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The avant-garde and its Legacy

In 1909, the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Founding Manifesto of Futurism was published on the front page of Le Figaro. Between 1909 and 1912, the Futurists published works celebrating speed and danger, glorifying war and technology, and advocating political and artistic revolution. In Europe, this avant-garde movement was active in the field of painting and sculpture, theatre, photography and politics. This book reassesses the activities and legacies of Futurism. It looks at Futurist manifestos by linking techniques of promotion with practices in commercial advertising, and exploring the question of how Futurist manifestos address notions of genius and gender. The book also reconstructs the historical, cultural and ideological background of Marinetti's Manifesto del tattilismo. Zurich Dadaists adopted cultural stances heavily indebted to the terms of critical engagement and cultural visibility initiated within the Futurist circle. The book analyses avant-garde's examination of its internal strategies of identity and canonization, and the importance of Futurism for the Pierre Albert-Birot. It charts the details of the argument on simultaneity between Umberto Boccioni and Robert Delaunay, and analyses the critical readings of Fernand Léger's La noce. The dialogue between Occultism and Futurism is explored by discussing the theme of night in the works of the Florentine Futurists. In La cucina futurista, food is separated from its nutritional function, and the act of eating is related to notions of creativity and identity. The book presents unique examples of innovative expressivity in Italian Futurists' free-word poems, and examines poetry celebrating the triumph of modern aviation.

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Dafydd W. Jones

, then, is that we are likely to find ourselves always making up something out of Cravan after our image of the cultural subversive; when our illusions are discerned, however, and if we reject our reliance on restraint to the exclusion of intoxication, then the experiencing and bearing of reality – even through the writing of panegyric – re-enters in our taking of chaos upon ourselves. Notes  1 Hans Richter, Dada: Art and Anti-Art, trans. David Britt (London and New York: Thames and Hudson, 1965), p. 86.  2 From Hans Richter, ‘The Self-Immolation of Arthur Cravan

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
Dafydd Jones

4 La bomba-romanzo esplosivo, or Dada’s burning heart Dafydd Jones Dafydd Jones La bomba-romanzo esplosivo The received wisdom that Futurism was ‘the actual seedbed of Dada art’ is often enough repeated (Winter 1996: 141). Beyond the political, however, the complex problematic nature of the relation between Futurism and Dada is far less frequently addressed, and Dada’s aesthetic negotiation of anti-nationalist politics, for instance, is largely ignored. We know that in rejecting all cultural precedents the Dadaists implicitly rejected Futurism; and they

in Back to the Futurists
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Dafydd W. Jones

Deleuze (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), p. 120. On the plane of immanence, see Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, What is Philosophy?, trans. Graham Burchell and Hugh Tomlinson (London and New York: Verso, 1994), p. 59. 11 Deleuze and Guattari, What is Philosophy?, pp. 61–2. 12 Hans Richter, Dada: Art and Anti-Art, trans. David Britt (London and New York: Thames and Hudson, 1965), p. 86. 13 Daniel W. Smith, ‘Deleuze and the History of Philosophy’, in Smith and Somers-Hall (eds), The Cambridge Companion to Deleuze, p. 23. 14 Gabrielle Buffet

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
Spiritualist phenomena, Dada photomontage, and magic
Leigh Wilson

constructing Dada art as a ‘counterpart to the exactness of photography, a new kind of art that would at once mimic cinema and instantiate the “real situation”’.24 Here too can be seen a tension in just what materiality in art means. The history of thinking about photography focuses in great part on the status of the medium as representation, in particular on the question of whether, in C. S. Peirce’s terms, photography is icon or index, whether its representational mode consists of resembling the world or of physical connection to it.25 The materiality of Hausmann’s speech

in The machine and the ghost
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Spare parts
Elza Adamowicz

body. This study explores the fabrications of the human figure across Dada art, texts, film, manifestos and performances in the context of the tensions and ADAMOWICZ 9781526131140 PRINT (4 col).indd 3 31/01/2019 16:05 4 dada bodies contradictions of the ideological, socio-political and artistic situation across Europe during and after the First World War. Born in Zurich in 1916, at the heart of a war-torn Europe, Dada emerged at a time of social, economic and moral crisis, and of major developments in technology and media culture. It is this period of

in Dada bodies
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Between gas mask and carnival dance
Elza Adamowicz

‘Kandinsky’: ‘The strongest affinity shown in works of art today is with the dread masks of primitive peoples, and with the plague and terror masks of the Peruvians, Australian aborigenes, and Negroes’ (1996: 225). Their exhibitions provide concrete evidence, since tribal art objects were displayed alongside Dada art works, and non-European rhythms and resonances informed Huelsenbeck’s ‘chants nègres’ or Ball’s sound poems.22 But their usage openly overturned the prevailing symbolism of the mask in contemporary European culture, as articulated by Freud when he writes of

in Dada bodies
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The impossible machine
Elza Adamowicz

, Picabia and Jean Crotti sourced their material in mechanical drawings and transformed it, thereby cocking a snook at the widely admired mechanical sphere, by drawing analogies between the machine or its movements and human sexual activity. According to Alexander Partens, in an article titled ‘Dada-Kunst’ (‘Dada art’): ‘An explosive imagination was at work, whereby the most banal and mechanical, caught in a brutal grip, were suddenly filled with a new, alien life in which irony, eroticism, scorn, joy and fatigue resonated curiously’ (1920: 90).5 Irrationalised, feminised

in Dada bodies
Dafydd W. Jones

. 235. 75 Loy, ‘Mexican Desert’, p. 17. 76 Bob Brown, You Gotta Live; cited in Burke, Becoming Modern, p. 264. 77 Cravan, ‘Des paroles’/‘Some Words’, p. 103. 78 Arte y Deportes, 18 October 1918 and 1 November 1918. 79 From Hans Richter, ‘The Self-Immolation of Arthur Cravan’, in Dada: Art and Anti-Art, trans. David Britt (London and New York: Thames and Hudson, 1965), pp. 85–6. 80 Bob Brown, You Gotta Live; cited in Nicholl, Traces Remain, p. 237. 81 Nicholl, Traces Remain, p. 240. The cyclogenesis of the strongest hurricane on record, Hurricane Patricia, with

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
Jacopo Galimberti

activist such as Pablo Echaurren, who is the son of Roberto Matta and who worked at the time for the newspaper Lotta Continua, read primary sources which were by then also available in bookshops and libraries. His main references were Hans Richter’s Dada: arte e antiarte (Dada: art and anti-art), Tristan Tzara’s Manifesti del dadaísmo (Manifestos of Dadaism), Georges Hugnet’s L’avventura Dada (The adventure of Dada) and André Breton’s Manifesti del surrealismo (Manifestos of Surrealism).20 While Potere Operaio’s foray into Surrealism was not repeated, Re Nudo, as well as

in Art, Global Maoism and the Chinese Cultural Revolution