Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 187 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Author: Katia Pizzi

This is the first interdisciplinary exploration of machine culture in Italian futurism after the First World War. The machine was a primary concern for the futuristi. As well as being a material tool in the factory it was a social and political agent, an aesthetic emblem, a metonymy of modernity and international circulation and a living symbol of past crafts and technologies. Exploring literature, the visual and performing arts, photography, music and film, the book uses the lens of European machine culture to elucidate the work of a broad set of artists and practitioners, including Censi, Depero, Marinetti, Munari and Prampolini. The machine emerges here as an archaeology of technology in modernity: the time machine of futurism.

Abstract only
Roberto Longhi, seventeenthcentury art, and the Italian avantgarde
Laura Moure Cecchini

In 1913, while reviewing the First Exhibition of Futurist Painting in Rome, a young Italian art historian described the relationship between the two leading avant-gardes of the time by evoking the Seicento: ‘The problem of Futurism with respect to Cubism’, Roberto Longhi declared, ‘is that of the Baroque in relation to the Renaissance.’  1 The Futurists are, of course, well known for their violent rejection of the history of art; they famously claimed, ‘We will destroy museums, libraries

in Baroquemania
Marinetti and technological war
Marja Härmänmaa

16 The dark side of Futurism: Marinetti and technological war Marja Härmänmaa Marja Härmänmaa The dark side of Futurism A survival strategy Marinetti was a specialist in war; as he wrote in 1942, he was ‘the only poet who specialised in modern war’ (Marinetti 1942: 2). Indeed, war was central in both Marinetti’s life and his work: he was actively engaged in warfare, participating in different capacities in four conflicts (Agnese 1990; Salaris 1997; Viola 2004; Guerri 2009).1 In his works, the topics of ‘destruction’ and ‘fighting’ in his pre-Futurist poems

in Back to the Futurists
Maria Elena Versari

5 Futurist canons and the development of avant-garde historiography (Futurism– Expressionism–Dadaism) Maria Elena Versari Maria Elena Versari Futurist canons In 1921, Marc Bloch published an essay entitled ‘Reflections of an historian on the fake news under the war’, in which he justified his interest in that somewhat unusual subject: ‘Our ancestors did not quibble over these sorts of things, they rejected error, when they recognised it as such, and they were not concerned about its repercussions. That’s why the information they left us doesn’t allow us to

in Back to the Futurists
The avant-garde and its Legacy

In 1909, the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Founding Manifesto of Futurism was published on the front page of Le Figaro. Between 1909 and 1912, the Futurists published works celebrating speed and danger, glorifying war and technology, and advocating political and artistic revolution. In Europe, this avant-garde movement was active in the field of painting and sculpture, theatre, photography and politics. This book reassesses the activities and legacies of Futurism. It looks at Futurist manifestos by linking techniques of promotion with practices in commercial advertising, and exploring the question of how Futurist manifestos address notions of genius and gender. The book also reconstructs the historical, cultural and ideological background of Marinetti's Manifesto del tattilismo. Zurich Dadaists adopted cultural stances heavily indebted to the terms of critical engagement and cultural visibility initiated within the Futurist circle. The book analyses avant-garde's examination of its internal strategies of identity and canonization, and the importance of Futurism for the Pierre Albert-Birot. It charts the details of the argument on simultaneity between Umberto Boccioni and Robert Delaunay, and analyses the critical readings of Fernand Léger's La noce. The dialogue between Occultism and Futurism is explored by discussing the theme of night in the works of the Florentine Futurists. In La cucina futurista, food is separated from its nutritional function, and the act of eating is related to notions of creativity and identity. The book presents unique examples of innovative expressivity in Italian Futurists' free-word poems, and examines poetry celebrating the triumph of modern aviation.

Abstract only
Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi

Introduction Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi Elza Adamowicz and Simona Storchi Introduction In 1909 the Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s Founding Manifesto of Futurism was published on the front page of Le Figaro. Between 1909 and 1912 the Futurists published over thirty manifestos, celebrating speed and danger, glorifying war and technology, and advocating political and artistic revolution. In Italy, France, England and Russia, this avant-garde movement was active in the field of painting and sculpture, theatre, photography and politics. After

in Back to the Futurists
Luca Buvoli and the legacy of Futurism
Elisa Sai

18 A Very Beautiful Day After Tomorrow: Luca Buvoli and the legacy of Futurism Elisa Sai Elisa Sai A Very Beautiful Day After Tomorrow As with every anniversary, the centenary of the publication of the Futurist manifesto has stimulated a discussion about the significance and impact of Futurism on its contemporary and later Italian and European culture. In art, it has occasioned a great opportunity to see and appreciate a whole range of works that are not normally available to the public. However, the study and interpretation of Futurist art have always been

in Back to the Futurists
The Vorticist critique of Futurism, 1914–1919
Jonathan Black

10 ‘A hysterical hullo-bulloo about motor cars’: the Vorticist critique of Futurism, 1914–1919 Jonathan Black Jonathan Black ‘A hysterical hullo-bulloo’ Futurism was never likely to be taken at all seriously in the London of King-Emperor George V. It was regarded with disdain, principally because it was championed by Italians who were commonly perceived in England as emotional, hysterical, superficial and economically and technologically backward (Black 2004: 19–20). As Wyndham Lewis put it in ‘Long Live the Vortex!’, published in the first issue of Blast

in Back to the Futurists
Abstract only
The rape of Europa
Katia Pizzi

on display, from the prominent wheels to handlebars and headlights. Thick fumes exhale from a visible exhaust pipe. PIZZI 9780719097096 PRINT.indd 1 16/04/2019 10:21 2 Italian futurism and the machine Pannaggi’s polemic against neoclassical figurative painting, betrayed by this parody, is framed within a representational space dominated by an arresting motorcycle, magnified in its dazzling mechanical appearance. This is more than a motorcycle. Kidnapping and ensconcing a symbolic Europa, it is modernity itself hurling towards the viewer at infernal speed. This

in Italian futurism and the machine
Abstract only
Language and politics in Gramsci and Marinetti
Sascha Bru

was published in 1922, during a period in which Antonio Gramsci, the intellectual leader of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) whose politics too revolved around language (Bru 2005: 119–32), began to take a rather active interest in Futurism. Reading Marinetti’s Futurist poetics, as it is voiced in his Gli indomabili and other writings, alongside Gramsci’s political philosophy of language, my principal aim is to argue that Gramsci may have taken an interest in Futurism because he realised that the movement’s linguistic experimentation indeed came with far

in Back to the Futurists