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Editor: Glennis Byron

The late twentieth century saw growing number of articles and books appearing on new national gothic; however, the wider context for this had not really been addressed. This collection of essays explores an emerging globalgothic useful for all students and academics interested in the gothic, in international literature, cinema, and cyberspace, presenting examples of globalgothic in the 21st-century forms. It analyses a global dance practice first performed in Japan, Ankoku butoh, and surveys the ways in which Indigenous cultures have been appropriated for gothic screen fictions. To do this, it looks at the New Zealand television series on Maori mythologies, Mataku. The unlocated 'vagabonds' of Michel Faber's "The Fahrenheit Twins" are doubles (twins) of a gothic trajectory as well as globalgothic figures of environmental change. The book considers the degree to which the online vampire communities reveal cultural homogenisation and the imposition of Western forms. Global culture has created a signature phantasmagoric spatial experience which is uncanny. Funny Games U.S. (2008) reproduces this process on the material level of production, distribution and reception. The difference between the supposedly 'primitive' local associated with China and a progressive global city associated with Hong Kong is brought out through an analysis of cannibal culture. In contemporary Thai horror films, the figure of horror produced is neither local nor global but simultaneously both. The book also traces the development, rise and decline of American gothic, and looks at one of the central gothic figures of the twenty-first century: the zombie.

Michel Faber’s ‘The Fahrenheit Twins’
Sue Zlosnik

technology accompanying global capitalism has effected the annihilation of space by time rather than vice versa. Indeed this effect is seen to be one of the key features of the modern global condition. In the words of Paul Virilio, we are ‘not seeing an “end of history”, but … an end of geography’ ( 2000b : 9). Michel Faber’s ‘The Fahrenheit Twins’ is the title story in a collection of weird tales published in

in Globalgothic
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Glennis Byron

globalgothic texts are linked to the fluidity of a space-time continuum whereby vast spaces are not always separated by distance or dislocation. Drawing on a history of gothic depictions of the Arctic (Shelley, Coleridge, Poe), Sue Zlosnik’s reading of Michel Faber’s ‘Fahrenheit Twins’ examines a text that is set, quite literally, on top of the globe. Here the uncanny cartography of the now charted Arctic

in Globalgothic