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Representing naval manhood in the British Empire, 1870–1918
Author: Mary A. Conley

The later nineteenth century was a time of regulation and codification, which was part of the Victorian search for reliability and respectability. This book examines the intersection between empire, navy, and manhood in British society from 1870 to 1918. It sheds light upon social and cultural constructions of working-class rather than elite masculinities by focusing on portrayals of non-commissioned naval men, the 'lower deck', rather than naval officers. Through an analysis of sources that include courts-martial cases, sailors' own writings, and the HMS Pinafore, the book charts new depictions of naval manhood during the Age of Empire. It was a period of radical transformation of the navy, intensification of imperial competition, democratisation of British society, and advent of mass culture. The book argues that popular representations of naval men increasingly reflected and informed imperial masculine ideals in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. It explains how imperial challenges, technological changes and domestic pressures transformed the navy and naval service from the wake of the Crimean War to the First World War. How female-run naval philanthropic organisations domesticated the reputation of naval men by refashioning the imagery of the drunken debauched sailor through temperance and evangelical campaigns is explained. The naval temperance movement was not singular in revealing the clear class dimensions in the portrayal of naval manhood. The book unveils how the British Bluejacket as both patriotic defender and dutiful husband and father stood in sharp contrast to the stereotypic image of the brave but bawdy tar of the Georgian navy.

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Gender, navy and empire
Mary A. Conley

. In The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy , Nicholas Rodger argues that the eighteenth-century public image of Jack Tar was of the ‘sailor on a run ashore, probably drunk and riotous’. 2 In depictions from the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, popular representations of sailors noted the disjuncture between the sailor’s character afloat and ashore. While the sailor might be

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
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Britain and the sea
Jan Rüger

/2006/naval-history, 25 May 2006 (accessed 11 July 2013).   2 Matthew Seligmann, ‘The Renaissance of Pre-First World War Naval History’, Journal of Strategic Studies, 36 (2013), 454–79.  3 N. A. M. Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (London: Collins, 1986); N. A. M. Rodger, The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, vol. 2: 1649–1815 (London: Allen Lane, 2004).   4 Paul M. Kennedy, The Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery (London: Allen Lane, 1976; with a new introduction, London: Penguin, 2016).  5 Eckart Kehr

in A new naval history
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Warrant officers in the Royal Navy, 1775–1815
Evan Wilson

Particular skills v 1 v Particular skills: warrant officers in the Royal Navy, 1775–1815 Evan Wilson Warrant officers are the forgotten men of the Georgian navy. Above them, commissioned officers have received substantial historical attention, beginning with, but not limited to, the ever-increasing biographies of Nelson.1 Below them, the lower deck has come under growing scrutiny, much of it focused on the question of impressment.2 Warrant officers of wardroom rank, on the other hand, have only been studied in fits and starts. These men – the master, the

in A new naval history
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Michael Brown and Joanne Begiato

in Romantic Military Art (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013). 14 Jeremy Black, Naval Power: A History of Warfare and the Sea from 1500 Onwards (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009); N. A. M. Rodgers, The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain, 660–1649 (London: Penguin, 1997); N. A. M. Rodgers, The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649–1815 (London: Penguin, 2004); Brian Lavery, Nelson’s Navy: The Ships, Men and Organisation 1793–1815 (London: Conway, 1989). 15 N. A. M. Rodgers, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (Glasgow

in Martial masculinities
Contrasting articulations with the Atlantic world
Chris Evans

. 5 L. M. Cullen, ‘The Irish diaspora of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, in Nicholas Canny (ed.), Europeans on the Move: Studies in European Migration, 1500–1800 (Oxford, 1994), pp. 112–49, especially pp. 123–5. 6 N. A. M. Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (Glasgow, 1986), p. 83. 7 A. J. March, ‘The local community and the operation of Plymouth Dockyard, 1689–1763’, in Michael Duffy, Stephen Fisher, Basil

in Wales and the British overseas empire
Naval officers’ experiences of slave-trade suppression
Mary Wills

Prize’, p. 102. However, such disciplinary action should also be understood in the context of the harsh punishments handed out to sailors. See N. A. M Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (London: Fontana Press, 1986), chapter 6. 76 Philip D. Curtin, The Image of Africa

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
A case study in eighteenth-century naval commemoration and material culture
Katherine Parker

Alley Royal Exchange’. BL G.316.a. (27.). 24 Frank Felsenstein, ‘Unravelling Ann Mills: Some Notes on Gender Construction and Naval Heroism’, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 19 (2006), 213; Wilson, ‘How Nelson Became a Hero’, p. 6; Fulford, ‘Romanticizing the Empire’, 7, 9; Hill, ‘National Bodies’, 418. Such heroism based on active service applied not only to officers but extended down the command structure to ordinary seamen by the late eighteenth century. Land, War, Nationalism, pp. 91, 103. 25 N. A. M. Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (London

in A new naval history
Disciplining indecency and sodomy in the Edwardian fleet
Mary Conley

. Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (New York: Norton, 1986), pp. 80–1.   5 Isaac Land, ‘The Many-Tongued Hydra: Sea Talk, Maritime Culture, and Atlantic Identities, 1700–1850’, Journal of American and Comparative Cultures, 25 (2002), 412–17; Quintin Colville, ‘Enacted and Re-enacted in Life and Letters: The Identity of Jack Tar, 1930 to Date’, Journal for Maritime Research, 18:1 (2016), 37–53; Andrew S. Thompson, Writing Imperial Histories (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016); Brad Beaven, Karl Bell and Robert James (eds), Port Towns

in A new naval history
Coping with separation during the Napoleonic Wars (the Fremantle papers, 1800–14)
Elaine Chalus

American Journal of Family Therapy, 43:3 (2015), 283–95.   3 N. A. M. Rodger, The Wooden World: An Anatomy of the Georgian Navy (London: Fontana Press, 1988), pp. 134–5.   4 N. A. M. Rodger, The Command of the Ocean: A Naval History of Britain, 1649–1815 (London: Penguin, 2005), p. 407.   5 N. A. M. Rodger ‘Recent Books on the Royal Navy of the Eighteenth Century’, Journal of Military History, 63:3 (1999), 694. See Cindy McCreery, ‘True Blue and Black, Brown and Fair: Prints of British Sailors and their Women during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars’, British

in A new naval history