Editor: C. E. Beneš

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

C. E. Beneš

Here follows part four , which describes the time in which the city of Genoa was converted to the faith of Christ. This part has three chapters: the first chapter explains how the entire world was enslaved to the cult of idolatry. The second chapter explains how Genoa was the first city , or one of the first cities in Italy , to be converted to the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Part one , as stated above , describes those by whom the city of Genoa was founded and constructed. This part has four chapters: chapter one explains who the first founders and builders of the city were. Chapter two relates how Janus , the first king of Italy , constructed and built Genoa. Chapter three relates how Janus , a citizen of Troy , later

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part three , which discusses how Genoa ( Janua 1 ) came to be called by that name. This part has four chapters: the first chapter presents the opinion of those who say that it was named Janua firstly after the Janus who built it , and secondly after the Janus who enlarged it. The second

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part two , which deals with the era of the construction of the city of Genoa. This part has three chapters: the first discusses the era in which the city was founded; the second details the era in which it was expanded , and the third discusses how Genoa was destroyed by the Carthaginians or Africans but rebuilt by the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Here follows part twelve , which contains the names , dates , and orders of all the archbishops who have presided in the city of Genoa up to our own time; this part has as many chapters [eight] as there are names of archbishops. Let us therefore lay out the names and dates of these archbishops in order. Chapter one: Regarding Siro, last bishop and first

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Antigoni Memou

9 Joel Sternfeld’s anti-photojournalistic images of Genoa J o e l Sternfeld’s Treading on Kings: Protesting the G8 in Genoa is a series of twenty-seven formal portraits, which form the basic body of a book, published on the occasion of an exhibition of Sternfeld’s project at the White Box Gallery in New York.1 The photographs were taken during the anti-globalisation protests in Genoa in 2001, and document the diversity of participants in the transnational movement against neoliberal globalisation. The movement, which took to the streets in Seattle, Prague

in Photography and social movements
C. E. Beneš

Part eleven describes the dates , names , and orders of all the bishops who are recorded as having existed in the city of Genoa. This part has as many chapters [nineteen] as the names of the bishops who are included here. Regarding the time in which the city of Genoa first received a bishopric, we expressed our opinion

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
From the globalisation of the movement (1968) to the movement against globalisation (2001)
Author: Antigoni Memou

Throughout its brief history, photography has had a close relationship to social movements. From the Commune of Paris in 1871, the first political uprising to be captured by camera, to the 1990s anti-globalisation movement, the photographic medium has played a crucial role in political struggles. The book reflects critically on the theory of photography and the social movements themselves. It draws on a range of humanities disciplines, including photography theory and history, social movement theory, political theory, cultural history, visual culture, media studies and the history and theory of art. The book takes as a starting point 1968 - a year that witnessed an explosion of social movements worldwide and has been interpreted as a turning point for political practice and theory. The finishing point is 2001 - a signpost for international politics due to September 11 and a significant year for the movement because of the large-scale anti-capitalist protests in Genoa. Within these chronological limits, the book focuses on a selection of distinctive instances in which the photographic medium intersects with the political struggle. The three case studies are not the only pertinent examples, by any means, but they are important ones, not only historically and politically, but also iconographically. They are the student and worker uprising in France in May 1968 and two moments of the contemporary anti-capitalist movement, the indigenous Zapatista movement in Mexico and the anti-capitalist protests in Genoa in 2001.

C. E. Beneš

Here follows part ten , which deals with the spiritual governance of the city of Genoa. This part has two chapters: the first explains the time in which the city was awarded the honour of a bishopric , while the second explains the time in which it was raised to the dignity of an archbishopric. Chapter one: When

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa