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Author: John Potvin

This book carefully considers the myriad and complex relationships between queer male masculinity and interior design, material culture and aesthetics in Britain between 1885 and 1957 - that is bachelors of a different sort - through rich, well-chosen case studies. It pays close attention to particular homes and domestic interiors of Lord Ronald Gower, Alfred Taylor, Oscar Wilde, Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts, Edward Perry Warren and John Marshall, Sir Cedric Morris and Arthur Lett-Haines, Noel Coward and Cecil Beaton. The book underscores the discursive history and conceptual parameters of the bachelor as these collided with queer sexualities through social and cultural perceptions. It focuses on the seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor: queerness, idolatry, decadence, askesis, decoration, glamour, and finally, artifice. The seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor comprise a contested site freighted with contradiction, vacillating between and revealing the fraught and distinctly queer twining of shame and resistance. Together the furniture and collections that filled Gower's Windsor home compel us to search out the narratives that bric-a-brac at once enliven and expose well beyond the shadows of the endless and meaningless accumulation that late Victorians were said to been have afflicted by.

Edward Perry Warren and Lewes House
John Potvin

COMMISSI ONED FROM Greek craftsmen in 1-20 CE by a Roman client, the infamous so-called Warren Cup is a rare silver Roman skyphos (drinking cup) depicting explicit sex acts. Purchased by the British Museum for £1.8 million in 1999, the cup acquired its name from its first modern owner, Bostonian collector, antiquarian and Uranian writer Edward Perry Warren (commonly and affectionately nicknamed Ned) (1860–1928) who likely acquired the crowning glory of his collection around 1911. Included amongst the cup’s five sections are depictions of two different scenes

in Bachelors of a different sort
The key role of the Italian antiquarian market in the inception of American Classical art collections during the late-nineteenth century
Francesca de Tomasi

that Helbig was the person they should consult. In 1891 he wrote to Jacobsen: ‘Therefore I don’t fear the European museums so much as the Americans who have only scorn ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 50 03/12/2019 08:56 ‘More for beauty than for rarity’51 3.1  Bronze statue of a camillus donated by H.G. Marquand to the Metropolitan Museum in 1897 (MMA 97.22.25). Public domain image. for entails and the sort. I am, however, assured that they do not yet show much striking power’ (Moltesen, 2012: 161). Thus, Edward Perry Warren (1860–1928), intermediary for the

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Interactional strategies in late-nineteenth-century Classical archaeology: the case of Adolf Furtwängler
Ulf R. Hansson

Furtwängler, among them Conze and Kekulé. But resistance in Berlin was more widespread than that. The British archaeologist John Marshall, who visited Berlin in 1894, reported in a letter to his partner Edward Perry Warren that ‘they hate Furtwängler very much here’ (quoted in Burdett and Goddard, 1941: 187). ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 140 03/12/2019 08:56 ‘More feared than loved’141 And here is where resentment and frustration come to interfere with Furtwängler’s scholarship and interactional strategies vis-à-vis the scholarly community. The deliberately

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
The seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor
John Potvin

, Alfred Taylor, Oscar Wilde, Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts, Edward Perry Warren and John Marshall, Sir Cedric Morris and Arthur Lett-Haines, Noël Coward and Cecil Beaton. In order to best achieve a more holistic portrayal of these men’s practices of design, aesthetics and sexuality, the complete human sensorium is taken into account where possible and plausible to invoke the sounds, sights, smells, touches and tastes of dwelling; one could refer to these as the sensory landscape of identity. These spaces are symptoms of and enable orientation along this landscape

in Bachelors of a different sort
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Cedric Morris, Arthur Lett-Haines and the decorative ideal
John Potvin

altogether. After all, the goal of the school was to continue to provide students with ‘an oasis of decency for artists outside the system’. 76 Another aim of the EASPD was ‘to decrease the division that has grown up between the creative artist and the general public’. 77 Indeed, one and all, were welcome, even students who could ill afford the fees. Morris and Lett provided a queer space not entirely unlike Edward Perry Warren. Although decidedly wealthier, Warren saw to it, like the couple, that the home was opened up to all those who sought out knowledge and community

in Bachelors of a different sort
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Artifice as resistance
John Potvin

fond of a younger student, helping ‘to mould his growing soul – in fact, he shows an almost womanly constructiveness. One is reminded of the way in which the ancient Lacedaemonains [ sic ] exploited Greek Love, expecting the elder to pair not merely to inspirit the younger by means of his affection, but also to instruct him in the art of war.’ 19 Clearly, Edward Perry Warren was not alone in his Victorian-leaning Greek ideal when he published the first volume of his Defence of Uranian Love in 1928, though with very different desired results. 7

in Bachelors of a different sort
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Charles Ricketts, Charles Shannon and the Wilde factor
John Potvin

, a writing after the fact, and is perhaps conceptually adjacent to the spatial metaphor of the proverbial closet. As we have seen in Chapter 1, Forster could only bear to publish and reveal the true source of inspiration for Maurice posthumously. As we will see in the chapter that follows, Edward Perry Warren’s three-volume Uranian tract was partially published posthumously, and significantly behind its time. With Oscar Wilde: Recollections , Ricketts also performed the queer deferral of time, distanced and removed from the sting of Wilde’s prison sentence, near

in Bachelors of a different sort