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Author: Peter Marks

This book argues the centrality of hybridity to Terry Gilliam's films. Gilliam had a collaborative approach to filmmaking and a desire to provoke audiences to their own interpretations as other forms of intertextual practice. Placing Gilliam in the category of cinematic fantasist does some preliminary critical work, but crudely homogenises the diversity of his output. One way of marking this range comes from understanding that Gilliam employs an extraordinary variety of genres. These include medieval comedy; children's historical adventure; dystopian satire; the fantastic voyage; science fiction; Gonzo Journalism; fairy tale; and gothic horror. Gilliam's work with Monty Python assured him a revered place in the history of that medium in Britain. As a result, the Python films, And Now for Something Completely Different, The Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life, along with his own, Jabberwocky, Time Bandits, and Brazil, show him moving successfully into the British film industry. Most of his films have been adaptations of literary texts, and Jabberwocky forges an extended tale of monsters and market forces. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen builds on some tales from the original texts, constructing a complex examination of fantasy, representation and mortality. Taking crucial ingredients from medieval and older mythologies, the screenplay of The Fisher King resituates them and reworks them for modern America. Gilliam's complex interaction with Britain and America explains his ambiguous place in accounts of American and British films.

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Peter Marks

. Gilliam had been working on the long-term project Theseus and the Minotaur with a new collaborator, the English screenwriter Tony Grisoni, when in a holiday break he got the chance to direct a film already well advanced in planning, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas . Based on Hunter. S. Thompson’s classic of Gonzo Journalism, 1 which was first published in two articles for Rolling Stone

in Terry Gilliam
Abstract only
Peter Marks

crudely homogenises the diversity of his output. One way of marking this range comes from understanding that Gilliam employs an extraordinary variety of genres: medieval comedy; children’s historical adventure; dystopian satire; the fantastic voyage; science fiction; Gonzo Journalism; fairy tale; and gothic horror. Each genre rejects or reworks the norms of realism, but in distinct ways, so that the

in Terry Gilliam
Why some of us push our bodies to extremes
Author: Jenny Valentish

This book is about people willing to do the sorts of things that most others couldn't, shouldn't or wouldn't. While there are all sorts of reasons why people consume substances, the author notes that there are those who treat drug-taking like an Olympic sport, exploring their capacity to really push their bodies, and frankly, wanting to be the best at it. Extreme athletes, death-defiers and those who perform incredible stunts of endurance have been celebrated throughout history. The most successful athletes can compartmentalise, storing away worry and pain in a part of their brain so it does not interfere with their performance. The brain releases testosterone, for a boost of strength and confidence. In bondage, discipline, sadism and masochism (BDSM) play, the endogenous opioid system responds to the pain, releasing opioid peptides. It seems some of us are more wired than others to activate those ancient biological systems, be it through being caned in a dungeon during a lunchbreak or climbing a sheer rock wall at the weekend. Back in 1990, sociologist Stephen Lyng coined the term 'edgework', now frequently used in BDSM circles, as 'voluntary pursuit of activities that involve a high potential for death, physical injury, or spiritual harm'.

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Porn Stars
Jenny Valentish

Chapter Six THIS IS HARDCORE Porn Stars R UMOUR HAS IT that after Bridgette Kerkove retired from porn, she changed her name and found God. It’s not an unpopular retirement plan in the industry. She’s been at the back of my mind for the past twenty years, dating back to when we both worked in pornography. I was a subeditor for the American adult magazines Club and Club Confidential, also writing most of the content, including interviews with the top performers. Bridgette was riding the crest of the wave that was gonzo. Gonzo porn was similar to gonzo

in Everything harder than everyone else
Peter Marks

reductive reading of Gilliam merely as a fantasist (as if that term was itself a form of criticism), for his films utilise genres and themes as diverse as science fiction, Gothic horror, nonsense poetry, fairy tales, imaginary travels, medieval myth, Gonzo Journalism and dystopias. The literary element of this not exhaustive list registers the fact that for all the alluring and magical imagery of his films (another aspect

in Terry Gilliam