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Matěj Antoš and Petr Hrtánek

This study maps the influence of the Gothic mode in the Czech postmodern prose, especially in the novels published at the turn of the millennium: it primarily concerns books by Václav Vokolek, Miloš Urban and Jan Jandourek. Through analyticalinterpretative probes into these texts are demonstrated the main possibilities of the Gothic mode and consequences of its implementation in the contemporary Czech literature: distortion of the perspective and blurring of the individual identity, instability of the setting, expression of civilizational and existential fears. The study illustrates capturing of the key Gothic themes in the analyzed works of fiction and also the specific transformation and modification of these topics within individual author poetics. Special attention is particularly given to specifics of the setting, often combining typical Gothic topoi, which may be part of seriously intended opposition of the sacral and the profane, or they can also be presented as exposed cliché sceneries.

Gothic Studies
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Hearing Voices in L. M. Montgomery‘s Emily Climbs and F. W. H. Myers
Kate Lawson

The novels of L. M. Montgomery‘s Emily trilogy belong to the genre of domestic fiction, but they are punctuated by uncanny events, by excursions into a Gothic mode where the girl‘s smooth transition from rebellious child to compliant adult is disrupted. This paper is an investigation of Montgomerys use of Gothic tropes in the second novel of the trilogy, Emily Climbs (1925); in particular, this essay analyses the chapter entitled ‘In the Watches of the Night’, a chapter that is exemplary of Montgomery‘s use of the Gothic mode to disrupt the disciplinary system that enjoins the adolescent girl to situate her desires in the home. The chapter is permeated by Montgomery‘s reading in abnormal psychology, particularly by F. W. H. Myerss Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death (1903), a work that lends a scientific veneer to Montgomerys Gothicism with its account of what ‘hearing voices’ means. In an extravagantly gothic metaphor, Slavoj Zizek claims that the ‘life of a voice’ is ‘the uncanny life of an undead monster, not the “healthy” living self-presence of meaning’ (103). Montgomery‘s text arguably excavates a moment which reveals both the speaking subject and the ideology which disciplines it to be marked by the uncanny, by that which undermines ‘the “healthy” living self-presence of meaning’.

Gothic Studies
Character Doubling and Social Critique in the Short Fiction
A. A. Markley

As she had done in Frankenstein, Mary Shelley reworked the gothic dopplegänger motif time and again in her short fiction not only to entertain but also to educate her readers. Focusing on four tales written in the late 1820s and early 1830s, this paper considers how Shelley repeatedly set up a triangle of desire in which an intensely competitive and destructive relationship between men is mitigated or resolved by a female character. A close look at these tales contributes to our understanding of the extent to which Mary Shelley devoted herself to remodelling Gothic modes. More importantly, these tales demonstrate the degree to which her ‘New Gothic’ was intended to contribute to a reconfiguration of traditional gender roles and a revaluation of the domestic affections, particularly in terms of their relevance to the political arena.

Gothic Studies
Road Trips, Globalisation, and the War on Terror
Kyle William Bishop

American zombie Gothic films have changed markedly in their tone, style, and structure since September 11, an evolution that expands the Gothic mode to include the mobility of the narratives protagonists, a popularisation of the movies, and an increased engagement with a multi-ethnic international community. To remain timely, relevant, and commercially viable, such alterations must occur, and these shifts in particular can best be explained by the changing cinematic marketplace, the influence of videogames, and the policies and anxieties resulting from the (inter)national trauma of 9/11 and the War on Terror. This essay examines the film version of World War Z as a key text for exploring the current transition from a localised siege narrative to an international kind of road trip movie, a shift largely tied to the popularity of zombie-themed videogames.

Gothic Studies
An Introduction
Jerrold Hogle and Andrew Smith

This tenth anniversary issue of Gothic Studies reconsiders how the study of the Gothic mode in many venues (from fiction and drama to cinema and video) has been deeply affected by a wide range of psychoanalytical, historicist, cultural, and literary theories that have been, and can still be, employed to interpret and explain the Gothic phenomenon. This collection builds on the most fruitful of existing theoretical perspectives on the Gothic, sometimes to transform them, or by suggesting new alliances between theory and the study of Gothic that will enrich both domains and advance the mission of Gothic Studies, as well as Gothic scholarship in general, to provide the best arena for understanding the Gothic in all its forms.

Gothic Studies
The Gothic in Shelley‘s ‘The Triumph of Life’
John Whatley

The criticism of Shelley‘s ‘The Triumph of Life’ now makes up a small library of its own, though the status of the poem as a fragment yet precludes any final closure of commentary. The article proposes that criticism of the ‘Triumph’ falls between two poles. One view, of which Paul De Man is representative, sees the Shelley of his final poem as mature, becoming skeptical of romantic uses of the language of the uncanny. The other, of which Ross Woodman is representative, sees him finally as a fascinated believer in the supernatural and transcendent. This paper argues that the poem might be better seen as a complex and subtle mixing of these two frames, a skeptical fascination that relies on Shelley‘s refined use of the Gothic mode in the poem. This unstable frame results in an evaluation of Rousseau‘s philosophy as a form of truth flawed by desire, and a counterfeit ghost of the originating ideas when it reaches the public sphere. Seen this way, Shelley places Rousseau‘s ‘shape all light’ within a pantheon of other great figures of world history as an idealist who was made into a gothic cult by those in power.

Gothic Studies
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Room for more: the future for Maturin research
Christina Morin

Illusions perdues (1837), which includes several references to Maturin’s Bertram . 17 Melmoth , in particular, was an evident source of both ‘fear and fascination’ for Balzac as he attempted to distance himself from literary romanticism and instead establish himself as a realist writer. As Lanone argues, this effort relied on the abjection of the Gothic mode, and, as a corollary, Balzac necessarily sought ‘to exorcise the

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

The Gothic mode Despite the fact of its being a handy literary catchphrase, the ‘Gothic’ and the ensuing literary trend, if we want to call it thus, did not emerge as a more or less ready-made genre in the fantasy of Horace Walpole after he supposedly dreamt of a castle, which he realized in Strawberry Hill in

in Gothic Renaissance
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The Museum of dust
Rebecca Munford

, the alluring literariness of Carter’s writing is most often at work as part of a feminist analysis of the ‘social fictions’ which shape identity and experience. As she argues in ‘Notes on the Gothic Mode’, the Gothic is primarily an analytic method. Concerned with dismantling its illusory structures, Carter’s textual practice does not just vampirically feed off this European Gothic bloodline. Rather

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Isabella van Elferen

Globalisation has given rise to two new gothic modes. Globalised gothic, on the one hand, can be defined as the circulation of gothic themes and styles in worldwide locations, through a range of media, and embedded in the capitalist structures of market and consumption. Globalgothic, on the other hand, offers a gothic critique of globalisation, exposing the anxieties and excesses that sift

in Globalgothic