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Author: Paul Copeland

At the heart of the European integration process is the political economy debate over whether the EU should be a market-making project, or if it should combine this with integration in employment and social policy. What has been the impact of the 2004 and 2007 rounds of enlargement upon the political economy of European integration? EU enlargement, the clash of capitalisms and the European social dimension analyses the impact of the 2004 and 2007 enlargements upon the politics of European integration within EU employment and social policy. This book analyses the main policy negotiations in the field and analyses the political positions and contributions of the Central and Eastern European Member States. Through an analyses of the negotiations of the Services Directive, the revision of the Working Time Directive and the Europe 2020 poverty target, the book argues that the addition of the Central and Eastern European states has strengthened liberal forces at the EU level and undermined integration with EU employment and social policy.

A theory of distributive justice for the European Union
Author: João Labareda

This highly original book constitutes one of the first attempts to examine the problem of distributive justice in the EU in a systematic manner. The author starts by arguing that the set of shared political institutions at EU level, including the European Parliament and the Court of Justice of the EU, generate democratic duties of redistribution amongst EU citizens. Furthermore, he claims that the economic structure of the EU, comprising a common market, a common currency, and a free-movement area, triggers duties of reciprocity amongst member states. He contends that the responsibilities to fulfil these duties should be shared by three levels of government – local, national, and supranational. More specifically, he argues that the EU should act as a safety net to the national welfare systems, applying the principle of subsidiarity. In turn, the common market and the Eurozone should balance efficiency targets with distributive concerns. Concrete policy proposals presented in this book include a threshold of basic goods for all EU citizens, an EU Labour Code, a minimum EU corporate tax rate, and an EU Fund for Global Competitiveness. These proposals are thoroughly examined from the standpoint of feasibility. The author argues that his proposals fit in the political culture of the member states, are economically feasible, can be translated into functioning institutions and policies, and are consistent with the limited degree of social solidarity in Europe. This book is a major contribution to the understanding of how a just Europe would look and what it takes to get us there.

Scott L. Greer

negative-sum. The chapter then turns to politics, working through the consequences for the EU social policy of subtracting the UK. The loss of the UK is a blow to the northern/eastern liberal bloc in the EU, and will empower France. The consequences for social policy over time might be dramatic. Agenda-setting will change to reflect the new veto players, and what might have been non-decisions might become decisions. Blame-avoidance techniques will change without the UK around to attract blame for liberalization. This should shape the content of policy, not just to

in The European Union after Brexit
Shivdeep Grewal

-portrayed in quite deterministic terms as preconditions for a European welfare regime. At the same time, calls for democratic participation were less common than among members of the GUE-NGL; when ‘politicisation’ 15 or a ‘political Europe’ 16 were mentioned at all, the tone was traditionally social democratic and productivist. Nevertheless, there was concern at the present condition of social Europe: as in Leibfried’s work ( 2005 ; Leibfried and Pierson, 2000 ), this centred on the inadequacy of EU social policy as a response to the erosion of

in Habermas and European integration
David J. Bailey

governance regime. Social policy EU social policy developments during the Great Recession fall into three key areas: labour market regulations, pro-employment policies and anti-poverty initiatives. Each of these, however, have witnessed similar trends to those outlined 244 Towards a social democratic European Union? above, with weak EU-level governance undermining the capacity for more substantive measures that might otherwise have a redistributive or decommodifying effect. In the area of labour market regulations, divisions between member states have continued to limit

in European social democracy during the global economic crisis
Abstract only
Shivdeep Grewal

specific to EU juridification are identified. Successive historical trajectories of continental juridification are then delineated. These are categorised in terms of the ‘neo-Latin’ ideal types developed by Schmitter (1998b: 133–6), rather than Westphalian or imperial models drawn from elsewhere;1 in Schimtter’s terminology, post-Maastricht juridification is found to correspond with the trajectory of condominio. Integration theories such as neofunctionalism are considered in historical context in these closing sections, as is EU social policy. Social evolution TCA sets

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Shivdeep Grewal

quite deterministic terms as preconditions for a European welfare regime. At the same time, calls for democratic participation were less common than among members of the GUE-NGL; when ‘politicisation’15 or a ‘political Europe’16 were mentioned at all, the tone was traditionally social democratic and productivist. Nevertheless, there was concern at the present condition of social Europe: as in Leibfried’s work (2005; Leibfried and Pierson, 2000), this centred on the inadequacy of EU social policy as a response to the erosion of the welfare state. Taken together the GUE

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
Paul Copeland

-on’ or ‘after-thought’ to market integration. There is no transnational European welfare state that either complements or supersedes the social policies of its members. The EU has developed more powers to regulate and coordinate social policy than the redistributive policies found at the national level (Annesley, 2003; Leibfried, 2010; Leibfried and Pierson, 1995). Of the handful of directives that concern EU social policy, the majority have resulted from concerns about preventing a distortion of competition within the Single European Market (SEM) and relate to the

in EU enlargement, the clash of capitalisms and the European social dimension
Abstract only
Shivdeep Grewal

The EU can be thought of as an outcome of juridification. Yet the concept must be adapted if it is to support more than metatheoretical reflection on the integration process. If the aim is an empirical research programme, thought must also be given to the interactions between national, subnational and supranational contexts that distinguish EU juridification from that of the nation-state. In the case of this study, attention is given to ‘Social Europe’, the shifting amalgam of welfare states and EU social policy

in Habermas and European integration
Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state
Author: Shivdeep Grewal

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe