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Intertextuality in the fiction and criticism
Author: Daniela Caselli

This is a study on the literary relation between Beckett and Dante. It is a reading of Samuel Beckett and Dante's works and a critical engagement with contemporary theories of intertextuality. The book gives a reading of Beckett's work, detecting previously unknown quotations, allusions to, and parodies of Dante in Beckett's fiction and criticism. It is aimed at the scholarly communities interested in literatures in English, literary and critical theory, comparative literature and theory, French literature and theory and Italian studies.

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Matthew Arnold’s criticism in Victorian periodicals
Federica Coluzzi

Arnold’s private life and public works that has remained largely unexplored. What kind of ‘flight’ was Arnold’s hermeneutic interest for Dante? Was it short, circular or all encompassing? And how does it stand the challenge of close (textual) analysis? The answers to these questions are conditional to re-evaluating the condition of material fragmentation that characterises his critical discourse on Dante. More substantially

in Dante beyond influence
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Daniela Caselli

Detecting Dante in Joyce The early Beckett essay ‘Dante…Bruno.Vico..Joyce’, was written in 1929 at Joyce’s suggestion about the debt of Work in Progress to Dante, Bruno, and Vico. 1 The essay opens by claiming that ‘the danger is in the neatness of identifications’; such ‘neatness’ can reduce the comparison to ‘a carefully folded hamsandwich’, an act of ‘pigeon-holing’ or of ‘book-keeping’ (19). Rather than limiting the analysis to the passages where ‘explicit illustration’ of one text within another can be

in Beckett’s Dantes
Marginal annotation as private commentary
Federica Coluzzi

On the evening of 16 September 1834, the twenty-five-year-old William E. Gladstone picked up his hard-covered pocket journal to write a ‘skeleton-like’ account of the day spent at Fasque, his family home in Scotland (Foot, 1968–94: xix). Among the noteworthy events, the future British Prime Minister wrote: ‘began Dante’s Commedia, read Canto 1’ (GD [ The Gladstone Diaries ] 18/09/34). As he jotted down the entry in

in Dante beyond influence
Philip H. Wicksteed and Victorian mass readerships
Federica Coluzzi

’ ( Steedman , 2004). By 1918 he had given ‘nearly three hundred extension courses’ on an assorted range of subjects: from Aristotle, Dante and Wordsworth to drama, sociology and economics ( Steedman , 2004). Such tireless activity became vital for his career as a published author. Steedman in the OXDNB entry recognises that Wicksteed was ‘perhaps best-known’ among his contemporaries for his extensive work on ‘Dante and on Dante’s relationship to the

in Dante beyond influence
Rethinking reception in Victorian literary culture

Dante Beyond Influence provides the first systematic inquiry into the formation of the British critical and scholarly discourse on Dante in the late nineteenth century (1865–1921). Overcoming the primacy of literary influence and intertextuality, it instead historicises and conceptualises the hermeneutic turn in British reception history as the product of major transformations in Victorian intellectual, social and publishing history.

The volume unpacks the phenomenology of Victorian dantismo through the analysis of five case studies and the material examination of a newly discovered body of manuscript and print sources. Extending over a sixty-year long period, the book retraces the sophistication of the Victorian modes of readerly and writerly engagement with Dantean textuality. It charts its outward expression as a public criticism circulating in prominent nineteenth-century periodicals and elucidates its wider popularisation (and commodification) through Victorian mass-publishing. It ultimately brings forth the mechanism that led to the specialisation of the scholarly discourse and the academisation of Dante studies in traditional and extramural universities. Drawing on the new disciplines of book history and history of reading, the author provides unprecedented insight into the private intellectual life and public work of Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, William E. Gladstone, and introduces a significant cohort of Dante critics, scholars and learned societies hitherto passed unnoticed.

As it recaptures a long-neglected moment in Dante’s reception history, this path-breaking book illuminates the wider socio-cultural and economic impact that the Victorian hermeneutic turn had in advancing women’s access to literary and scholarly professions, educational reform and discipline formation.

Anne Woolley

than the rest and appears more exuberant; with an expansive gesture she beckons Pippa to join them, her voluptuous figure emphasized by her corseted dress and low neckline. All three sport conspicuous jewellery and have rounder faces with coarser features. Faithful to the poem, the drawing does not allow Pippa more than a sideways look in passing but in placing these opposites together Siddal has shown that neither is exclusive. Each represents an aspect of womanhood and thus an aspect of love, the essence of Dante Rossetti’s artistic and poetic philosophy which

in The poems of Elizabeth Siddal in context
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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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C. H. Herford
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library