, childcare, education and health grew, it is not surprising that amateurs focused on such accessible subject matter. 16 Carefree play and idealised family life offered reassurance and affirmed a family’s sense of identity, at least to the filmmaker. Films also expressed family experiences that were beginning to be qualitatively different in many homes from either wartime years or the 1930s, once rationing

in Amateur film
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A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82

Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the Family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality, and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology, devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse.

Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the Family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the ‘Faith of Our Fathers’ before and after Vatican II.

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Meaning and practice, 1927–77

Amateur film: Meaning and practice 1927–77 traces the development of non-professional interests in making and showing film. It explores how amateur cinematography gained a following among the wealthy, following the launch of lightweight portable cine equipment by Kodak and Pathé in Britain during the early 1920s. As social access to the new hobby widened, enthusiasts began to use cine equipment at home, work, on holiday and elsewhere. Some amateurs made films only for themselves while others became cine club members, contributors to the hobby literature and participated in film competitions from local to international level.

The stories of individual filmmakers, clubs and the emergence of an independent hobby press, as well as the non-fiction films made by groups and individuals, provide a unique lens through which contemporary responses to daily experience may be understood over fifty years of profound social, cultural and economic change. Using regional film archive collections, oral testimony and textual sources, this book explores aspects of family life, working experience, locality and social issues, leisure time and overseas travel as captured by filmmakers from northern and northwest England. This study of visual memory, identity and status sets cine camera use within a wider trajectory of personal record making, and discusses the implications of footage moving from private to public spaces as digitisation widens access and transforms contemporary archive practice.

Re-visioning family change

2 Beyond the modern family: re-visioning family change In Chapter 1 we traced the development of the idea of the ‘modern family’ from its origins in nineteenth-century evolutionary thought to the structural-functionalist perspectives that dominated thinking about family change through the first half of the twentieth century. We saw how this way of thinking about families began to be challenged from the 1960s onwards: first, as a result of empirical scholarship that challenged key assumptions about the contours of family life in the present and in the past

in Family rhythms
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Irish families in the sociological imagination

in the challenges families faced across the generations. This book aims to document and explain the changing rhythms, textures and meanings of Irish family life from a sociological perspective through an innovative qualitative longitudinal approach, drawing on two major datasets newly available through the Irish Qualitative Data Archive (www.iqda.ie): Life Histories and Social Change and Growing Up in Ireland. See Panel i.1 below for a detailed description of the datasets and how they are used throughout the book. These datasets are described as qualitative because

in Family rhythms
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Resilient families

from the LHSC study and interviews with children and their parents who participated in the GUI study. Drawing on these qualitative longitudinal resources, our book has presented a rich account of continuity and change in the textures, meanings and rhythms of family life in the Republic of Ireland since the early years of the state. We have also consciously highlighted the value of revisiting past, sometimes almost forgotten, social science studies for helping us to understand the complex pathways of family change. Our qualitative longitudinal focus is consistent with

in Family rhythms
Army wives and domesticating the ‘native’

attempt to form Muslim women in a particular mould. During the last two decades there has been much research on the process of ‘domesticating the empire’, the methods by which British, Dutch, Portuguese and French imperial regimes attempted to intervene in, regulate or remake indigenous family life in its own image.1 This chapter aims, in part, to investigate the overt and implicit meanings of the model of family life, companionate marriage and gender roles that underpinned the emancipation campaign. The paternalistic origins of domesticity are complex and varied from

in Burning the veil
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seen, the communal apartment in the Stalin era and the communal apartment block in the Khrushchev era were both presented as heterogeneous socialist communities. In this story, the apartment exchange chain seemed to serve a similar function. Living with adult offspring One of the major types of apartment exchange was to replace a relatively large apartment for two small ones so that adult offspring could enjoy a private family life. One Rabotnitsa article claimed that, according to sociological data, around 50 per cent of young people actually preferred to go on

in Gender and housing in Soviet Russia

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 65 7 The Irish family – different or not? Tony Fahey William Carleton gained a reputation as a literary figure in the 1830s for his Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, a series of whimsical but informative sketches of Irish rural folk life of his day. Much of what he wrote had to do with family life, but nothing told as much of the family patterns of his times as his own origins. He grew up the son of a Catholic tenant farmer in Co. Tyrone who, as an entry in the Encyclopaedia

in Are the Irish different?
The negotiation of belonging and family life

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 132 7 African migrants in Ireland: the negotiation of belonging and family life Liam Coakley Introduction The migration flows that transformed Ireland from a country of emigrants to an attractive site of immigration between 1997 and 2007 have recently been reversed. As a consequence, Ireland is again best seen as a peripheral emigrant nursery in the globalized world economy, with Irish population patterns once again moulded more significantly by the outflow of Irish-born people than by any equivalent inflow of

in Migrations