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Euro-American orphans, the bildungsroman, and kinship building
Maria Holmgren Troy
,
Elizabeth Kella
, and
Helena Wahlström

4 Family matters: Euro-American orphans, the bildungsroman, and kinship building Implicit in a phrase like ‘loved ones’ is an open-ended notion of kinship that respects the principles of choice and self-determination in defining kin, with love spanning the ideologically contrasting domains of biological family and families we create. (Weston, 1997: 183) As we have seen in Chapter 3, contemporary orphan tales typically foreground alternative, or non-normative, families. In this chapter we focus on John Irving’s The Cider House Rules (1985), and Kaye Gibbons

in Making home
Questioning gender roles
Brigitte Rollet

characteristics of a science-fiction film. It could be seen as a piece of pro-life propaganda and a heavy vehicle for family values. However, the ideological reappropriation of family matters by right-wing and far-right political movements does not necessarily imply that family is in itself a ‘right-wing’ or conservative issue. One way of understanding these apparent contradictions would be to consider the specificity of France and French feminists with regard to motherhood. Indeed, motherhood has always been a tricky issue for feminists

in Coline Serreau
Open Access (free)
Author:

Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.

Open Access (free)
Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

Family Matters 125 5 Running repairs: corruption, community and duty in Family Matters it is their characters, indeed, that make people what they are, but it is by reason of their actions that they are happy or the reverse. (Aristotle, Poetics, Book 6) O The world as evil let us not resign, But be good whilst to good we still incline. Nor good nor bad forever will remain; Let us in memory the good retain. (The Shah-Namah of Fardusi, trans. Alexander Rogers, p. 60) N 6 December 1992, the Babri Mosque at Ayodhya was destroyed by a large crowd of Hindu

in Rohinton Mistry
Abstract only
Avril Horner

In 1982 Barbara is 74. Diana dies in February. Family matters take up much of Barbara’s time. She feels unsettled by having to move back to 64 The Green in June although, once there, she is happy and decides to begin a new novel (which will become The Juniper Tree). Moonlighter Productions buy the film rights for The Vet’s Daughter but fail to raise enough money to make the film. The Virago reprint of Our Spoons is released in 1983 to good reviews. Barbara finishes The Juniper Tree in 1984 and sends it to her agent but it is rejected by several publishers. She is worried about family: her granddaughter Nuria is pregnant but her partner has no job; her sister Nan is seriously ill; and Chloe’s husband has become aggressive. However, she enjoys being with three-year-old Lucy, Julian and Sally’s daughter. She is greatly cheered when Methuen offer to publish The Juniper Tree but this is overshadowed by Nan’s death and by Richard’s increasing frailty. Richard is hospitalized at the end of December 1984 and dies in January. Barbara ‘sees’ him several times after his death and misses him badly. The Virago reprints find a new audience for her work and many fans contact her. The Juniper Tree receives excellent reviews and she is interviewed several times. She keeps in touch with her remaining siblings, realizing that all of them have a limited time left.

in Barbara Comyns
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author:

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

The Manchester School, colonial and postcolonial transformations
Author:

Anthropology after Gluckman places the intimate circle around Max Gluckman, his Manchester School, in the vanguard of modern social anthropology. The book discloses the School’s intense, argument-rich collaborations, developing beyond an original focus in south and central Africa. Where outsiders have seen dominating leadership by Gluckman, a common stock of problems, and much about conflict, Richard Werbner highlights how insiders were drawn to explore many new frontiers in fieldwork and in-depth, reflexive ethnography, because they themselves, in class and gender, ethnicity and national origins, were remarkably inclusive. Characteristically different anthropologists, their careers met the challenges of being a public intellectual, an international celebrity, an institutional good citizen, a social and political activist, an advocate of legal justice. Their living legacies are shown, for the first time, through interlinked social biography and intellectual history to reach broadly across politics, law, ritual, semiotics, development studies, comparative urbanism, social network analysis and mathematical sociology. Innovation – in research methods and techniques, in documenting people’s changing praxis and social relations, in comparative analysis and a destabilizing strategy of re-analysis within ethnography – became the School’s hallmark. Much of this exploration confronted troubling times in Africa, colonial and postcolonial, which put the anthropologists and their anthropological knowledge at risk. The resurgence of debate about decolonization makes the accounts of fierce, End of Empire argument and recent postcolonial anthropology all the more topical. The lessons, even in activism, for social scientists, teachers as well as graduate and undergraduate students are compelling for our own troubled times.

International man of stories
Peter Morey

:16 pm 172 Rohinton Mistry of that documentary realism sometimes seen as symptomatic of the author’s writing. It also uses a variety of literary tropes and discourses as it weaves its narrative fabric, creating a quilt which sustains and supports both characters and readers as they experience the giddy fluctuations of a menacing, topsy-turvy world. Even in the ostensibly more traditional Family Matters, similar issues of corruption versus integrity are explored. Here, notions of the multiple and sometimes conflicting demands of duty are set alongside filial loyalty

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

believable interior life.’22 Other legitimate criticisms include the charge of a tendency to sentimentality. In a review of Family Matters, Adam MarsJones comments that the novel ‘moves to a close on a surge of pious sentiment’, and accuses Mistry of differentiating between the ‘significant’ and ‘arbitrary’ fates of his characters according to whether or not they are Parsis: a charge which is perhaps a little harsh yet understandable in a text with a more intrinsic focus than the previous, expansive tour de force.23 It is certainly the case that the fountain of domestic

in Rohinton Mistry
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Family and hospitality in Al-Karak ( Jordan)
Christine Jungen

from time to time to give greater weight to his words, he asks everyone’s news, tells jokes and comments on current family matters. The gathering hangs on his every word, with laughter and exclamations accompanying the conclusion to each anecdote. Most of them – apart perhaps from the very youngest – already know most of Abu Nadil’s stories. But they still appreciate the way he tells them, the comical

in Arab youths