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G.K. Chesterton

2 Rudyard Kipling (1905) G.K. Chesterton 1 T he first and fairest thing to say about Rudyard Kipling is that he has borne a brilliant part in recovering the lost provinces of poetry. He has not been frightened by that brutal materialistic air which clings only to words; he has pierced through to the romantic, imaginative matter of the things themselves. He has perceived the significance and philosophy of steam and slang. Steam may be, if you like, a dirty by-product of science. Slang may be, if you like, a dirty by-product of language. But at least he has been

in In Time’s eye
Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

Theology, politics, and Newtonian public science

This book explores at length the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, the book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes that are considered to be emblematic of Catholic literature. Its breadth will make it a useful guide for students wishing to become familiar with a wide range of such writings in France and England during this period.

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A conversation on national identity

It could be argued that the English always have discussed their national identity at length, if not 'with arms', and rarely at the dinner table. This book introduces the diversity of reflection on Englishness in a number of stages. 'Versions' of England are particularly apparent when reading contemporary travel writing on and about England. The relationship between the claims of continuity and the claims of change can be captured by understanding Englishness as conversation. The book brings together insights from English history, politics, constitutional affairs, literature, psephology and social psychology to provide a digest of current reflection and is divided into three complementary parts. In the first part, the nuances and subtleties of Englishness are explored. It also explores the conceptual structure and sociological texture of what such a cosmopolitan England would look like. The part discusses conversational etiquette of English national self-identification, the fear of an 'English backlash', and the non-white ethnic minority communities. The second part considers Englishness in politics and institutions. After 1997, the Labour government believed that devolution to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland dealt with England in the appropriately English way: pragmatic adjustment without provocation. It includes discussions on Conservatism and Englishness, Gordon Brown and the negation of England, and the Britain central government. The third part reprises the themes discussed in the previous parts with a historical and literary emphasis. It includes discussions on the changing face of Englishness, and the English union in the writings of Arthur Mee and G.K. Chesterton.

The English union in the writings of Arthur Mee and G.K. Chesterton
Julia Stapleton

years between the two world wars, and from a variety of denominational perspectives (Grimley, 2007 ). The present chapter seeks to build on this research. It does so by examining the work of two journalists and writers who came to prominence in the Edwardian years: Arthur Mee (1875–1943) and G.K. Chesterton (1874–1936). On the surface, at least

in These Englands
Alfred after Victoria
Joanne Parker

excavation at Hyde Abbey in the Express newspaper bore the title, ‘The heat is on to find the king who burnt the cakes’.23 But one (discredited) story was not sufficient to make Alfred rival a King Arthur who, modern criticism adjudges, continued to ‘reverberate in the imagination’ of the twentieth century specifically because of the ‘elements of myth in the Arthurian stories’.24 Between 1902 and 2000, fewer than forty Alfredian texts were published – while works of Arthurian literature numbered in the thousands.25 G.K. Chesterton The importance of legend to Alfred

in ‘England’s darling’
Abstract only
Brian Sudlow

poetry of Paul Verlaine and of Charles Péguy all represent major contributions to the French literary canon. In England, the poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins, the pamphlets of G. K. Chesterton and the novels of Robert Hugh Benson signify the most important revival in Catholic literary production perhaps since Thomas More and Robert Southwell in the sixteenth century. Such are the importance and scope of these two literary trends that the authors involved have attracted considerable critical interest individually and collectively. France

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

Mechanisation is also a strong theme in Benson’s The Lord of the World in which the technologically advanced development of the environment provides an ‘inspiriting’ sight to Benson’s communist characters. 10 In contrast, while in Rome – a city abandoned to the use of ‘backward Catholics’ – the novel’s hero Fr Percy Franklin feels a million miles away from the tensions of modern civilisation and is surrounded by the ‘strange naturalness of life under ancient conditions’. 11 A similar recovery of ancient conditions in city-living is a key theme in G. K. Chesterton’s The

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

convergence in the political reflections of the French and English Catholic writers can be found in the works of Charles Péguy and G. K. Chesterton. The grand theme of mystique over politique , which runs through Péguy’s Notre Jeunesse , is, for example, the very soul of Chesterton’s The Napoleon of Notting Hill in which Adam Wayne, the Provost of Notting Hill, places the honour and identity of Notting Hill before the economic expediency of those who wish to build a major road through its streets. This desire for honour over expediency is crucial, for it anticipates

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
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Sam Rohdie

, the hero and the traitor, and Borges’s narrative of the traitor as hero is the double of the story told by Nolan, who knew the ‘real’ truth, namely that Kilpatrick 70 Film modernism was a traitor. Borges’s story, a fiction of multiple internal citations from Shakespeare including Nolan’s role in Kilpatrick’s contribution of concocting heroism out of betrayal, involves external references and citations to G.K. Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday. Chesterton was one of Borges’s favourite writers. In discovering Nolan’s manuscript, Kilpatrick’s grandson, Ryan

in Film modernism