falsity/genuineness, but by the style in which they are imagined’.1 This chapter investigates how the Croatian nation was imagined in the 1990s. It focuses on four sets of accounts that attempted to provide contemporary resonance to the abstract frames of national identity discussed in the previous chapter. These accounts attempted to either interpret what it meant to be Croatian in order to secure support for a political

in The formation of Croatian national identity
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter4 16/10/02 8:04 am Page 98 4 Croatia, ‘Greater Serbianism’, and the conflict between East and West Christ’s remarkable principle: ‘Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them that use and persecute you.’ That selfless sentiment has remained throughout history a cry of the weak, or an expression of those who have accepted their doom . . . No matter how many examples can be found in life and history to support such renunciation, it has never overcome the passions of hatred and the desire to

in Balkan holocausts?
Timothy Edmunds

International factors have played a key role in influencing both the nature and the direction of Croatia’s security sector reform process since 2000. Security assistance programmes to the country have been extensive, and have helped to shape the normative and technical criteria against which security sector reform has been premised. Croatia has

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
Timothy Edmunds

The Croatian security sector faced a number of common organisational level reform challenges in the aftermath of the country’s successful war of independence in 1995. These were primarily a consequence of the war experience itself, as well as the attendant demands associated with establishing the newly independent Croatian state more widely. They

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
Timothy Edmunds

Croatia faced a number of difficult political level security sector reform challenges in early 2000. The death of Franjo Tuđman and the electoral defeat of his HDZ party changed the domestic political landscape entirely. However, the military, police and intelligence agencies were all still deeply partisan actors, institutionally sympathetic towards

in Security sector reform in transforming societies
Alexander Korb

5 The disposal of corpses in an ethnicized civil war: Croatia, 1941–45 1 Alexander Korb Introduction In May 1943, an Italian general who was being held prisoner of war was discussing the course of the war with his colleagues. He was describing an incident that had occurred in the territory occupied by Italy in Croatia and, unknown to him, he was overheard by his British supervisors. The incident concerned the recovery of the corpses of murdered Serbs thrown by the perpetrators – Croatian nationalists – into karst caves, which are typical land formations in that

in Human remains and mass violence
James W. Peterson

instance, this was true of American sympathy for Slovenia and Russia’s long-standing support for Serbia. Similarly, the Yugoslav federation was a kind of artifice throughout its history, and it was no surprise that different political patterns or “types” developed within the various states. For example, Slovenia and eventually Croatia adopted democratic patterns, while the Serb-dominated remnant of

in Defending Eastern Europe