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Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
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This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

-European world that both he, as a person, and the settings in which he suffers, as settings, seem to me to be very real. When you have finished the book you, too, will have suffered and had your own emotions in the rue de la Paix.5 In order to really know one’s fictional – and actual – surroundings, one must be made to suffer by them (perhaps this is why Dowell needs to return to places and parts of his story in The Good Soldier – his ignorance protects him from suffering). Suffering renders the relationship Lawrence would desire: the trembling of emotion in the response of

in Fragmenting modernism
Sara Haslam

to Ford’s representation of heaven in the poem is the reflecting, ‘lonely old moon’, which seems to threaten its existence. As the chapter proceeds, the moon’s watchfulness is 158 Fragmenting modernism reconstructed as part of Ford’s fantastical solution to the fragmenting experience of the divided self. The Young Lovell The Young Lovell was written and published in 1913; it was the novel before The Good Soldier. Though Saunders writes that both these texts are ‘studies of the power of desire to enrapture and to endanger and of the conflicts between sexuality

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

of the English Review, author of The Good Soldier and transformer of Ezra Pound’s verse, he performed a vital part. Indeed, Max Saunders writes in his magisterial biography of Ford that ‘the period of literary modernism is “the Ford era” as much as it is Pound’s, or T. S. Eliot’s, or Joyce’s’; Ford was ‘at the centre of the three most innovative groups of writers this century’.4 In addition, the language of decline, collapse and fragmentation is commonly applied by historical analysts to events and developments of the early twentieth century. These were the years

in Fragmenting modernism
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Masculinities, ‘philanthrocapitalism’ and the military-industrial complex
Laura Clancy

‘look good’ and hence generates profit. 3 Specifically, the chapter argues that representations of Harry articulate narratives of redemption through philanthropy, both in the redemptive masculinities of his royal figure and in the redemption of the ‘good soldier’ from a ‘bad war’ in producing consent for the ‘War on Terror’. I do not aim to present soldiers as victims, or to simplify the positive work Invictus does in helping veteran recovery. Rather, I aim to document the corporate function of contemporary warfare

in Running the Family Firm
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Anglophobia in Fascist Italy traces the roots of Fascist Anglophobia from the Great War and through the subsequent peace treaties and its development during the twenty years of Mussolini’s regime. Initially, Britain was seen by many Italians as a ‘false friend’ who was also the main obstacle to Italy’s foreign policy aspirations, a view embraced by Mussolini and his movement. While at times dormant, this Anglophobic sentiment did not disappear in the years that followed, and was later rekindled during the Ethiopian War. The peculiarly Fascist contribution to the assessment of Britain was ideological. From the mid-1920s, the regime’s intellectuals saw Fascism as the answer to a crisis in the Western world and as irredeemably opposed to Western civilisation of the sort exemplified by Britain. Britain was described as having failed the ‘problem of labour’, and Fascism framed as a salvation ideology, which nations would either embrace or face decay. The perception of Britain as a decaying and feeble nation increased after the Great Depression. The consequence of this was a consistent underrating of British power and resolve to resist Italian ambitions. An analysis of popular reception of the Fascist discourse shows that the tendency to underrate Britain had permeated large sectors of the Italian people, and that public opinion was more hostile to Britain than previously thought. Indeed, in some quarters hatred towards the British lasted until the end of the Second World War, in both occupied and liberated Italy.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

faintest of smiles, the simplest of words, the slightest gesture’, and whilst the comparison with James is well-judged, Mizener misses the edge to this text, one that raises its game and enables comparison of its drama with that of The Good Soldier and Parade’s End.1 Freud has much to say of the active implications of ‘civilized society’. This society is one that demands good conduct and does not trouble itself about the instinctual basis of this conduct, [and] has thus won over to obedience a great many people who are not in this following their own natures. Encouraged

in Fragmenting modernism
Flaubert’s Parrot
Peter Childs

impacting on authors and readers in postwar society. Before a set of elliptical asterisks, Barnes playfully underlines the metafictional element of his novel with Braithwaite’s narration trailing off in a series of hesitations and apologies. He describes himself as a diffident narrator, addressing the reader directly as though a confidante met on the ferry, and thus recalls narrators in such archetypal modernist novels as Albert Camus’s The Fall and Ford Madox Ford’s The Good Soldier . Braithwaite adds later in the chapter that ‘Nothing much about my character matters

in Julian Barnes
Towards the absurd
Neil Cornwell

other positions are equally unverifiable’; indeed, the ‘fact’ that these couples are at all engaged in fashionable love-games remains ‘precisely one we cannot verify’ (Kappeler, 192; 200). According to Barbara Hardy, ‘this novel is a perfect illustration, in its action and its effect’, of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle.16 A link, in both a biographical and a literary sense, between Conrad and James is Ford Madox Ford and his later, supremely modernist novel, The Good Soldier (1915). Ford lived for a while near Conrad, with whom he collaborated on a number of

in The absurd in literature
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

). Far from asking the reader to view the text from a complex set of perspectives, as in The Good Soldier, Ford asks instead for sympathy and sensitivity, to fantastical, Pre-Raphaelite-laced, impressions. The Owl is loyal and kindly, powerful and wise, and is Brown’s 128 Fragmenting modernism representative in Ford’s imaginative universe. Madox Brown always held such a position, thus providing Ford with one of the ‘static verities’ of his life.29 The book was published in 1891, following Brown’s persuasions at T. Fisher Unwin via Edward Garnett. It thus owes its

in Fragmenting modernism