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For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

in their spelling and punctuation, including capitalisation and the use of i/j and u/v. The layout of lines and stanzas has been regularised. Annotations on the page are explanatory, being designed to facilitate an informed understanding of the poems. More specialised textual notes are found here at the back of the volume. 317 Women poets of the English Civil War While the texts in this anthology are modernised, we have not abandoned an interest in the poems’ conditions of production and in the contexts in which they originally occurred. Each set of poems is

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Abstract only
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

first in Newtowne (now Cambridge), and later in Ipswich and then North Andover, Massachusetts. Thomas Dudley, whose house at Newtowne reputedly contained a library of eight hundred books, rapidly became the colony’s deputy governor. He served for several years in prominent public positions, including posts as deputy governor and 29 Women poets of the English Civil War governor of the colony. So, too, did Simon Bradstreet, and both men were influential in the establishment of Harvard College. The first of Bradstreet’s eight children was born in Newtowne in 1632, and

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

) chart the sorry fortunes of the royalist cause during the last years of the Civil War, and her emblems articulate a stance of devout fortitude against the conditions of the English republic. Likely to have been composed in the 1650s, these emblems are nominally addressed to her children as didactic or advice pieces. Like 89 Women poets of the English Civil War her occasional and devotional poems, however, the emblems are more broadly addressed to an imagined community of royalist readers. In her poems, Pulter construes Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation

in Women poets of the English Civil War
A world turned upside-down?
John Walter

Chapter 6 . The impact of the English Civil War on society: a world turned upside-down? I F or many contemporaries, the social impact of the 1640s could be captured in the image of the world turned upside-down. The decade began with elections to Parliament in which, it was complained, ‘fellows without shirts, challenge as good a voice as [gentlemen]’. As the decade progressed, Parliament’s destruction of the structures of Charles I’s authoritarian government was paralleled by popular destruction of enclosures and challenges to the authority of the landed

in Crowds and popular politics in early modern England
Ben Dew

C H R O N O L O G Y A N D C O M M E R C E 83 4 The English Civil War and the politics of economic statecraft The relationship between historical writing and the political and religious conflicts of the 1640s was a complex one.1 Historians of the period generally emphasised that their loyalty was to the ‘truth’ rather than to any particular faction or party. Hamon L’Estrange, for example, used the frontispiece to his The Reign of King Charles (1655) to claim that this was a work ‘Faithfully and Impartially delivered’.2 Similarly, in the preface to his

in Commerce, finance and statecraft
Abstract only
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

and Paratext, Manuscript and Print (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013) Hester Pulter Archer, Jayne, ‘A “Perfect Circle”? Alchemy in the Poetry of Hester Pulter’, Literature Compass, 2 (2005), DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-4113.2005.00160.x (accessed 27 April 2017) 21 Women poets of the English Civil War Brady, Andrea, ‘Dying with Honour: Literary Propaganda and the Second English Civil War’, Journal of Military History, 70 (2006): 9–30 Chedgzoy, Kate, Women’s Writing in the British Atlantic World: Memory, Place and History, 1550–1700 (Cambridge: Cambridge

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

‘To Mr Waller upon his Panegyric to the Lord Protector’, her vicious parody of Edmund Waller’s ‘Panegyric to my Lord Protector’. This poem shows the couple’s increasing frustration and disillusionment at what had happened to the godly republic for which they had hoped and worked. This was only intensified at the 249 Women poets of the English Civil War Restoration. Though John Hutchinson was not executed with many other regicides, he was certainly at risk, and it was probably the support of his wife’s family (through both St John and Apsley sides) which saved him

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

by plays, philosophical and fictional letters, and prose fiction in both romance and experimental modes. Cavendish’s first two publications were collections of poetry which also included prefaces explaining her theories of authorship, publication, and poetics. These include some of the period’s most explicit statements 199 Women poets of the English Civil War about the status of women writers, including modest yet defiant assertions of her originality and lack of learning, both of which should perhaps be taken as rhetorical strategies as much as ingenuous

in Women poets of the English Civil War