The Gothic Elsewhere in Jane Austen‘s Emma

In recent criticism, Jane Austen‘s Northanger Abbey has been reconsidered as a comic rather than mock-Gothic novel, shifting its mockery onto a variety of other targets: domineering men, unwary readers, the violence underpinning English domesticity. I argue that Austen continues her engagement with the Gothic, beyond Northanger Abbey, using Emma as an exemplary case. Emma not only includes explicit mentions of Gothic novels such as Ann Radcliffe‘s The Romance of the Forest, but implicitly reformulates the relationships between Female Gothic figures: finding a frail, victimised heroine in Jane Fairfax and a seductive femme fatale in Emma herself.

Gothic Studies
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The Tyranny of the Cityscape in James Baldwin’s Intimate Cartographies

The skyline of New York projects a dominant presence in the works of James Baldwin—even those set elsewhere. This essay analyzes the socio-spatial relationships and cognitive maps delineated in Baldwin’s writing, and suggests that some of the most compelling and intense portrayals of New York’s psychogeographic landscape vibrate Baldwin’s text. In The Price of the Ticket (1985), Baldwin’s highly personalized accounts of growing up in Harlem and living in New York map the socio-spatial relationships at play in domestic, street, and blended urban spaces, particularly in the title essay, “Dark Days,” and “Here Be Dragons.” Baldwin’s third novel, Another Country (1962), outlines a multistriated vision of New York City; its occupants traverse the cold urban territory and struggle beneath the jagged silhouette of skyscrapers. This essay examines the ways in which Baldwin composes the urban scene in these works through complex image schemas and intricate geometries, the city’s levels, planes, and perspectives directing the movements of its citizens. Further, I argue that Baldwin’s dynamic use of visual rhythms, light, and sound in his depiction of black life in the city, creates a vivid cartography of New York’s psychogeographic terrain. This essay connects Baldwin’s mappings of Harlem to an imbricated visual and sonic conception of urban subjectivity, that is, how the subject is constructed through a simultaneous and synaesthetic visual/scopic and aural/sonic relation to the city, with a focus on the movement of the body through city space.

James Baldwin Review
Unspeakability in Vernon Lee‘s Supernatural Stories

Vernon Lees supernatural fiction provides an interesting test case for speculations about the function of spectrality for women writers on the cusp of the modern era. This article argues that spectrality, in line with Julian Wolfreys’ theories about the ‘hauntological disturbance’ in Victorian Gothic (2002), is both disruptive and desirable, informing the narratives we construct of modernity. It traces the links between the ‘unspeakable’ spectral encounter and contemporary attitudes to gender and sexuality in stories in Vernon Lees collection Hauntings (1890), as well as her Yellow Book story ‘Prince Alberic and the Snake Lady’ (1897). The ghostly encounter is erotic and welcomed as well as fearful, used to comment on the shortcomings of heterosexual marriage and bourgeois life, though this often results in the troubling spectacle of the ravished, mutilated or bloody female corpse. Lees negotiation of unspeakability and the desire for the ghostly is compared to the more graphic depictions of the dead female in stories from E. Nesbits Grim Tales (1893). Representations of the female revenant are considered in relation to the psychoanalytic readings of the otherness of the female corpse put forward by Elisabeth Bronfen (1992).

Gothic Studies
The Sad Demise of Nick Cave

This article considers the music of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds in terms of Gothic aesthetics. The music is Gothic not only in subject matter but also in its very performativity. It is notable for its poly-vocality and multi-genericality. I argue that Gothic music in general is characterised by a conceptual meta-level and demands a certain kind of listening: the auditor must be culturally cognisant, able to spot references to other musics and styles, and to conceive the music in terms of spaces, places and different temporalities. The last section analyses Nick Cave‘s descent into banality after Murder Ballads.

Gothic Studies
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Gothic Studies
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Gothic Studies

each encounter rather than seeking to determine the sexual identity of its participants. We have seen just how complex these motivations could be. Indeed, it is this sense of complexity which defuses the power of the sexual label and questions whether it is meaningful or accurate to classify individuals based purely on their sexual expression. Notes 1 John Brierly, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 28 August 2006. 2 S. Cole, ‘Modernism, male intimacy and the Great War’, English Literary History, 68:2 (2001), p. 469. 3 Jimmy Jacques, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 21

in Queen and country
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gradual decline of overt sexual presentation. Thus, when Jimmy Jacques stated that he ‘acted as you [would] normally’, he was implying that his performance was normal based on his own standards of behaviour and the discretion that had become the norm.88 Like countless other men and women who volunteered or responded to the government’s legal compulsion, Jacques joined the Army to fight for his country. There is little evidence to suggest that an overt display of sexuality would have presented a challenge to that service. Notes 1 Jimmy Jacques, interviewed by Emma

in Queen and country
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David uses Crisp’s quotation as the title for his chapter on post-­war Britain. See David, On Queer Street, p. 152. 6 Transcript of interview with Dennis Campbell, 3bmtv, Conduct Unbecoming (Channel 4 1996), p. 18. 7 Richard Briar, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 9 November 2005. 8 John Booker, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 10 November 2006. 9 Francis Kennedy, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 5 December 2005. 10 Jimmy Jacques, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 21 July 2005. 11 See P. M. Thane, ‘Population politics in post-­war British Culture’, in B. Conekin, F

in Queen and country
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TNA, MEPO 2/8859, Activities of homosexuals, soldiers and civilians: co-­operation between the army and the police (1931–50), notes on a Conference held 7 May 1931, Richmond Terrace, London, re Homosexual Offences, p. 1. 16 Houlbrook, Queer London, p. 68. 17 Jimmy Jacques, interviewed by Emma Vickers, 21 July 2005. 18 Houlbrook, Queer London, p. 83. 19 Patrick Trevor-­ Roper, interviewed by Margo Farnham, 8 January 1990, Hall-­ Carpenter Oral History Project, BLSA, catalogue reference: C456/089 tape, 1. © British Library. 20 Buckle, The Most Upsetting Woman

in Queen and country