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The monstrous feminine as femme animale
Barbara Creed

stars in a range of films including: The Company of Wolves (1984, dir. Neil Jordan), Howling II (1985, dir. Philippe Mora), Wolf (1994, dir. Mike Nichols), An American Werewolf in Paris (1997, dir. Anthony Waller), Blood and Chocolate (2007, dir. Katja von Garnier), Ginger Snaps (2000, dir. John Fawcett), Ginger Snaps 2: Unleashed (2004, dir. Brett Sullivan); Ginger Snaps Back

in She-wolf
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A cultural history of female werewolves
Editor: Hannah Priest

This book explores the cultural history of the female werewolf, from her first appearance in medieval literature to recent incarnations in film, television and popular literature. It focuses on folkloric records of the island of Saaremaa, Estonia, a territory in which, unusually, there are more folktales of female werewolves than male. The book also explores tropes and strategies of feminisation evident in Werewolf: The Apocalypse to reveal an almost unique disavowal of the masculine werewolf in favour of traditions of presenting the female werewolf. The examination of Honoré Beaugrand's 'The Werewolves' offers fruitful discussion of the female werewolf's integration into colonial discourse and narrative. In the nineteenth century, at the fin de siècle, female authors began to produce fiction about the female werewolf. Two of the most interesting examples of this, which have been curiously neglected by critics, are Clemence Housman's novella The Werewolf and Rosamund Marriott Watson's poem 'A Ballad of the Were-wolf', written under the pseudonym Graham R. Tomson and published in 1891. Then, the book examines twenty-first-century young adult paranormal romance texts, considering the ways in which such texts associate lycanthropy with contemporary idealisations and constructions of the post-adolescent female. It explores presentations of body-centred violence in film, drawing parallels between female werewolves and other violent females in horror cinema. Finally, the book also examines cinematic representations of the femme animale with an exploration of how this conceptualisation of the feminine might inform a reading of Ginger Snaps.

Boobs, blood and sacrifice
Hannah Priest

. However, the night that Kelsey starts menstruating is the night she first becomes a werewolf. In this respect, ‘Boobs’ has some parallels with the horror film Ginger Snaps (2000, dir. John Fawcett), in which the connection between female lycanthropy and adolescence is also explored. Nevertheless, there are some marked differences between Charnas’s story and Ginger Snaps , and these have much to do with

in She-wolf
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A history of female werewolves
Hannah Priest

sexualised, vibrant femininity. Reference is made to the problematic associations of female werewolves to both the vagina dentata and the female reproductive cycle – associations explored by Barbara Creed in her consideration of Ginger Snaps (2000, dir. John Fawcett) – by having the singer dance around in a red-lined cave-like set, which is highly suggestive of a vagina. However

in She-wolf
Peter Hutchings

film Ginger Snaps (2000, dir. John Fawcett), which is possibly the best-known of all contemporary female werewolf stories. Its pointed association of female sexual maturation with lycanthropic transformation has generated a great deal of discussion about the extent to which this, and other representations of its kind, supports a progressive feminist critique of oppressive patriarchal

in She-wolf
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Shape-shifting and subjectivity
Laura Wilson

contemporary cult classics like An American Werewolf in London (1981, dir. John Landis) and Ginger Snaps (2000, dir. John Fawcett), the protagonist’s journey is fairly predictable. For example, the destined-to-be werewolf gets injured, often by something unknown to them at the time. After this injury is incurred the victim begins to experience certain changes. The wound may heal unnaturally quickly, or the

in She-wolf
The sound of the cinematic werewolf
Stacey Abbott

physical pain and suffering continues to inform representations of the werewolf in film and television from Ginger Snaps to Being Human . Conclusion An American Werewolf in London offers a modern reimagining of the werewolf set within a recognisably contemporaneous world but, rather than highlighting its difference from the classic werewolf films that preceded it, such as Werewolf of London and The Wolf Man , the film acknowledges its predecessors and builds upon their emotional complexity; complexity

in In the company of wolves
Young Adult literature and the metaphorical wolf
Kaja Franck

. 29 Bouchard, Quinze lieux communs les armes , p. 177 (my translation). 30 Creed, ‘ Ginger Snaps ’, p. 188. 31 Gutenberg, ‘Shape-shifters from the Wilderness’, p. 172

in In the company of wolves
The metafictional meanings of lycanthropic transformations in Doctor Who
Ivan Phillips

American Werewolf in London ( 1981 ), but others seem to confirm it. Neither Henry Hull's stiff (in the non-priapic sense) Glendon in Werewolf of London nor Lon Chaney, Jr's ‘lumbering, affable’ and ‘repressed’ Larry Talbot in The Wolf Man ( 1941 ) can be said to generate much sensual potential. 24 Interestingly, many narratives of recent decades have foregrounded the carnal intensity of the lycanthropic mythos, including John Fawcett's film Ginger Snaps ( 2000 ) and Toby Whithouse's television series Being Human

in In the company of wolves
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Doppelgängers and doubling in The Vampire Diaries
Kimberley McMahon-Coleman

postmodern Gothic narratives (such as Poppy Z. Brite’s novel Lost Souls or the Canadian Ginger Snaps werewolf movies) replicate nuclear family units located within their ‘normal, contemporary … setting[s] … to expose the dysfunction beneath this veneer of stability’. In contrast, The Vampire Diaries rejects the nuclear family as a social unit completely, while still focusing on the

in Open Graves, Open Minds