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The avant-garde and its Legacy

In 1909, the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Founding Manifesto of Futurism was published on the front page of Le Figaro. Between 1909 and 1912, the Futurists published works celebrating speed and danger, glorifying war and technology, and advocating political and artistic revolution. In Europe, this avant-garde movement was active in the field of painting and sculpture, theatre, photography and politics. This book reassesses the activities and legacies of Futurism. It looks at Futurist manifestos by linking techniques of promotion with practices in commercial advertising, and exploring the question of how Futurist manifestos address notions of genius and gender. The book also reconstructs the historical, cultural and ideological background of Marinetti's Manifesto del tattilismo. Zurich Dadaists adopted cultural stances heavily indebted to the terms of critical engagement and cultural visibility initiated within the Futurist circle. The book analyses avant-garde's examination of its internal strategies of identity and canonization, and the importance of Futurism for the Pierre Albert-Birot. It charts the details of the argument on simultaneity between Umberto Boccioni and Robert Delaunay, and analyses the critical readings of Fernand Léger's La noce. The dialogue between Occultism and Futurism is explored by discussing the theme of night in the works of the Florentine Futurists. In La cucina futurista, food is separated from its nutritional function, and the act of eating is related to notions of creativity and identity. The book presents unique examples of innovative expressivity in Italian Futurists' free-word poems, and examines poetry celebrating the triumph of modern aviation.

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Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi

Introduction Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi Introduction In 1909 the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s Founding Manifesto of Futurism was published on the front page of Le Figaro. Between 1909 and 1912 the Futurists published over thirty manifestos, celebrating speed and danger, glorifying war and technology, and advocating political and artistic revolution. In Italy, France, England and Russia, this avant-garde movement was active in the field of painting and sculpture, theatre, photography and politics. After

in Back to the Futurists
Marinetti and technological war
Marja Härmänmaa

recognised by Baldissone and Blum. See Baldissone 1986: 137; Blum 1996: 100–2. 13 Farfa, Messaggio di Farfa a Marinetti per le direttive di Venezia 1944: an unpublished manuscript conserved in the Beinecke library, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti papers, box 17, folder 1068. 14 The original letter is in the Beinecke library, Filippo Tommaso papers, box 10, folder 476. Now also in Härmänmaa 2000: 214. References Agnese, G. (1990). Marinetti. Una vita esplosiva (Milan: Camunia). Armstrong, T. (1998). Modernism, Technology and the Body. A Cultural Study (Cambridge: Cambridge

in Back to the Futurists
Futurist cinema as metamedium
Carolina Fernández Castrillo

with the dynamism of the imaginary dominated the aesthetics of the works of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. Above all, he tried to combat the uncertainty that was afflicting his contemporaries through the use of provocative techniques. His irrepressible yearning to channel the latent energy of society led to the foundation of the first avant-garde movement. It was the first example of a systematic set of principles in the cultural sphere designed to rescue a new society in crisis. In this chapter, I will try to show how the works of Marinetti, Arnaldo Ginna and Bruno

in Back to the Futurists
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The original Futurist cookbook?
Selena Daly

12 Le Roi Bombance: the original Futurist cookbook? Selena Daly Selena Daly Le Roi Bombance The themes of nutrition and digestion fascinated Filippo Tommaso Marinetti for much of his career. The beginnings of this interest can be traced to his pre-Futurist play Le Roi Bombance, published in 1905, in which the eponymous obese king is concerned only with satisfying his enormous appetite. Marinetti’s most famous discussion of gastronomy and gastronomic habits came in 1932 with the publication of La cucina futurista, which was a development of the Manifesto della

in Back to the Futurists
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Language and politics in Gramsci and Marinetti
Sascha Bru

15 The Untameables: language and politics in Gramsci and Marinetti Sascha Bru Sascha Bru The Untameables Gli indomabili [The Untameables] is one of the most intriguing allegorical narratives Filippo Tommaso Marinetti wrote. The romanzo’s tale is quickly retold. In a pit situated on a desert-like island a group of men coming from elite backgrounds have exiled themselves to live in a bestial state of carnage and bloodshed. These ferocious indomitables suffer from short-term memory loss, not knowing what it is they go through every night. Each night they are led

in Back to the Futurists
Filippo Tommaso Marinetti
Katia Pizzi

Italian futurism and the machine 48 2 Mechanical mach(in)ismo: Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Under the skin, the body is an overheated factory. (A. Artaud, ‘Van Gogh, the man suicided by society’, 1947) 2.1  Constructing the futurist machine Filippo Tommaso Emilio Angelo Carlo Marinetti (1876–1944) was the founder, sponsor and primum mobile of futurismo. Futurism was his creature: intellectually, structurally and financially. Marinetti was an indefatigable traveller and the product of a modern cosmopolitan upbringing. A hypnotic and effusive orator, deftly seizing

in Italian futurism and the machine
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The Futurist manifesto as avant-garde advertisement
Matthew McLendon

of publishing’ (Gambillo and Fiori 1958: 239). Boccioni’s anxiety and his insistence that ‘Marinetti should be here’ demonstrates the Futurists’ consciousness of the importance of publicity to their movement. Marinetti was the one with the ‘name’, and it was he who had the ‘experience of publishing’. Without Marinetti the Futurist publicity machine – of which the manifesto was the primary component – obviously did not run smoothly. Filippo Tommaso Marinetti was undoubtedly the primary momentum behind Futurism, though some may argue that his tight-fisted control

in Back to the Futurists
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F. T. Marinetti’s Il tattilismo and the Futurist critique of separation
Pierpaolo Antonello

3 ‘Out of touch’: F. T. Marinetti’s Il tattilismo and the Futurist critique of separation Pierpaolo Antonello Pierpaolo Antonello ‘Out of touch’ On the evening of 11 January 1921, at the Théâtre de l’Œuvre in Paris, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, the founding father of Futurism, presented what he claimed to be a new form of art: Tactilism, or the Art of Touch. He read aloud Il tattilismo. Manifesto futurista that he had allegedly conceived the summer before while bathing in Antignano, on the Tuscan coast near Livorno, and that he had penned for the occasion. He

in Back to the Futurists
New challenges to reading
John J. White

13 The cult of the ‘expressive’ in Italian Futurist poetry: new challenges to reading John J. White John J. White The cult of the ‘expressive’ Three years after publishing his Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism in 1909, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti began to set out his proposals for making Futurist poetry more ‘expressive’. Accompanied by the caveat that his recommendations were ‘neither categorical nor systematic’ (Marinetti 2006: 124),1 Marinetti’s Technical Manifesto of Futurist Literature offered a series of practical guidelines in what was to become the

in Back to the Futurists