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Dominic Janes

In the early gothic literature of the eighteenth century danger lurked in the darkness beneath the pointed arches of gothic buildings. During the nineteenth century, there was a progressive, although never complete, dislocation of gothic literary readings from gothic architecture. This article explores a phase in that development through discussion of a series of dark illustrations produced by Hablot Knight Browne to illustrate novels by Charles Dickens. These show the way in which the rounded arches of neo-classical architecture were depicted in the mid-nineteenth century as locales of oppression and obscurity. Such depictions acted, in an age of political and moral reform, to critique the values of the system of power and authority that such architecture represented.

Gothic Studies
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A guide to dark visibilities

Gothic as a genre has become more amorphous and difficult to contain. This book brings together for the first time many of the multifarious visual motifs and media associated with Gothic together with areas that have never received serious study or mention in this regard before. It draws attention to an array of dark artefacts such as Goth and Gothic jewellery, dolls, posters and food, which, though part of popular mass marketing, have often been marginalised and largely omitted from the mainstream of Gothic Studies publishing. The book moves from the earliest Gothic architecture to décor and visual aspects of theatrical design, masquerade and dance. It focuses on paintings in two historical spans from Jan Van Eyck to Henry Fuseli and from Goya to H. R. Giger to consider Clovis Trouille's works influenced by horror films and Vincent Castiglia's paintings in blood. Gothic engravings, motifs of spectral portraits, posters and signs are covered. The book then uses early visual devices like Eidophusikon and the long-lived entertainment of peepshows to introduce a discussion of projection technologies like magic lanterns and, subsequently, film and TV. Gothic photography from Daguerreotypes onwards; and Gothic font, scripts and calligraphy are then discussed. Finally, the book presents a survey of the development of newer Gothic media, such as video gaming, virtual reality (VR) games and survival horror apps.

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David Annwn Jones

1.1 Gothic and Gothic Revival architecture It is possible to argue that the pointed arch and pointed rib vault (consisting of arches supporting an enclosed space within a barrel structure or tunnel) comprise the foundational epitome of Gothic architectural style. These shapes, together with spires, crenellations, soaring buttresses, piers with

in Gothic effigy
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David Annwn Jones

painter of the late fifteenth century, with much later Gothic architecture and art. Though one of course keeps specific and distinct historical contexts in mind, it is notable that critics and writers, in identifying traces of Bosch’s influence in Lovecraft’s monsters, are increasingly arranging and re-assigning such cultural artefacts due to properties perceived to be held in common. In writing of Gothic

in Gothic effigy
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Historicising the gothic corporeal

The body is a potential marker of monstrosity, identifying those who do not fit into the body politic. Irregularity and the grotesque have been associated with Gothic architecture and are also indicative of wayward flesh and its deformities. Through an investigation of the body and its oppression by the church, the medical profession and the state, this book reveals the actual horrors lying beneath fictional horror in settings as diverse as the monastic community, slave plantation, operating theatre, Jewish ghetto and battlefield trench. Original readings of canonical Gothic literary and film texts include The Castle of Otranto, The Monk, Frankenstein, Dracula and Nosferatu. This collection of fictionalised dangerous bodies will be traced back to the effects of the English Reformation, Spanish Inquisition, French Revolution, Caribbean slavery, Victorian medical malpractice, European anti-Semitism and finally warfare, ranging from the Crimean up to the Vietnam War. Dangerous Bodies demonstrates how the Gothic corpus is haunted by a tangible sense of corporeality, often at its most visceral. Chapters set out to vocalise specific body parts such as skin, genitals, the nose and eyes, as well as blood. The endangered or dangerous body lies at the centre of the clash between victim and persecutor and has generated tales of terror and narratives of horror, which function to either salve, purge or dangerously perpetuate such oppositions. This ground-breaking book will be of interest to academics and students of Gothic studies, gender and film studies and especially to readers interested in the relationship between history and literature.

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E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

sublime in landscape; changing conceptions of the passions, particularly the question of representing the psychology of villainy; the ideological meanings of Gothic architecture. All of these are touched on here, but could be illustrated far more extensively. However, part of our justification would be that sensibility, the natural sublime and the ‘Gothic revival’ in architecture are already the subject of many substantial

in Gothic documents
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William Blake's Gothic relations
David Baulch

Malkin's account of his Gothicism, at which time he recasts the scene as the very moment that Gothic architecture comes to England. When Blake revisits his engraving of Joseph, he inscribes the following under it: JOSEPH of Arimathea among The Rocks of Albion Engraved by W Blake 1773 from an old Italian Drawing This is One of the Gothic Artists who built the

in William Blake's Gothic imagination
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Chris Bundock and Elizabeth Effinger

William Blake, ‘Albions Angel rose …’, Europe a Prophecy , copy A, plate 12 (Bentley 14) (1794 [1795]). Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection. Blake's oeuvre teems with Gothic iconography. The twisted, ominous trees of Songs of Innocence recall the theory developed by James Hall in Essay on the Origin and Principles of Gothic Architecture (1797

in William Blake's Gothic imagination
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Derek Robbins

Philosophy without Subject’ (Bourdieu and Passeron, 1967b); ‘Systèmes d’enseignement et systèmes de pensée’ [systems of education and systems of thought] (Bourdieu, 1967); ‘Éléments d’une théorie sociologique de la perception artistique’ [elements of a sociological theory of art perception] (Bourdieu, 1968a); and ‘Structuralism and Theory of Sociological Knowledge’ (Bourdieu, 1968b). The significance of these texts has to be discussed in the context of Bourdieu’s translation of Panofsky’s Gothic Architecture and Scholastic Thought, with an afterword (Panofsky, ed. Bourdieu

in The Bourdieu paradigm
Unearthing the uncanny in Alan Moore’s A Small Killing, From Hell and A Disease of Language
Christopher Murray

Gothic architecture of Christ Church looms over him. He ponders ‘ancient anatomical imperatives’, noting that ‘motive is implicit in the brickwork’ (94.ii). The environment remains saturated with the violence that the Ripper perpetrated, and it seeps into the consciousness of those who are drawn to the area, but as he notes, ‘I keep coming back’ (94.iii). This is a territory that

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition