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Daisy Connon

Towards a Theory for African Cinema is an English translation of a talk given in French by the Tunisian filmmaker and critic Férid Boughedir (1944–) at a conference on international cinema, which took place in Montreal in 1974. In his presentation Boughedir discusses the vocation of the African filmmaker, who must avoid succumbing to the escapism and entertainment values of Western cinema and instead strive to reflect the contradictions and tensions of the colonised African identity, while promoting a revitalisation of African culture. Drawing on the example of the 1968 film Mandabi (The Money Order) by the Senegalese director Sembène Ousmane, Boughedir conceptualises a form of cinema which resists the influences of both Hollywood and auteur film and awakens viewers, instead of putting them to sleep. Boughedir‘s source text is preceded by a translator‘s introduction, which situates his talk within contemporary film studies.

Film Studies
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David Murphy and Patrick Williams

several years, returning to Tunisia in 1972, since when she has collaborated on many Tunisian films, including ones from the ‘Cinema Jedid’ (New Cinema) movement: Fatma 75 (Selma Baccar), Traversées (Mahmoud ben Mahmoud, 1984), Les Baliseurs du désert (Nacer Khemir, 1986), La Trace (Nejia ben Mabrouk, 1988) and Halfaouine (Ferid Boughedir, 1990), as well as working with directors from across the Arab world such as

in Postcolonial African cinema
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From lost sites to reclaimed images
Guy Austin

Paloma , there is another connection at work – a nexus of symbolism that links the Mediterranean, notions of maternity and Arab identity. The Tunisian film-maker Ferid Boughedir has noted that in Arabic the word for mother, Oum , is very close to the word for nation, Oumma . He concludes that ‘pour les Arabes, totalement méditerranéens en cela, la mère signifie toujours CE QU’IL Y A DE PLUS IMPORTANT’ [for Arabs, who are to

in Algerian national cinema
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David Murphy and Patrick Williams

, ultimately, its comic, exaggerated vision creates a fictional world in which all sorts of transgressions are permitted, even if only temporarily. In this context, it is highly significant that Saturday falls for a man who is really a woman on the inside. As a woman, Myguy eventually disregards the advice of his male friends and offers Saturday the love and respect that she desires. Ferid Boughedir’s claim that the film conveys a

in Postcolonial African cinema
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David Murphy and Patrick Williams

justifies treating African cinema as a movement’ (Taylor 2000 : 139). More importantly, filmmakers including Med Hondo, Haile Gerima and Ferid Boughedir have strongly criticised Return to the Source films for peddling precisely the kind of timeless, exoticised, ‘authentic’ Africa that appeals to Western audiences and avoids the contemporary realities of the continent, though Boughedir does at least

in Postcolonial African cinema