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Momma Don’t Allow (1956), We Are the Lambeth Boys (1959) and March to Aldermaston (1959)
Colin Gardner

. (First Free Cinema Manifesto) 1 The moment you reject the factor of interpretation you are actually rejecting your responsibility. (Karel Reisz) 2 A socialism that cannot express itself in emotional, human, poetic terms is one that will never capture the imagination of the people – who are poets even if they don’t know it. (Lindsay Anderson) 3

in Karel Reisz
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In a long and varied career, Lindsay Anderson made training films, documentaries, searing family dramas and blistering satires, including This Sporting Life, O Lucky Man! and Britannia Hospital. This book is about a director whose work came to public attention with Free Cinema but who, unlike many of his peers in that movement did not take the Hollywood route to success. What emerges is a strong feeling for the character of the man as well as for a remarkable career in British cinema. Making use of hitherto unseen original materials from Anderson's extensive personal and professional records, this book is valuable as a study of how the films came about: the production problems involved, the collaborative input of others, as well as the completed films' promotion and reception. It also offers a finely argued take on the whole issue of film authorship. It prompts renewed respect for the man and the artist and a desire to watch the films all over again.

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Author: Neil Sinyard

This book explores why Jack Clayton had made so few films and why most of them failed to find a large audience. It examines the kind of criticism they generated, sometimes adulatory but sometimes dismissive and even condescending. The book hopes to throw light on certain tendencies and developments within the film industry and of film criticism, the British film industry and film criticism in particular. The fact that Clayton's films fit David Bordwell's paradigm of the art film is one explanation why producers had difficulty with him and why mainstream cinema found his work hard to place and assimilate. Clayton's pictorial eye has sometimes antagonised critics: they often take exception to some aspect of his mise-en-scene. Clayton had come to prominence with Room at the Top, around the time of the British 'Free Cinema' movement and immediately prior to the so-called British 'new-wave' films of the early 1960s from directors such as Tony Richardson and John Schlesinger. Thorold Dickinson's evocation of the Russian atmosphere and, in particular, his use of suspenseful soundtrack to suggest ghostly visitation undoubtedly had an influence on Jack Clayton's style in both The Bespoke Overcoat and The Innocents. The critical controversy concerning the status of Jack Clayton as director and artist is probably at its most intense over The Pumpkin Eater. Clayton stressed the importance of an opening that established right away the situation of 'a woman in crisis' but wanted to delay the Harrods scene so as to build up an atmosphere of suspense.

Sight and Sound in the 1950s
John Gibbs

Autumn 1956 issue of Sight and Sound, enabling consideration of the broader cultural changes associated with the social and political events of that year, and of developments in the careers of some of the key contributors: the first Free Cinema programme, Gavin Lambert’s departure for Hollywood and Penelope Houston’s accession to the editorship. Joining the establishment Upon arrival at Sight and Sound, at the end of 1949, Lambert had to negotiate his way in relation to existing structures. For instance, Sequence had taken, and continued to take, a sceptical view of

in The life of mise-en-scène
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960)
Colin Gardner

resignation and defiance. Suddenly, his mood lightens: ‘Come on duck, let’s get down’. He pulls her up and together they walk away from the camera towards the city below. As we noted at the end of the last chapter, the so-called ‘British New Wave’, of which Reisz’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning is exemplary, emerged less out of the documentary roots of Free Cinema than in response to the burgeoning world of proletarian drama

in Karel Reisz
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Colin Gardner

1 Percy struts his stuff beside the Alford House Youth Club cricket nets in Free Cinema’s We Are the Lambeth Boys , the second in the Ford Motor Company’s ‘Look at Britain Series’ 2 The Lambeth girls engage in some friendly banter with the lads at the

in Karel Reisz
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John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan, and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

rights to the music and copyright payments would have been too costly. In addition he had recorded without permission the Managing Director of Dreamland (the showman calling customers to view ‘Torture through the Ages’. This profoundly offended that individual, who wrote to the British Film Institute (responsible for the Free Cinema programme at which it was first screened) and refused to allow it to be shown further. 65 Although

in Lindsay Anderson
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Keith Beattie

for the cinema and television. The efflorescence of documentary filmmaking in Britain during the later part of the 1950s known as Free Cinema was, as many of its practitioners have commented, indebted to Jennings’ work. Karel Reisz, whose films, together with those of Lindsay Anderson, were central to Free Cinema, stated that Jennings’ films bequeathed the ‘notion that you could make films out of observation rather than [a] pre-thought reconstruc­ tion of ideas’.13 Certain scenes in Free Cinema films apply this notion Beattie_01_Chps.indd 134 06/10/2009 15

in Humphrey Jennings
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan, and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

sequence began when, out of the blue, Tony Richardson (his Free Cinema co-worker who was also one of the Royal Court’s management committee) sent him The Waiting of Lester Abbs by Kathleen Sully, a writer whom Anderson admired. Anderson directed it in June 1957 without sets or costumes as a Sunday night production. It went sufficiently well that he was invited to direct Willis Hall’s The Long and the Short and the Tall (1959

in Lindsay Anderson

Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain explores the relationship between classic American films about juvenile delinquency and British popular youth culture in the mid-twentieth century. The book examines the censorship, publicity and fandom surrounding such Hollywood films as The Wild One, Blackboard Jungle, Rebel Without a Cause, Rock Around the Clock and Jailhouse Rock alongside such British films as The Blue Lamp, Spare the Rod and Serious Charge. Intersecting with star studies and social and cultural history, this is the first book to re-vision the stardom surrounding three extraordinarily influential Hollywood stars: Marlon Brando, James Dean and Elvis Presley. By looking specifically at the meanings of these American stars to British fans, this analysis provides a logical and sustained narrative that explains how and why these Hollywood images fed into, and disrupted, British cultural life. Screening the Hollywood Rebels in 1950s Britain is based upon a wide range of sources including censorship records, both mainstream and trade newspapers and periodicals, archival accounts and memoirs, as well as the films themselves. The book is a timely intervention of film culture and focuses on key questions about screen violence and censorship, masculinity and transnational stardom, method acting and performance, Americanisation and popular post-war British culture. The book is essential reading for researchers, academics and students of film and social and cultural history, alongside general readers interested in the links between the media and popular youth culture in the 1950s.