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This book offers a new and critical perspective on the global reconciliation technology by highlighting its contingent and highly political character as an authoritative practice of post-conflict peacebuilding. After retracing the emergence of the reconciliation discourse from South Africa to the global level, the book demonstrates how implementing reconciliation in post-conflict societies is a highly political practice which entails potentially undesirable consequences for the post-conflict societies to which it is deployed. Inquiring into the example of Sierra Leone, the book shows how the reconciliation discourse brings about the marginalization and neutralization of political claims and identities of local populations by producing these societies as being composed of the ‘victims’ and ‘perpetrators’ of past human rights violations which are first and foremost in need of reconciliation and healing.

Katy Hayward

M1634 - HAYWARD TEXT.qxp:ANDY Q7 27/1/09 13:23 Page 42 3 Official discourse and political change in Ireland The purpose of this chapter is to elaborate the theoretical and methodological framework for this research, both in relation to the key tenets of discourse theory and to the empirical content of the analysis. It begins by considering the meaning of ‘discourse’ as language, practice and context. Its multidimensional meaning and function means that discourse analysis has particular value in the study of nationalism and political change. The articulation

in Irish nationalism and European integration
Steven Griggs
and
David Howarth

explanation and interpretation (Torfing, 2005: 25). Rather, we employ a ‘thicker’ conception of discourse theory in which discourse does not just consist of an abstract cognitive system of beliefs and words, but is a constitutive dimension of social relations. It does not merely describe or make known a pre-­ existing or underlying reality, but serves partly to bring that reality into being for subjects (Gottweis, 2003: 251). In expounding our approach, we begin by setting out the ontological assumptions of poststructuralist discourse theory, showing how its categories and

in The politics of airport expansion in the United Kingdom
Andreas Antoniades

hegemonic discourses should be conceptualised as an interaction process between two discursive realities: the hegemonic discourses on the one hand, and the public discourses on the other. In order to do so two bodies of literature are combined: comparative institutionalism and discourse theory. The aim is to propose an understanding of hegemonic discourse communication as an integral part of national ideology–production mechanisms. The term integral is crucial here. The aforementioned two discursive realities (the ‘hegemonic’ and the ‘public’) are conceptualised as parts

in Producing globalisation
Judith Renner

, it develops an understanding of discourse which emphasises the power of discourse, thereby making it possible to question the validity and necessity of social reality in general and of reconciliation in particular. Both goals, the chapter argues, can be met with discourse theory. It therefore suggests a discourse theoretical approach to the emergence, hegemonisation and productivity of discourses which is based predominantly - but not

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics
Abstract only
Steven Griggs
and
David Howarth

good one, because we are involved in a conflict of ends which are incommensurable’ (Schön, 1993: 150). As we have intimated, our framing of the politics of aviation in the UK context focuses on the emergence and constitution of aviation as a ‘messy’ or ‘wicked’ policy problem. We also explore the various ways in which British governments and officials, as well as sections of the aviation industry, have sought to resolve this problem. But though frame analysis provides a useful set of tools, we draw more upon poststructuralist discourse theory to problematise and

in The politics of airport expansion in the United Kingdom
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Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.

Discourse, policies, identity

This book is about the language of the European Union’s response to the threat of terrorism: the ‘fight against terrorism’. Since its re-emergence in the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the ‘fight against terrorism’ has come to represent a priority area of action for the European Union (EU). Drawing on interpretive approaches to International Relations, the author outlines a discourse theory of identity and counter-terrorism policy in order to explore the ways in which the EU’s counter-terrorism discourse has been constructed and the ways in which it functions. Importantly, the author shows how the ‘fight against terrorism’ structures the EU response to terrorism through the prism of identity, drawing our attention to the various ‘others’ that have come to form the target of EU counter-terrorism policy. Through an extensive analysis of the wider societal impact of the EU’s ‘fight against terrorism’ discourse, the author reveals the various ways in which EU counter-terrorism policy is contributing to the ‘securitisation’ of social and political life within Europe.

Abstract only
Judith Renner

; secondly, it wants to examine critically its truth claims and empirical performance as a widely accepted social meaning. Both goals, it will be argued below, can be achieved through a discourse theoretical approach. Why discourse? The following chapters rely on discourse theory in order to make their argument. This perspective was chosen for two reasons. Firstly, discourse theory offers theoretical concepts

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics
Abstract only
Judith Renner

research. Merits and implications of the discourse theoretical perspective The preceding chapters argued from the perspective of discourse theory which underpinned this book’s critical point of view on the global quest for reconciliation. Discourse theory, as pointed out in chapter 1 , proceeds from the presumption that humans cannot access their world directly but they can only make sense of their identity and their

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics