Dale Townshend

This article seeks to provide an account of the political biases at stake in the conceptualisation of medieval English history in Ethelwina, Or The House of Fitz-Auburne (1799), the first fiction of the prolific Gothic romancer-turned-Royal Body Guard T. J. Horsley, Curties. Having considered Curties‘s portrayal of the reign of King Edward III in the narrative in relation to formal historiographies of the period, the article turns to address the politics of Curties‘s appropriation of Shakespeare‘s Hamlet.

Gothic Studies
From minority to tyranny 1377–97

The first twenty years (1377-97) of Richar II's reign was characterised by war and rebellion, show trials, scandalous royalty, horrible murders, attempts to solve the Irish question and the making of England's oldest alliance. This richly-documented period offers exceptional opportunities and challenges to students, and the editor has selected material from a wide range of sources: well-known English chronicles, foreign chronicles, and legal, administrative and financial records. This book describes the complex domestic and international situation which confronted the young king, and offers guidance on the strengths and weaknesses of the reign's leading chronicles. Students of Richard II's reign are blessed with numerous written sources. This reign saw the last great flowering of medieval chronicle-writing.

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The end of Edward III’s reign, 1376–77
Alison K. McHardy

1. Death of the Black Prince, 1376 As he was dying, the Black Prince commended his wife and son to Edward III and Gaunt. Life of the Black Prince by the Herald of Sir John Chandos , ed. M. K. Pope and E. C. Lodge (Oxford, 1910 ), 129. Then he called the king his father And the duke of Lancaster his brother. He

in The reign of Richard II
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Alison K. McHardy

As Edward III lay dying in the summer of 1377, the nation’s mood was anxious and sombre; Edward had ascended the throne early in 1327, so very few of his subjects could remember a time when he was not their king. During his fifty-year reign Edward had restored the prestige and glamour of crown and court at home and abroad, defeated the Scots and humiliated the French. Though his

in The reign of Richard II
Stephen Penn

This chapter contains translations of a selection of shorter documents that were edited by Rudolf Buddensieg for the Wyclif Society in Polemical Works (vols 1 and 2, 1883). On the Noonday Devil is generally held to be the earliest of these, and is normally dated within a short period of the death of Edward III’s eldest son, the Black Prince, on 8 June 1376, which is mentioned in this text. The king himself died only a little over a year later. The other two texts, On the Seven Gifts of the Holy Spirt and On the Loosing of Satan, whose polemic ranges far beyond the very limited scope of On the Noonday Devil, are generally held to have been written towards the end of Wyclif’s life.

in John Wyclif
A conceptual history 1200–1900

This collection explores how concepts of intellectual or learning disability evolved from a range of influences, gradually developing from earlier and decidedly distinct concepts, including ‘idiocy’ and ‘folly’, which were themselves generated by very specific social and intellectual environments. With essays extending across legal, educational, literary, religious, philosophical, and psychiatric histories, this collection maintains a rigorous distinction between historical and contemporary concepts in demonstrating how intellectual disability and related notions were products of the prevailing social, cultural, and intellectual environments in which they took form, and themselves performed important functions within these environments. Focusing on British and European material from the middle ages to the late nineteenth century, this collection asks ‘How and why did these concepts form?’ ‘How did they connect with one another?’ and ‘What historical circumstances contributed to building these connections?’ While the emphasis is on conceptual history or a history of ideas, these essays also address the consequences of these defining forces for the people who found themselves enclosed by the shifting definitional field.

Anthony Musson

examining indictments, and summoning the prior of Llanthony for questioning. 29 Edward III sat in king’s bench for the trial of some of the Folville gang in 1332, but he was especially active in judicial matters during the 1340s and 1350s, scrutinising points and issuing instructions personally using the great seal. 30 Richard II ordered the issue charters of manumission to rebels during the

in Medieval law in context
Anthony Musson

(as in the case of Robert Baynard),11 though after Edward III’s personal assumption of power in the 1330s it became an extremely rare phenomenon.12 The justices of the central courts played an equally important role in provincial justice, not just through the visitations of the eyre, but through their presence on commissions of assize and gaol delivery and on ad hoc commissions of general and special oyer and terminer. From Edward II it was common to find the serjeants and justices of the central courts staffing the assize circuits. In the fourteenth century they

in Judicial tribunals in England and Europe, 1200–1700
Anthony Musson

book: the prohibition on indictors being on the trial jury, for instance, was first raised in 1341 and eventually became law in 1352. This corporate experience is manifest in the statistics based on the re-election of MPs, which became commoner under Edward III than under his predecessors. 57 The speaker was important in focusing the Commons’ deliberations and in their relay to the Crown. The profiles of

in Medieval law in context
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Mark Ormrod, Bart Lambert and Jonathan Mackman

actively resisted the attempts of Edward I and Edward III to bring the kingdom into the Plantagenet orbit, the inhabitants of all the Celtic parts of the British Isles were customarily cast as unworthy, treacherous, irrational, fickle and degenerate. ‘A barbarous, brutal and foolish people’ is how the Scots were described in a Latin poem commemorating the English victory at the battle of Falkirk in 1298. English commentators were also stinging in their assessments of the ‘wild’ Welsh and Irish: ‘May Wales be sunk deep to the Devil!’ exclaimed Peter Langtoft. 12

in Immigrant England, 1300–1550