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Alan Thacker

The Venerable Bede has often been held as creator of a single collective identity for the Germanic inhabitants of Britain: the English (gens Anglorum). This article examines how Bede crafted his notion of Englishness, reviewing his use of terms for nation, race and peoples to exclude those of whom he did not approve. It included the Northumbrians and the people of Kent whom Bede regarded as the progenitors of the English Church. It excluded the Mercians who were rivals and sometime enemies of Bede‘s own people, the Northumbrians. By the time Bede finished his account (731) the term gens Anglorum had begun to lose its usefulness in binding together the Northumbrians and Kentishmen as custodians of a unitary Church. After Bede terminology remained unstable, writers such as Boniface or Alcuin being as likely to call the people of England Saxons as Angles/English. Bedes role as the father of Englishness is thus here nuanced and seen to be historically contingent.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author:

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

of the English Review, author of The Good Soldier and transformer of Ezra Pound’s verse, he performed a vital part. Indeed, Max Saunders writes in his magisterial biography of Ford that ‘the period of literary modernism is “the Ford era” as much as it is Pound’s, or T. S. Eliot’s, or Joyce’s’; Ford was ‘at the centre of the three most innovative groups of writers this century’.4 In addition, the language of decline, collapse and fragmentation is commonly applied by historical analysts to events and developments of the early twentieth century. These were the years

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

modernism, of multiple truths; the primacy of change. The relationship between Ford and Lawrence at times was close, and at times was difficult. It began when Ford first published Lawrence in the English Review and ‘introduced him to literary London’.3 Later Ford remembered reading ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’ and discovering ‘another genius’, and, though he didn’t want to publish The White Peacock (Lawrence’s first novel) in the Review, he sent it with a recommendation to Heinemann, who published it in 1911.4 Here, Lawrence’s thoughts are a useful way into Ford, his prose

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author:

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Abstract only
Mark Pitchford

Conservative Party were deliberate and open. Its members acted as stewards at Conservative Party meetings, and rented rooms from Conservative local associations. Conservative MPs made no secret of their sympathies for extreme-right regimes, while others betrayed their views by supporting restrictive measures on ‘aliens’ seeking sanctuary from them. Support for extremeright views appeared in Conservative publications such as the English Review, Saturday Review, the National Review, and Truth. The Conservative Party was associated with Truth via its connection with Neville

in The Conservative Party and the extreme right 1945–75
Conservative responses to nationalisation and Poplarism, 1900–40
Liam Ryan

communism in a 1928 article in the English Review , the Conservative politician John Gretton stated that nationalisation, alongside the ‘prodigality of the social services’, was anathema to the principles of liberty and freedom, ‘eating economically into the vitals of the community and leading ultimately to waste and corruption’. 25 While ideological hostility to public ownership remained

in The many lives of corruption
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

, Conclusion 227 this interruption was seen as the herald of positive change, and this was to be celebrated rather than condemned. In September 1914, the English Review trumpeted that ‘This war will be the great clearing house of civilisation.’11 Despite the Manchester Guardian’s warning to all those who had talked of the coming of war as ‘a moral purge’ or ‘a tonic’, Edmund Gosse, in an article entitled ‘War and Literature’, described the conflict as, ‘the sovereign disinfectant . . . the Condy’s Fluid that cleans out the stagnant pools and clotted channels of the

in A war of individuals
Hugh Cunningham

benevolence’. ‘A spirit of philanthropy and benevolence characterizes the present age’, wrote Philanthropos in the Monthly Ledger in 1774. In a critical review of G. Gregory’s Essays Historical and Moral in the English Review in 1785, the writer conceded that Gregory’s ‘heart swells with an extensive philanthropy and benevolence’. 12 Philanthropy, as some of the above examples show, was frequently seen as a characteristic of authors and their works. A review of Sterne’s sermons was pleased to find in them ‘so large a share of philanthropy’. Adam Ferguson’s Essay on

in The reputation of philanthropy since 1750
Abstract only
S.C. Aveyard

: Northern Ireland 1972–75 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), p. 185.   9  Richard English, ‘Review: Shaun McDaid, Template for peace’, Irish Historical Studies, 39:154 (2014), p. 366. 10  Michael Cunningham, British government policy in Northern Ireland 1969– 2000 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001). 11  Paul Bew and Henry Patterson, The British state and the Ulster crisis: from Wilson to Thatcher (London: Verso, 1985). 12  Paul Arthur, Special relationships: Britain, Ireland and the Northern Ireland problem (Belfast: Blackstaff, 2000); Peter

in No solution