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Cultural identity and change in the Atlantic archipelago

The concept of 'margins' denotes geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. This book aims to question the term 'marginal' itself, to hear the voices talking 'across' borders and not only to or through an English centre. The first part of the book examines debates on the political and poetic choice of language, drawing attention to significant differences between the Irish and Scottish strategies. It includes a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers. The book also explores masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorizing. A different perspective on the notion of marginality is offered by addressing 'Englishness' in relation to 'migrant' writing in prose concerned with India and England after Independence. The second part of the book focuses on a wide range of new poetry to question simplified margin/centre relations. It discusses a historicising perspective on the work of cultural studies and its responses to the relationship between ethnicity and second-generation Irish musicians from Sean Campbell. The comparison of contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction which identifies similarities and differences in recent developments is also considered. In each instance the writers take on the task of examining and assessing points of connection and diversity across a particular body of work, while moving away from contrasts which focus on an English 'norm'.

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Disorder and stability in the United Kingdom
Author:

1820 is about much more than a single year. Integrating in detail the experiences of both Britain and Ireland, this book provides a compelling narrative and analysis of the United Kingdom in a year of European revolution. The year 1820 was a year of political dislocation unparalleled in peace time, but the gravity of the situation has been obscured for four main reasons. First, the dominant historical narrative of the United Kingdom in the early nineteenth century has remained so English-centred that Ireland only begins to intrude upon it in the mid-1840s, and Scotland scarcely at all. Second, Peterloo has over-determined the interpretation of the period. The third reason why events that year are misinterpreted or ignored is that the Government itself actively sought to efface the challenges confronting it. To do otherwise would have jeopardised its survival in a year that combined a general election, a constitutional crisis, a seemingly irreparable rift with the monarch, and a surge of radicalism both within and beyond Parliament. The fourth reason why the true significance of events in 1820 has been obscured derives from the late-twentieth century's preoccupation with the Queen Caroline affair. From the early 1980s, increasingly gender-aware scholarship made the second half of 1820 one of the most intensively investigated six months in modern British history.

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Malcolm Chase

context. The year 1820 was also a year of political dislocation unparalleled in peace time, but the gravity of the situation has been obscured for four main reasons. First, the dominant historical narrative of the United Kingdom in the early nineteenth century has remained so English-centred that Ireland only begins to intrude upon it in the mid-1840s, and Scotland scarcely at all; but the nature of the challenge confronting the UK Government in 1820 cannot be comprehended from such a perspective. (Wales is similarly marginalised, however it barely troubled the

in 1820
Abstract only
Jane M. Adams

on intensive therapeutic regimes characteristic of mid-century practice had declined to be replaced by more leisurely routines by the last decades of the nineteenth century.38 The evidence for the English centres is assessed to see if a similar trend is apparent or whether renewed interest in hydrotherapeutics along with the introduction of treatments first developed at European spas meant that investors continued to provide specialist facilities for patients from the 1880s. The chapter goes on to assess the social and medical functions of the growing number of

in Healing with water
Domestic recipe collections in early modern Wales
Alun Withey

, early modern Wales had no cities and few large towns of more than 2,000 inhabitants. Nevertheless, many Welsh market towns, and even those located well within the hinterlands, maintained strong links with English centres and were important urban environments for surrounding rural areas. Perhaps the most significant characteristic of Wales was its language, accompanied by a strong

in Reading and writing recipe books, 1550–1800
Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

productively in this context (see, for example, Stringer 1992).) Instead, what I want to draw attention to is the fact that this Irish dimension has rarely even been acknowledged in scholarly discussions of these musicians and that, in its absence, this work has assuredly posited second-generation Irish musicians as a kind of ‘white Englishcentre with which to differentiate more ostensibly marginal immigrant-descended cultural practitioners. In doing so, this work has not only assumed that the children of Irish Catholic labour migrants are straightforwardly and

in Across the margins
Contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction
Glenda Norquay
and
Gerry Smyth

that ‘[the] relationship of the Celtic diaspora to the English mainstream still remains to be properly investigated’ while the ‘difficulty’ of such an enterprise is explained as due to the complex history of political and linguistic development (1993: 62). Such (un)critical endorsement of ideological space (English centre, Celtic periphery) contributes to the process whereby that hegemonic space is reproduced and perpetuated. This chapter aspires to an alternative critical project: an analysis of contemporary Scottish and Irish fiction through a comparison of the

in Across the margins
Lindsay O’Neill

Effects are seized in Constantinople’. The newsletter also references letters from Vienna and ‘the Italian letters’.63 Thus news started in a certain locality, be it Candia or Hamburg or Constantinople, and made its way through the European centres of news: ports like Marseilles or government centres like Paris and Vienna, before arriving in the English centre of London or, if we want to be more specific, the English centre named Henry Muddiman. The form through which news flowed varied; it could travel orally, or by letter or by gazette, and mentioning the form could

in Connecting centre and locality
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay
and
Gerry Smyth

concept of ‘margins’ denotes therefore geographical, economic, demographic, cultural and political positioning in relation to a perceived centre. One aim of this book, however, is to move away from rather than replicate this core/periphery model – to question the term ‘marginal’ itself, to hear voices talking ‘across’ borders and not only to or through an English centre. Even as a reclaimed term, the idea of ‘marginality’ still appears to give some priority to a notional centre; while this has some bearing on historical and geographical structures of power, it can also

in Across the margins
Ann Buckley

any case it would have served well as an anthology of musical and poetic forms already familiar to an Anglo-Saxon community of the eleventh century, even if the specifically German songs (particularly those in praise of local secular and ecclesiastical rulers) might not have had an immediate resonance with performing musicians in Canterbury. We may wonder what might have resulted there or indeed at another English centre of learning had the Norman Conquest not taken place, or not taken place when it did. In a short few years some of the

in Aspects of knowledge