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Felix M. Larkin

13 Arthur Griffith and the Freeman’s Journal Felix M. Larkin1 Arthur Griffith is a forgotten man of Irish history, but one who deserves to be remembered as much for his journalism as for the part he played in the foundation of the modern Irish state.2 He was a brilliant polemicist, and his ideas shaped the final phase of Ireland’s struggle for independence and the early politics of the new state. Griffith was born in Dublin in 1871, and trained as a printer. Active in advanced nationalist circles from an early age, he first came to prominence in opposing the

in Irish journalism before independence
James Joyce and journalism
Terence Killeen

15 From the ‘Freeman’s General’ to the ‘dully expressed’: James Joyce and journalism Terence Killeen Joyce as a journalist After a series of his articles had appeared in the Triestine newspaper Il Piccolo della Sera on Irish political topics in 1907 James Joyce modestly remarked to his brother, Stanislaus ‘I may not be the Jesus Christ I once fondly imagined myself, but I think I have a talent for journalism.’1 Joyce’s most important journalistic work was indeed carried out in Trieste: before that he had published a lengthy review of Henrik Ibsen’s play When We

in Irish journalism before independence
Alison Morgan

194 Ballads and songs of Peterloo 6 j ‘Freeman stand, or freeman die’: liberty and slavery The words ‘liberty’ or ‘freedom’ feature in forty-three poems in this collection, indicative of the centrality of this theme to the radical discourse of the day. Banners declaring ‘Liberty or Death’ and sticks adorned with caps of liberty were held high by marchers on 16 August whilst they sang ‘God Save the King’ and ‘Rule Britannia’.1 Since the Glorious Revolution of 1688, when a Catholic monarch was replaced by Protestant one without blood being shed, Britain had

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Bertie Wilkinson
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Christine Dade-Robertson
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
James Herbert, The Spear and ‘Nazi Gothic’
Nick Freeman

This article examines the ways in which James Herbert‘s The Spear (1978) attempted to combine nineteenth century gothic with the contemporary thriller. The novel deals with the activities of a neo-Nazi organisation, and the essay draws parallels between Herberts deployment of National Socialism and the treatment of Roman Catholicism in earlier Gothic texts. Contextualising the novel within a wider fascination with Nazism in 1970s popular culture, it also considers the ethical difficulties in applying techniques from supernatural Gothic to secular tyranny.

Gothic Studies
Abstract only
Pierre Arnaud, Nicholas Daly, Tessa Hadley, Nick Freeman, Tim Engles, David Cody, and Diana Wallace

Gothic Studies
Abstract only
Richard Marsh and late Victorian journalism
Nick Freeman

2 •• Tall tales and true: Richard Marsh and late Victorian journalism Nick Freeman Read all about it!: some introductory parallels Richard Marsh was a direct beneficiary of the educational reforms that swept Victorian Britain from 1870 onwards. An insistence upon the practical benefits of literacy created an ever-expanding readership for engaging, accessible and diverting fiction, and armed with a no-frills prose style, a fertile imagination and an ability to meet the tightest deadline, Marsh answered this audience’s call for a quarter of a century, lodging

in Richard Marsh, popular fiction and literary culture, 1890–1915
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

. Fast , L. , Freeman , C. F. , O’Neill , M. and Rowley , E. ( 2013 ), ‘ In Acceptance We Trust? Conceptualising Acceptance as a Viable Approach to NGO Security Management ’, Disasters , 37 : 2 , 222 – 43

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs