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Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state
Author: Shivdeep Grewal

From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. This book is the first in-depth account of his project. Emphasis is placed on the conception of the European Union (EU) that informed his political prescriptions. This study engages with Habermas's thought as a totality, though attention is focussed on themes such as communicative rationality that began to surface in the 1970s. The first part of the book considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe - 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that has assailed the project of modernity in recent decades with renewed intensity in the wake of 9/11. The final section looks at the conceptual landscape of the Constitutional Convention. The groundbreaking work of E. O. Eriksen, E. F. Fossum and others provides the most developed Habermasian account of the EU to date. Juridification is put forward as a metatheory of social modernity, and existing approaches from the corpus of European integration theory are drawn. Recent political theory confronts scholars of European integration with difficult questions. The social democrats who were interviewed had the opposite combination of opinions.

Social and cultural modernity beyond the nation-state
Author: Shivdeep Grewal

German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has written extensively on the European Union. This is the only in-depth account of his project. Published now in a second edition to coincide with the celebration of his ninetieth birthday, a new preface considers Habermas’s writings on the eurozone and refugee crises, populism and Brexit, and the presidency of Emmanuel Macron.

Placing an emphasis on the conception of the EU that informs Habermas’s political prescriptions, the book is divided into two main parts. The first considers the unfolding of 'social modernity' at the level of the EU. Among the subjects covered are Habermas's concept of juridification, the latter's affinities with integration theories such as neofunctionalism, and the application of Habermas's democratic theory to the EU. The second part addresses 'cultural modernity' in Europe – 'Europessimism' is argued to be a subset of the broader cultural pessimism that assailed the project of modernity in the late twentieth century, and with renewed intensity in the years since 9/11.

Interdisciplinary in approach, this book engages with European/EU studies, critical theory, political theory, international relations, intellectual history, comparative literature, and philosophy. Concise and clearly written, it will be of interest to students, scholars and professionals with an interest in these disciplines, as well as to a broader readership concerned with the future of Europe

Der Blaue Reiter and its legacies
Author: Dorothy Price

This book presents new research on the histories and legacies of the German Expressionist group, Der Blaue Reiter, the founding force behind modernist abstraction. For the first time Der Blaue Reiter is subjected to a variety of novel inter-disciplinary perspectives, ranging from a philosophical enquiry into its language and visual perception, to analyses of its gender dynamics, its reception at different historical junctures throughout the twentieth century, and its legacies for post-colonial aesthetic practices. The volume offers a new perspective on familiar aspects of Expressionism and abstraction, taking seriously the inheritance of modernism for the twenty-first century in ways that will help to recalibrate the field of Expressionist studies for future scholarship. Der Blaue Reiter still matters, the contributors argue, because the legacies of abstraction are still being debated by artists, writers, philosophers and cultural theorists today.

Open Access (free)
Mads Qvortrup

a dialogue with the author. We come to the classic text from within our personal hermeneutic horizons, which colour our reading. Yet this does not mean that we cannot learn from the classic. As German philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer puts it (Gadamer 1960: 184), our ‘preconception’ (Vorurteile) may colour our reading but the process goes both ways, and in the process of reading, our own ‘hermeneutic horizon’ changes as a result of our reading. By engaging with the text we modify our prejudices –and broaden our horizon. It is the latter part of the ‘Hermeneutic

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Leonie Holthaus

scepticism about Germany’s capacity to develop a democratic government on its own. 53 Like other liberals, Hobhouse began to support the war after the publication of ‘the manifesto of the ninety-three’ 54 (1914), in which many German professors declared their support for the government’s decision to go to war. He was perturbed by the fact that well-known colleagues with socialist sympathies and many international contacts, such as the German philosopher and psychologist Wilhelm Wundt, had signed the manifesto. 55 Another reason for his change of mind was probably the

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Ali Rattansi

first postmodern. Postmodernism thus understood is not modernism at its end but in the nascent state, and this state is constant’ (1984: 79; see also 1988: 276)). Moreover, in this essay he jousts with the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas in a discussion of the significance of the Enlightenment. Habermas, in a widely read article, ‘Modernity: An Incomplete Project’ (1981; all references are to the reprinted version, Habermas 1983), regarded not just the Enlightenment but the whole promise of Western modernity as threatened by the new postmodern thinkers, especially

in Bauman and contemporary sociology
Walker Evans’s polaroids
Caroline Blinder

comparison to his more iconic 1930s documentary work – as exemplary of the ‘Romantic fragment’; that is to say, as works that present themselves as part of, or fragments of, larger projects, and that do so in ways that are both self-conscious and deliberate. In this respect, the concept of the Romantic fragment is read by the eighteenth-century German philosopher Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel as part of a longer process within modernism, indicative of the moment when incompletion and fragmentation, rather than acting as a failure, represent the most productive means for

in Mixed messages
Abstract only
Peter Barry

Beginnings and basics of Marxism Karl Marx (1818–83), a German philosopher, and Friedrich Engels (1820–95), a German sociologist (as he would now be called), were the joint founders of this school of thought. Marx was the son of a lawyer but spent most of his life in great poverty as a political exile from Germany living in Britain (he was expelled after the 1848 ‘year of revolutions’). Engels had left Germany in 1842 to work in Manchester for his father's textile firm. They met after Marx had read an article by Engels in a journal to which they both

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
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Modernity, welfare state and Eutopia
Shivdeep Grewal

‘Flow and boundary’ – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. (Habermas, 2001 ) 1 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought

in Habermas and European integration
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Modernity, welfare state and EUtopia
Shivdeep Grewal

Introduction Modernity, welfare state and EUtopia “Flow and boundary” – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. —Habermas, 19981 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought, precludes a straightforward

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)